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Thread: Another unknown Wisconsin Motorcycle?

  1. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Rubone View Post
    This is fact. Nearly all heavy industry at that time was in the north, with Southern Wisconsin, Northern Illinois, South Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, PA, all in the middle of it. The Firearms industry was mostly in New England and NY and they were a hot spot for engineers, machinists, etc. Industrial innovation always happened near the source of like minded thought, skilled labor, and access to resources.
    Some very good points guys thanx...Brett

  2. #12
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    Your welcome. I just got home. Don't forget about Chicago either. There were motorcycles made there very early too. Can't think of them just now. My remembry isn'y what it used to be.

    Here we go.

  3. #13
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    Quote Originally Posted by duffeycycles View Post
    Minnesta also had some early bike builders...seems crazy but true.PEM,I really enjoy your posts & the hospital volunteer !!!
    What were (are) the requirements then for headlights back lights back then as compared to now, If i had say a 1916 harley now ,what is it required to have to be road legal?? Headlight , rear tail lights , just curious???

  4. #14
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    The motorcycles in those photos above was an Advance. The original photo below is the first I have ever seen that was really detailed and just might be the only one in existence of an Advance motorcycle. When the old guy showed it to me I couldn't believe it. I had read about it in my research for years but nobody knew what it looked like or who built it and how many. We do now.
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  5. #15
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    Quote Originally Posted by pem View Post
    The motorcycles in those photos above was an Advance. The original photo below is the first I have ever seen that was really detailed and just might be the only one in existence of an Advance motorcycle. When the old guy showed it to me I couldn't believe it. I had read about it in my research for years but nobody knew what it looked like or who built it and how many. We do now.
    Seems it was like the snowmobile craze in the late 60s to mid 70s...

  6. #16
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    The rider is Oscar Graf from Milwaukee. He was a member of the Comet motorcycle Club and that is where the first two photos came from in a 1910 Wisconsin Motorist. So now we have 3 photos of an Advance motorcycle. They were built in Milwaukee starting in 1908 I believe. We know this from a Nov. 1908 Motorcycle Illustrated magazine article where they say "Although the Merkel plant has been consolidated with that of the Light , Milwaukee is still the home of four motorcycles. These are the Harley-Davidson, the Feilback, the Comet and the Advance".

    It was built by E.h. Leet & J.E. Stoll who actually took out a patent on the Advance frame. Patent #944,795, application date Aug. 21, 1908, patent date Dec. 28, 1909. I showed Herb a copy of the photo and Herb being Herb he found this patent.

    Leet was the mechanical man I think and Stoll was the money man. Leet was listed in the Machinist Monthly Journal, vol. 22. He lived at 695 37th St. just a few blocks from Harley-Davidson. Stoll I found in Viroqua, Wi. near the Mississippi River not far from where I lived in Sabin, Wi. He was a stock holder in Nov. 1909 at the State Bank of Viola not far from Viroqua or Sabin. What he was doing 175 miles from Milwaukee I just don't know.
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  7. #17
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    Don't know if they had a small shop or if they built it behind Leet's house in his garage. Don't know which foundries they used or machine shops.

    There were 5 Advance motorcycles in the Wi. registrations from 1909 to 1912. So it was a production motorcycle. Oscar Graf's Advance wasn't in the registrations but I don't have a complete list. Plus a lot of guys didn't register their motorcycles.

    Here's what we know.

    Advance Motorcycle Owners;

    Reg. #158, 8-1909, Wiliam Jerrang, 888 6th St., Milw.

    Reg. #312, 9-1909, Walter Stuiple, 719 34th St., Milw. Ser #7, 3hp(just blocks from HD and Comet)

    Reg. 883, 5-1910, Edward H. Leet, 695 37th St., Milw. Ser # 1007, Maker-Leet & Stoll, 3 1/2hp.

    Reg. #896, 6-1910, Wm. Schultz, 855 33rd St., Milw. Maker-J. E. Stoll, 3 1/2hp.

    Reg. #1797, -1911, J. Martin, 558 10th ave., Milw. Ser. #1007, 3 1/2hp.

    I see Ser. #1007 is registered twice under different names. I didn't notice that before.

    So how many were built? My guess is less than a dozen but there is really no way to know for now. It looked well sorted out and up to date. Quite nicely finished. Was it painted white?

    Sadly, this is all I know about the Advance Motorcycle. Maybe somebody will see this and have more information.
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  8. #18
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    Hey Chris, while your here I have a question. Last night a old high school buddy stopped and we went through his old photos he brought along. We found a photo of my 1955 Ford lime green panel truck. Until last night I never had a photo of it. Anyway, it was brought back to Wisconsin from California in 1972 or 1973 by Pat Hart after he got out of the service. I bought it from Pat and he said it was painted by Steve McQueen. That's all I know. He didn't say he had owned it just painted it.

    It had farm implement tires. Big fat round things with just groves running around the tires. No cross groves at all. We drove up to Elkhart Lake for the June Sprints to camp at Plymouth Rock camp ground. On the way it started raining and going up a steep road the rear tires just broke loose and spun. Not good. We got to Plymouth Rock campground and parked on the side of a hill horizontal with the hill. I turned off the ignition, and sat for about 5-10 seconds and the truck started sliding down this big hill sideways all the way to the bottom. Why we didn't roll I'll never know. Soon after I bought different tires.

    My question is did you ever see this truck back in the day? Not sure what city it was painted in.
    And how do you get the photos to show up full size and not thumbnails?

    Thanks
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  9. #19
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    Quote Originally Posted by brettxlch View Post
    What were (are) the requirements then for headlights back lights back then as compared to now, If i had say a 1916 harley now ,what is it required to have to be road legal?? Headlight , rear tail lights , just curious???
    Iím guessing there were few, if any, requirements for lighting (we do see old photos of bikes without any lights)...at least legally required lights anyway. FMVSS (Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards) originated in the 1960ís, so if there were legal requirements they would have been from local or state regulations.

    Customer demand for lights must have been the driving (err...riding) force behind lighted motorcycles?
    Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

  10. #20
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    Quote Originally Posted by brettxlch View Post
    My question is why Wisconsin, I know indian is in mass, but i wonder if word of mouth , rich folk around in that part of the country. One would think down south ware you could ride all or most of the year...
    Milwaukee was full of foundries and machine shops and all kinds of factories making everything from bicycles to boat motors. Pre 1910 was a boom time for new ideas. Airplanes, boats, trains, autos, motorcycles, etc., etc., etc. It had all the breweries which had to be outfitted with equipment. They were huge. Plus rail yards and slaughter houses, tanneries and everything else you can think of. Just like now back yard mechanics were building autos, motorcycles, you name it.
    Look at all the home built airplanes you see today at Oshkosh. Amazing!

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