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Thread: Project for the un-initiated novice and son...??

  1. #31
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    24

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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    No problem if you've got 'cubic money', Willliam!

    Otherwise,.. .. ..

    (I dug up one of my '37 OHVs.
    Literally.)

    ...Cotten
    PS: My daughter was with me, and about Will's age at the time.
    Holy cow. Haha. .
    That's awesome.

  2. #32
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
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    24

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    Quote Originally Posted by Skirted View Post
    Can't emphasize enough the value of attending a national swap meet to look around and talk to people. The season is winding down now but check the AMCA website for schedules and a Chapter near you. Contact the Chapter and make connections locally if at all possible.
    Like you I came here in my antique bike infancy and folks told me to attend a swap meet and join a chapter. I had done homework online on my own but actually meeting and talking to people with experience was a significant important step in making sure I bought the right bike. Since then I have seen others buy the wrong bike because they didn't get educated and it ends up being a bad experience for them.
    Don't buy a basket case starting out. Those are for guys with a garage full of parts (or a friend with a garage full of parts) and years of knowledge in the hobby. Buy the best running bike you can afford and trust me, there will still be plenty of projects for you and your son to work on. Good for you wanting to get your son interested in the hobby.
    Thank you Jason,
    Great advice!

    Wm. Covington
    Member 35521

  3. #33

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    Hello William,
    Been following this thread and there's a lot of good advice from experienced people, especially finding a running and fairly complete but not correct bike. Also getting all the literature you can pertaining to the bike you choose; shop manuals, rider's handbook, parts books. You might want to get a copy of Bruce Palmer's book, How To Restore Your HarleyDavidson, He is out of them but you might find a copy on line. It covers 1937 to 1964. He is working on a new edition now that will cover more models.
    By all means try to get to some meets. I realize being a farmer is a full time job but try to find the time. Now for my suggestion on a bike: Harley big twin, 1937 to 1948 74 or 80 Flathead or 1948 t0 1964 Panhead. In 1936 Harley made some good improvements: recirculating oil system, improved clutch and transmission, better wheel hubs, welded gas tanks, and built in speedometer..
    A couple if issues to think about and I am not trying to discourage you in any way. Is Will on the same page of enthusiasm as you about the project? At some point the project may get held up for one reason or another. Will he lose interest and back off? Just a thought. Also do you have a space dedicated to the project where you can organize it to store and work on the bike? Don't forget a sidecar takes up a lot of space.
    Anyway, hope to see you and Will at a meet digging for parts.
    Dave

  4. #34
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,177

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    Ammorest always gives good advice, and someone I always pay attention to. I don't know if this has been mentioned, but what about early to late '80s Evolution Big Twins? They are reasonably priced, many of them are still un-molested, they're all over the place, and sidecar ready. Early bikes are fantastic, but expensive, and super desirable so you will have a lot of competition for any bike, and needed parts. As Dave mentioned, any Harley from Shovelheads back are sought after and any Panhead and back is going to be a high dollar, total commitment project. I wouldn't try to talk you out of any bike you really want because once you have the passion to see a project through, you'll discover a whole new world of learning new skills, and milestone accomplishments. When people tell you it can't be done, it just makes you want to try harder
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  5. #35
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,341

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    PS: William and Will!

    You probably won't find your motorcycle.

    It will most likely find you.

    Please put the word out locally first...

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  6. #36
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    161

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    The BMWs from the 50s - 60s are already set up to attach a sidecar. They are reliable and can be found in good original condition and there is a good source of replacement parts for them. Look for models with the Earles Fork. The prices aren't too high compared to some brands.
    Jim D

  7. #37
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Location
    1 mile east of the Rocky Mountains.
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    873

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    fwiw, posted in my thread "J's out the gazoo"

    "Eric and Steve, if you know anyone looking for builders I have a '20 (loop frame), '25 JD, '27 JD, '28 JDH, and '29 JDH. Some assembly required, batteries not included. Also a spare frame or two, same with forks, a complete motor or two, same with transmissions, and lots of extra parts. Assembling baskets now for spring or summer. FYI. Rich P.S. Baskets will have all major parts and some gingerbread. Not to high, not to low price wise."

  8. #38
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
    Posts
    1,291

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    Quote Originally Posted by jim d View Post
    The BMWs from the 50s - 60s are already set up to attach a sidecar. They are reliable and can be found in good original condition and there is a good source of replacement parts for them. Look for models with the Earles Fork. The prices aren't too high compared to some brands.
    How many years have you been collecting these?

  9. #39
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    2,794

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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Swan View Post
    fwiw, posted in my thread "J's out the gazoo"

    "Eric and Steve, if you know anyone looking for builders I have a '20 (loop frame), '25 JD, '27 JD, '28 JDH, and '29 JDH. Some assembly required, batteries not included. Also a spare frame or two, same with forks, a complete motor or two, same with transmissions, and lots of extra parts. Assembling baskets now for spring or summer. FYI. Rich P.S. Baskets will have all major parts and some gingerbread. Not to high, not to low price wise."
    My '55 R69,
    Found in a horse trailer a few years back.....for $250.00 in original but rough shape.



    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  10. #40
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    490

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    William as for source material it depends on what brand you end up with. I really only know anything about HD and some about Indian as that is what interests me. For HD Palmers books are a must if you are looking at 36-64. There is also an Indian restoration guide but it is not as comprehensive as the Palmer guide is for HD. There are numerous books out there and some are good and some not so much. This and the CAI web site also has a ton of useful info and also what books are out there. I have selves full of books and find you never have enough as new information comes up all the time. Steve Slocomb has done good work on the VL series and Johnny Sells on the JD among others. As others have said going to swap meets and shows and looking and talking to folks help too. I know with the type of business you and the family are in time is and issue but also remember a lot of bikes were owned by farmers and some are still being found on those farms so you may be a lot closer to a real gem that you think. Talk to you neighbors and AMCA members who are in farm country and leads may pop up. Good Luck!

    Tom (Rollo) Hardy
    AMCA #12766

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