Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 13

Thread: Data base using engine #

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2019
    Posts
    1

    Default Data base using engine #

    New AMCA member from southern Wisconsin with 1941 UL. Is there a web site I can access using engine #? Id like to know if this was originally built as a solo or as a side car bike. An earlier owner claims this was always a side car bike but I want to verify, thanks. Mike

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    813

    Default

    There is no way to find this info. If the bike has a 3 speed and reverse trans, that might indicate a side car bike, but the trans could have changed any time after the bike left the factory.
    VPH-D

  3. #3

    Default

    i agree,if it was a sidehack bike should see where mounts were on.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,266

    Default

    The Harley book 'The Legend Begins' gives production numbers by year, with some double counting of military bikes. For 1941 it shows 884 U models, 1888 US models and 715 UL models. The US models may be the military sidecar bikes going to South Africa, with more in 1942. The S in the engine number, presumably for sidecar, was very rarely stamped, but these bikes would have had low compression heads and small drive sprockets. Exports to other countries, surely not many, would tend to be U models because of poorer quality gas. For the US market some solo riders, and Police, liked the U bikes as solos, while some sidecar riders would take the UL with a tad more power. So we don't really know, and the factory records were supposedly dumped in the AMF years. Maybe Bruce Palmer's 'How to Restore Your Military Harley-Davidson' would give you the South African engine number range. Check if your bike is a U or a UL, count the teeth on the drive sprocket, and shine a torch under the cylinder heads to see if you have two cast bars (high compression), one for medium, or none for low compression heads.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by VPH-D View Post
    There is no way to find this info. If the bike has a 3 speed and reverse trans, that might indicate a side car bike, but the trans could have changed any time after the bike left the factory.
    VPH-D
    I'd tend to agree with assessment -- but thankfully there were enough minor changes to help you narrow down what you have or do not have. These are well outlined in Palmers How to Restore your 1936-64 HD.

    An inaccurate, though indicative, way to figure out if your trans is original to the bike or at least close to it is to examine the foundry marks. In theory, the original transmission would carry a 1940 or 41 date stamp -- but nothing later. If it were say a '46 transmission -- that would tell you it's been replaced at some point in time.

    I got super lucky with my '46 pieces parts bike. I bought a transmission off a buddy that I knew to be pre-1950(ish). Once I cleaned up the bottom I found an H-46 date code (August 1946). Go figure.

    There was a bit more to the UL/ULH than just higher compression . . .not much, but a bit.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    2,596

    Default

    August '46 is a '47 model year gearbox....
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2018
    Location
    Chicago
    Posts
    29

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Rubone View Post
    August '46 is a '47 model year gearbox....
    Shhh, don't tell anyone :-)

    Seriously, thanks for making sure this was accurate.

    And to be clear; the stamp is H-6; not H-46; I'm typing too much "junk" today. I was just happy to have date stamps near one another (motor is F6) as there is no intention of passing this machine off as "restored" and certainly no intention to ever represent it as "correct."

    I'll go back to my corner now.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    2,596

    Default

    No worries, my 46UL is a mixed bag as well. I'm not even trying to get close with it. Doing it a a race bike hauler like a dealer may have built out of the junk in his back lot..
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  9. #9

    Default

    There was a bit more to the UL/ULH than just higher compression . . .not much, but a bit.
    Specifically?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Charles Town, West Virginia
    Posts
    33

    Default

    Welcome to the AMCA. I have a '41 UL too. Believe or not it's my dream bike.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •