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Thread: Clutch adjustment question

  1. #31
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    Quote Originally Posted by ChiefTwoKicks View Post
    There must be a reason for the rear, spring-action tab on the clutch pedal. My guess is, that the action is more suited as you put your heel down firmly as the clutch FULLY engages.
    C2K, that makes sense, but I was of the impression that the heel of the clutch is hinged so that when you take an aggressive lean angle in a LH turn that both the footboard and the clutch heel will flex up to keep you from augering in if you lean too far ;-)
    Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

  2. #32
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    And Folks wonder why launches are jerky.

    Even my wife thought a stiff footclutch was "stupid",
    (when I thought she needed a "training clutch".)

    She's always right.

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  3. #33
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    I put all of my vehicles in neutral at stop lights because I think it is safer, and easier on the clutch. Modern Kevlar clutches really minimized gear grinding on my Chief, but long term familiarity with a bike's mechanical personality also helps with 1st gear take-offs, and modern age stop and go. Just my opinion, but I like a clutch that has 'feel', and is easier to slip.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  4. #34
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    Compelled to ride a wide variety of footclutches, Folks,..

    The very first rule, as instructed, was never, ever trust the pedal at a stop.

    That crutch is the original "suicide" clutch.

    You learn your very first ride to get in neutral BEFORE you come to a stop.
    Or slap it out of gear in a panic.

    ....Cotten
    PS: I have some King Clutches and spring sets that need a home...
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  5. #35
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    Apr 2008
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    Oak View, CA.
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    to Pisten-Bully... I've never been able to lean my skirted Chief ('47) over to the left (or right) to even scrape the footboards. On my Rigid frame bikes, its an everyday piece of cake !! I had never imagined that might be the reason for the spring-hinged pedal... but, it does make alot of sense.

    My rigid frame bikes are obviously lower to the ground and so much more nimble and easy to throw around. Thats one reason they are such a joy to ride. On the other hand, the much heavier and almost top heavy (compared to the rigid frames) late models seem a bit less spirited when it comes to handling. I think most would agree if having experience on both. The seating position on the later frames is somewhat more upright, and your feet sit flatter on the boards. Two very different styles of riding. Might be a reason the rigid frame are more sought after, besides just being pre-war. The difference is striking. I ride all my bikes regularly, and when I switch, I really have to watch myself when its plunger to rigid. Not so much, when its the other way around. Many ask which I prefer. I always answer... which ever one I can get started first.
    As to Cotton's comment about getting into neutral before coming to a stop. I don't do that either. Because, when its time to go forward, my foot is nearly always on the clutch. If I took it out of gear and then reset to begin my travels, it might possibly grind into gear or I might stall the bike. The only time I take my foot off the pedal is at an extended stoplight, when I might be waiting almost a minute at a busy intersection. Again, risk of a stall. And yes, it still happens once in a while. For the most part, my left foot stays on the footboard, I rarely put it on the pavement.
    Maybe its a balance thing. But I'd have to shift my weight and lift my leg and all that, to reset my forward momentum. For me, thats awkward. I have enough to do, just shifting and throttling with my upper body, etc., and its too much moving around in the saddle. I have to think too much, I've got an artificial knee on my right leg. Maybe that has an impact in my movements or decision making. These days its almost an automatic reflex, but when I started riding, its alot to think about and work through.
    In traffic, I want to keep any extra activities to a minimum. Its not as safe out there as it once was. I live out here in Southern California, and it can get pretty hectic, what with all the idiots looking down at their damn iphones at the stoplight (or worse, a stop sign). Its bad enough it happens while the traffic is moving along at a faster pace than I like to ride....
    OK. end of rant for now !! sorry I got so far off track about the clutch topic. C2K

  6. #36
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    Jan 2008
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    Lipdog
    You should be able to tighten the castellated nut so much that you can not move the clutch pedal. Perhaps the small coil spring under it is not heavy enough or not long enough.
    Tom

  7. #37

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilcock View Post
    Lipdog
    You should be able to tighten the castellated nut so much that you can not move the clutch pedal. Perhaps the small coil spring under it is not heavy enough or not long enough.
    Tom
    I think this is the problem. I first took apart the pedal assembly and made sure there was no paint on any friction surface. Then I replaced the bare metal disk, friction plate, friction material, and spring (using the correct, higher tension one from Kiwi). I disconnected the clutch rod and tightened the nut pretty much all the way, and while it is smooth and there is friction, it's not that hard to rotate. I'm going to take it apart again and roughen the surfaces a bit so I can get more friction and control from tightening the nut.

    Now that I've taken a good look at the clutch and the measurements, friction material, and worm gear, I don't want to take it apart. I'm going to button up the primary cover with a new gasket from Kiwi that has a dry silicon bead on it. Question: do people install this gasket dry, or do you use something like RTV or Yamabond? Unless it's something like a valve cover gasket installed on a part I have to remove from time to time, I usually use Permatex gasket glue on one side and then black ultra RTV or one of the gray sealants like Yamabond on the other. I don't use TheRightStuff anymore - too hard to get off.

  8. #38
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    Quote Originally Posted by pisten-bully View Post
    C2K, that makes sense, but I was of the impression that the heel of the clutch is hinged so that when you take an aggressive lean angle in a LH turn that both the footboard and the clutch heel will flex up to keep you from augering in if you lean too far ;-)
    Harley-Davidson J series clutch pedals also have the hinge/spring feature. I can't imagine anyone leaning a J Harley far enough to benefit from that hinge feature, but I think their (H-D, and Indian) reasoning was in the event the bike was laid down on purpose. In the case of Indian, that was how you removed a wheel on skirted fender Chiefs.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  9. #39

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    Reviewing Chief Mikes "Clutch Replacement" Tech video: Dry I think. Applies Yamabond only for clutch release worm nut.

  10. #40
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    Jun 2007
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    Catonsville,Md.
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    If surfaces are good nothing is needed ,but if a little uneven a light coat of silicone sealant smear on back of gasket with fingers. Do not use Yamabond unless you have the Samoan tag team wrestlers to help it apart.

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