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Thread: My 101 Scout Cannonball Build

  1. #21

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    >> 68% is the first time I ever heard a factor for 101s, just like most other machines.
    >> Sounds good to me because just about anything works (as long everything else is in order).

    It’s the only number I was able to find. I found it on another board, about ten years old. He responded later and said the bike ran great. The other reason I thought I’d use 68 is if I don’t like it. I can take the motor apart and drill more holes to lower it. If I start to small I’d have to add weight back in.

    >> So I suggest estimating what it came with if you can, and determining what you've got as is, before eating metal.
    I’m on the road right now, when I get back I will. I’m not sure what that’s going to tell me. The pistons I pulled out were aluminum and the rods looked original. And unfortunately the bike was a basket case when I got it and the owner sadly was long gone. So I don’t know how it was used or how it ran. I’ll look harder when I get home.

    >>
    Can you weigh your rod tops?

    I cheated, the rods came with a spec sheet, weights, lengths, bores. I have the weights but they’re at home.

    >> Kitabel..
    I’ll take my time a do everything you suggested. I can use the depth gauge to verify the depth of the drills. And an angle wheel to put the holes in the same spot on both wheels. And as always, measure, measure, and measure some more.

    Cotten, I agree there’s no way I’m taking metal off of the connecting rods.

    At the end of the day, even though it’s just a number I’d like to at least try for better then just throw it all together and hope for the best.

    Thanks,
    Dana

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
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    If you trust the spec sheet, Dana,

    Then you can determine the resulting factor of your new assembly by hanging the wheels and bare rods upon your beams, and adding weights to the rod tops until it achieves balance.

    The added weight plus the rod tops then divided by the actual reciprocating weight gives you the existing factor.

    Then decide if you want to change it; Please remember that the noble grace of a single-throw V twin is that it will run quite smooth over a wide range of factors. Motor balancing is for the motor's benefit, not the rider.

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  3. #23

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    On the never ending hunt for parts, I got to hit up the Dixon swap meet yesterday on my way home. A few posts ago I mentioned my magneto was missing a few critical pieces, like the magnet and coil. I was able to score not one, but two splitdorf ns2’s! They both look to be in good restorable shape.

    85589C68-4D6A-428D-AD28-A73833A7A971.jpg

    I’m hoping I can make two good running magnetos and use one as a spare for the cannonball.

  4. #24

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    It’s been awhile but I’m back to the flywheels. This may be a stupid question but what keeps the flywheel crankshaft thrust washers on? I’ve staked them to the flywheel and the pins keep the thrust washers from spinning, but how do they stay flat against the flywheel? Mine are so lose they just fall off if I hold the flywheel down.

    B2DDE06F-DEF9-48EE-A6AE-021D6E7E22BA.jpg

    Thanks for any help

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    Central Illinois, USA
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    Vaseline, Dana!

    ....Cotten
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    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  6. #26

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    That made me laugh, my dad’s answer to everything was ‘Vaseline’.

    Thanks for bringing back the memories.

  7. #27

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    It's always something. I trued the wheel assembly up in my lathe. It went easier then I thought it would. Using the press to push down on both wheels at once to square the two wheels up. My first measurements were in the 3 thousands mark. A lot of banging and squeezing later and I'm down to less then 0.001 run out on both the pinion and drive shafts! The whole process took about two hours. The first time!

    After I was all done and just about to 'Bag and Tag' them I thought I should test the oil feed passages. I was pretty careful about lining up the crankshaft to match but better safe then sorry. Sure enough the passage was blocked somewhere. I couldn't blow through the oil feed hole.

    A little bit of searching found the problem. Both my new crankshaft, old crankshaft and the old flywheel had the oil feed hole drilled 3/8" from the inside face of the flywheel. But my new flywheels had the oil feed hole drilled 3/8" from the outside face. It was off by about 1/4".
    IMG_1314.jpg

    Other then returning the flywheel that I had already balanced and lapped true the only fix I could see was to move one the holes. The crankshaft is hardened steel and I really didn't think drilling into that was an option. So I put the flywheel on the mill and made a small 1/4" slot to connect the two holes. I was concerned modifying the taper was going to screw up the truing process but it all seemed to work out.

    Truing was easier the second time, almost like they knew where to be. Or, I knew how hard to hit them to get them to move.

    Moral of the story, trust no one and always check parts as they arrive to make sure they fit and are correct. I could have easily returned the flywheels before I modified them.

    WTR : 62

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    482

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    If you have good Indian wheels that are not worn you dont need anything.The washer should fit tight almost snapping into the recess.
    If you washers fall out of the recess with new wheels the recess is to big.If they still fall out after staking you need bigger thrust washers or new wheels.
    The usual fix is carefull shrinkage of the recess with a dull center punch,and I usually add a smear of red loctite to the back side of the washer.
    BTW I thought I remember Tom Cotten mentioning a method of fitting harley washers to Indian wheels with bubuggered pins and recesses but forget the details.
    Tom

  9. #29
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
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    [QUOTE=d_lasher;181945...Truing was easier the second time, almost like they knew where to be. Or, I knew how hard to hit them to get them to move.....[/QUOTE] That's called "memory", Dana!

    Works for chassis frames, too, except for the hitting part.

    Using my babbit hammer on flywheels was always ONLY out of frustration.
    Then I learned to lap tapers first: http://virtualindian.org/10techfly.htm

    Your results may vary...

    ....Cotten
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 07-02-2019 at 02:17 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  10. #30

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    I never really felt great about the thrust washers in the flywheels and I saw Tom's answer above after I had already torqued and locked them. It always seems it take me three times to get something right. So I decided to redo the flywheels for a the third time. I used a center punch to make four small indents around the thrust washer. It's tighter now and they don't fall out if I hold them upside down and shake. Let's hope three times the charm.

    The next job is grinding and lapping the valves and seats. Does anyone have an opinion on grinding the seats? Should I go for a three angle seat and have a narrower valve seat, or go for straight 35 degree angle and use the full seat?

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