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Thread: Ted's Straightleg Frames

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    642

    Default Ted's Straightleg Frames

    Has anyone had any experience with Ted's '54-'57 Straight Leg Frame? I wondered how it was for form, fit, function?

    http://www.vtwinmfg.com/webapp/wcs/s...102_3359652_-1

    Thanks,
    William
    William Edwards, AMCA #10035

    Attend the 2019 Southern National Meet at Denton Farmpark, NC, 17-18 May 2019
    http://www.amcasouthernnationalmeet.com/

  2. #2

    Default

    Not a direct reply to your question, but...
    Ted has somewhat of a reputation for rude conversation, late delivery, bad service, and bad products. Is this frame a problem? I don't know - but I wouldn't buy one, even if I saw it in person.

  3. #3

    Default

    I can only speak of one I got my hands on about 12 years ago.
    The engine mounts were so far off that when any of my Pan or shovel cases or my dedicated fixture was placed into the frame with the two rear 3/8 bolts in place, only bolts would pass through the front holes.
    I could go on and on about how virtually no dimensions were correct, welds were ran circumferentially when the application called for longitudinal , no lower seat post bushing provision etc. etc. but the bottom line is, even if this frame had been functional, there are still a lot of differences between repop and the real thing that become apparent when you set them side by side.
    If you buy one, mock up your bike immediately so you can send it back if need be.
    After disclosing the shortcomings of the frame I had, I ended up selling it at a swap meet for a loss and repaired the original.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    May 2009
    Posts
    138

    Default

    I purchased a V-Twin straightleg frame about 20 years ago when they were made in Connecticut. It required some work to make it usable, but I've been riding it ever since with no issues. I have seen frames from that era that were simply not worth repairing. The frames are now made in Asia, and I can't speak of them. Mr. Kitabel's comments are worth consideration.

  5. #5

    Default

    "Asia" per se is certainly not a problem.
    However, the manufacturer knows that the customers are 10,000 miles away, and they will not have to make any refunds.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2005
    Location
    Northern Colorado
    Posts
    833

    Default

    I used one about 8 years ago, there were some minor problems, but the bike is still on the road.
    VPH-D

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2008
    Location
    North Carolina
    Posts
    642

    Default

    Thanks to all for your comments. I had heard of these issues on older manufactured frames and wondered if Ted had stepped up in quality for later production frames. My inclination is to continue hunting for an original frame - even if repairs are needed.
    William Edwards, AMCA #10035

    Attend the 2019 Southern National Meet at Denton Farmpark, NC, 17-18 May 2019
    http://www.amcasouthernnationalmeet.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Posts
    1,112

    Default

    In the end your bike will be worth much more with an original frame.I have built a knuck from an earlier Tedds frame with little frame issues...the bike sold for 10 grand less than it would have with original frame !!!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Jersey City
    Posts
    2,075

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by wideglide38 View Post
    Thanks to all for your comments. I had heard of these issues on older manufactured frames and wondered if Ted had stepped up in quality for later production frames. My inclination is to continue hunting for an original frame - even if repairs are needed.
    You got a better chance of seeing Jesus Christ

  10. #10

    Default

    Couple years ago a friend asked me to build him a bobber.He had a 62 pan bottom end with a shovel top end in a custom rigid frame with a long glide fork. We got a V-Twin wishbone frame, offset springer fork, bobbed fenders, shorty mufflers, and other assorted parts. Here are some of the issues: Frame: 1. tank mount holes way off. Had a pair of NOS 78 FX tanks that fit an original frame perfectly. Had to elongate the upper holes in the tanks and add metal to the lower frame mount. 2. Rear rocker box hit the frame top motor mount Had to grind frame for clearance. 3. Had to grind frame at front transmission mount for left brake crossover lever. 4. Had to grind out clearance for front lower kickstand bolt nut. 5. Speedometer cable hole too small. Had to grind out bigger. 6. Oil tank mount holes drilled and tapped crooked.
    Fork: Rear legs not aligned, axle would not go through rockers. Slipped a pipe over the leg and gave it a jerk. Lined it up. (good metal, huh?) Fenders: Front fender holes for fork tabs so far off I had to remake them. Front of front fender way off to one side. Rear fender: chainguard bracket slot would not let chainguard line up with primary/oil tank holes . Mufflers: Shorty mufflers were sloppy on the exhaust pipes. Made sleeves to take up the space. These were all Taiwan parts.
    But their USA made rear chainguard was perfect. These are the defects I can remember. I'm sure there were more.
    Saw Ted at Oley. Told him about all the problems and he acted surprised. Of course no offer of any compensation. I probably have at least 20 hours making this stuff usable. You have been warned.
    Dave

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