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Thread: 1947 Chief tracking issue

  1. #1

    Default 1947 Chief tracking issue

    Recently adjusted the chain on my Chief. During the test ride I noticed that the rear of the bike would slide off to the right in a left hand turn. Additionally, if the bike was on the crown of the road, the rear would want to drift off to the right. When I do the chain adjustment, I am careful to make the same adjustments on both sides. After various measurements and geometric calculations, I finally got the bike to track properly. Ran a strait edge along the wheels and everything looks good. Been riding 49 years and this has NEVER happened to me before. Anyone else ever run into this issue? Huge adrenaline rush when this first happened........

  2. #2

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    Chiefs will pogo on hard turns one way when out of alignment also. I use two old 8' fluorescent light tubes for straight edges on both sides of tires. The measured length of exposed adjuster bolts should be equal. Noticed one sided sprocket wear once and aligned rear wheel to track chain centered on sprocket (there is side to side clearance on chains) just for reference. In a perfect world motorcycles track straight without leaning when taking hands off handlebars on a flat level slab. I have bumped adjustment by seat of pants to achieve.
    Good luck

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    746

    Default

    All helpful Bubbalowe, thanks! I discovered a broken coil in my rear suspension last winter on one side when I tore down the rear suspension...replaced the spring and this season my Chief tracks so much better!
    Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,313

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Bubbalowe View Post
    ...I use two old 8' fluorescent light tubes for straight edges on both sides of tires...
    I found an easier way, Bubbalowe!

    Just one long piece of conduit, with two long pointers clamped to it, like a trammel.

    First I roll the bike far enough to make the front wheel track 'straight', and then set the pointers to the distance between axle centers on that side of the machine.
    Then when compared to the axle centers on the other side, any misalignment at the rear becomes measureable.

    ....Cotten
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    Last edited by T. Cotten; 09-28-2019 at 11:56 AM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  5. #5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    I found an easier way, Bubbalowe!

    Just one long piece of conduit, with two long pointers clamped to it, like a trammel.

    First I roll the bike far enough to make the front wheel track 'straight', and then set the pointers to the distance between axle centers on that side of the machine.
    Then when compared to the axle centers on the other side, any misalignment at the rear becomes measureable.

    ....Cotten
    Thanks for the tip Cotten. I'll be using that one.
    Nothing left to do but smile, smile, smile....
    -good ol GD

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Reno NV
    Posts
    201

    Default

    Last time I did this was with a laser I had. It was attached to a cheap spirit level someone gave me.

    Set it up a few inches above the floor with the laser touching the rear tire at the two widest places. Easily seen with the naked eye.
    use a tape measure to set the front tire parallel to the laser.

    Transfer the laser to the other side of the rear tire and repeat the measurement, without moving the front wheel.
    Repeat as necessary until the front tire is parallel to the rear tire and has the same center line.

    Just another option in the tool box, and the level is useful occasionally.

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