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Thread: Value of a 1937 Harley UL 80? Starting a business and need some capital...

  1. #11

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    I have 30 offers $18k to over $20k

    Here are updated pictures
    https://pixel8.smugmug.com/37-Harley-UL/n-N8tPhs/

  2. #12
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    Aug 2004
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    Quote Originally Posted by Beinggodisgreat View Post
    I have 30 offers $18k to over $20k

    Here are updated pictures
    https://pixel8.smugmug.com/37-Harley-UL/n-N8tPhs/
    You should jump on that. Every time I look at it I see more reasons not to like it. Just the upside down fender brace on the Servi-Car fender makes me cringe!
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    Central Florida
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    It IS a 1937, but none of that stuff displayed in front of it belongs to that bike, being ALL later stuff. The cheese graters, lights, fishtail muffler, even the saddlebags, which are post-war. The bike tells us that it led a tough life and was ridden hard and put away wet. Many times.
    Fenders and taillight and spotlight bar are all later, as is the "dogbone" handlebar, dashboard and the tanks, both gas (which are 1947 or 48)) and the flare-fitting oil tank... As parts for that bike, they're all basically swap meet inventory to trade for correct parts. At this point, just build what you have into a good-looking bike and don't address originality at all, and you could build a $20-30K bike out of it. But it's no where near that yet.
    It's worth basically the sum of the parts bolted to it when you get past the engine and frame; and maybe, the trans. It looks like someone may have kept a Thirty-seven running by slapping later parts on it when it needed refreshing, for several decades. The number you scraped the grease offa looks original, and unmolested. You can look with a flashlight into the crotch between the cylinders, under the carburetor and see numbers, the casting numbers for the cylinders, which happen in their case to also be the Harley part numbers, as Kitabel mentioned in shorthand: 120-37 on the bottom flange of the front cylinder, facing a 120-371 number on the rear cylinder flange. That was the first and only year Harley factory put 3 5/16"-bored 13-fin cylinders on their 74-inch bikes. Took um a while to realize that as a result, owners could rebuild those cylinders over-and-over alla way through o.s. 80 sizes without HAVING TO BUY NEW CYLINDERS FROM THE FACTORY!
    Couldn't have that! In 1938, new "120-38" and "120-381" thinner-walled 11-fin cylinders were made for 74s, and the dash-37 13-fin cylinders were reserved only to 80-inch UH and ULH models, through 1941. You have the right cylinders, but it would take removing the tanks again to remove the heads to see what o.s. they are. And you could check out the valves and lower end clearances while you're in there. Good luck!
    Last edited by Sargehere; 10-07-2019 at 10:31 PM.

  4. #14
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    Jul 2006
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    Central Florida
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    I think it may well be the original 1937 Frame, that was upgraded with the factory-recommended tab welded on the left rear axle hanger to keep the rear brake arm from falling out of its retaining slot, as shown in this pic. In 1938 that fix, "recall" was issued from Milwaukee, and many 37's got it.

  5. #15
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    Central Florida
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    THAT is a good, untouched late-1937 engine number.

  6. #16
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    Apr 2009
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    I am in central CT 06424 and will gladly come over and help you figure out exactly what you have and what it is worth.
    Then you can decide if it is worth selling as one lot or parting it out.
    As far as bringing the bike back to life in barn find condition and making it all 1937??
    Rebuild motor and trans $5 to 6K, sheet metal including correct tanks $4 to 5K, Dash and gauges $2-3K easy, footboards 3 to 5 hundred, cycleray a grand, 18 inch wheels all rebuilt with redone hubs and new roadworthy tires $2K, 9 bolt horn, oil tank, toolbox another 2-3K$ etc etc etc. So buy the bike at 25K$ and put another 20 to 25K+$ into it including parts, hardware and labor and what do you have and what is it worth at that point? PM me and send me your phone number if you want me to look at it. . 46EL
    Last edited by 46EL; 10-08-2019 at 06:42 AM.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2009
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    Quote Originally Posted by 1950Panhead View Post
    List on ebay, you will get the best offer, my guess is $13.5k in present state.

    If you have the original tanks, fenders, wheels, handlebars it would bring more.
    Just the motor and frame if it is in fact an original 37 frame are worth 15K$ all by themselves.
    Throw in the springer and if it is 37 now we are up to $20K. And from what I saw on ebay the trans if it also is 37 now we are up to what he has been offered for the whole package. The handlebar risers on the bike now are worth what the original 37 bars are worth if you had them. If the speedo works and hasn't been opened and the rear brake backing plate is 37 only add another 2-3K$. Clutch pedal original rear stand, original 3 rivet chainguard worth another couple of thousand??$$$. Saddlebags, spotlights, cheese graters etc$$$$ ..Tanks and rear fender $$$$$+++++ .....Sorry 1950Panhead" Do the math? Maybe double your estimate of 13.5$? Need I say more? 46EL
    Last edited by 46EL; 10-08-2019 at 08:16 AM.

  8. #18
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    Sep 2005
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    Sarasota, Florida
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    Looks like a later inline 'straight' fork and not the kicked forward rigid fork which would have been on a '37.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  9. #19

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    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    Looks like a later inline 'straight' fork and not the kicked forward rigid fork which would have been on a '37.
    No outside grease zerks for the spring rod bushings, no bosses for the grease zerks on the rockers and the position of the front brake cable clamp mounting screw are consistent with the '37 fork.

  10. #20
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    Sep 2005
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    You're right about those points, Kozy, and that would be right for an early fork, but they still look too straight. Maybe it got bumped.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

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