Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 26

Thread: Hard shifting into 3rd gear

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,129

    Default Hard shifting into 3rd gear

    I have a 1948FL with a 4 speed transmission and a jockey top with the selector arm pointing down. I don't care about codes so I don't know if it's a numbers correct year trans. My problem has been hard shifting into 3rd. All other gears are easy, and down shifting from high is also no problem. Obviously, I'll have to take the transmission out at some point. Any ideas on what might be going on in that hellish gear chamber of horrors
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    ...Any ideas on what might be going on in that hellish gear chamber of horrors
    Simple Eric!

    Start by accepting that it is probably the most reliable and service-friendly component of the whole motorcycle.

    ....Cotten
    PS: ""jockey""?
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 12-29-2018 at 04:41 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,129

    Default

    Useless information; as usual.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,146

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    Useless information; as usual.
    Useless to the useless.

    The HD four speed transmission design famously outlasted their assigned motors in service, and outlasted upgraded motor designs over the decades of the Golden Age of American motorcycles, even into the tragic Shovel era.

    Deny that?

    ....Cotten
    PS: Indian might have survived with a decent gearbox.
    But even HD's attempt to improve the Indian design for Ks and Sports proved inferior.
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 12-29-2018 at 05:18 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,129

    Default

    I deleted my post because it was improper. I started this thread to get a few insights from fellow AMCA members who offer real knowledge, and not hollow pontification. If you know something that may help me, please respond; if not, keep it to yourself.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    2,725

    Default

    Eric, some of the earlier boxes tended to be a bit more difficult to shift into third, a combination of no back cut on the 3rd-high shift clutch, worn 3rd gear bushing, and shaft speeds. The later "improved " shifter clutch is relieved both sides, not just the high side. The '59 and later 3rd gear is also an improvement as it remains square to the shaft instead of tilting slightly due to the narrow bushing. The shifter fork tends to wear more on that side as well with the early clutch as it has to push harder for longer to get engagement. A gearbox inspection is likely in order. And BT gearboxes are some of the most simple components on an H-D, no fear!!
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,129

    Default

    Thank you, Robbie. That is the kind of information I was looking for. First class, as always Robbie.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    150

    Default

    Eric; Robbie is correct on all points. One problem that I have seen is the use of replacement shift forks. Most Harley people like to use USA parts. If your shift fork is bent, beware of Andrews shift forks. They were made of hard steel that would tend to break instead of bend. These caused major transmission problems, including broken cases. A bent fork will cause grinding and hard shifting verses a transmission lock up. For this reason I use OEM or Taiwan forks. They are NOT as hard. Maybe Andrews has changed the process for making forks ? I don't know. I'm sure that you won't be race track shifting your '48, which likely caused the broken shift forks in the first place. But just a heads up.
    Craig

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,129

    Default

    Thanks for that, Craig. A friend of mine mentioned shift forks as well. I thought I did a good exam of the parts when I put that transmission together but something is not happy in there. I took a long ride today, and was able to keep it in high gear most of the time, but 3rd is just too aggravating to live with.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Ohio
    Posts
    657

    Default

    My brother had the same issue years ago and he forgot to install one of the shifting fork rollers, 34168-39. Maybe one of yours has an issue, when you pull the lid, I would make sure both are there. And look at the cam to make sure all is good on the roller tracks and overall end play of the cam. Might save you the trouble of digging deeper. Bob
    Bob Rice #6738

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •