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Thread: 35 year rule has this finally reached a limit of what is an antique? 1985 is it?

  1. #1
    Join Date
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    Default 35 year rule has this finally reached a limit of what is an antique? 1985 is it?

    I know this comes up often and some people will say the club has to grow and prosper. But seriously is a 1985 Honda 750 or a 1990 Kawasaki ninja or even a 1994 Harley sportster collectible? I will say no, never will be because they just made too many and they just don't have anything special about them. Is my 2003 Anniversary Softail going to be special, nope.

    I have seen this in most automobiles past about 1978, it's just a car nothing special. Many classic car clubs drew the line at 1975. Here we are at 1983 and still going! Can't we just draw a line somewhere to preserve the whole purpose and integrity of the club. Go ahead and hit me with your best shot if you disagree.
    #7558 Take me on and you take on the whole trailer park!

  2. #2
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    I agree with you. 1975 sounds like a good cut-off date, and everything after would be 'Special Interest'.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  3. #3
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    Fifty is the new thirty-five.

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  4. #4
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    i would have to respectfully disagree, there are quite a number of, both uncommon and common of certain models of all makes post-1985 that are currently highly collectible as well as increasing in collectability. some uncommon examples would be the 1986 Ducati 750 F1 Montjuich, the 1986 F1 1987 F1 Laguna Seca, and the 1988 F1 Santa Monica, each very different yet similarly appearing machines. only 200 Montjuich's were produced, 20 came to North America, the Montjuich's were littered with magnesium parts, special factory racing heads. First year (1994) Ducati 916's, especially the Senna are already highly collectable. Certain early 90's Moto Guzzi Daytona's are highly sought after, the 2004 MGS-01 Corsa is another example, i believe 50 were built. The BMW HP2, 2008-2012 is another. i don't know the likelihood of ever seeing these bikes at an AMCA meet, but someone might someday bring something like that to show off much as i brought my Velo Thruxton, 1960 DBD34GS, and 1967 G80CS to the 1983 Lemars meet and was told "while they were nice bikes," i couldn't show them because of the 35 year rule. of the more common Japanese bikes, unmolested examples such as the 1979 Honda CBX, the 1998 first year Suzuki Hyabusa, the Kawasaki W650 twin, 1999-2007 is another example and are more likely to possibly be seen in future amca shows. imho, as time goes by, a few of the pre-1955 bikes will become ever more expensive, and pretty much of any the pre-WW II bikes will be unaffordable to old bike enthusiasts in future decades, and so bikes built in the past 2-3 decades will be what future generations can get into. even the Yamaha SR500's 1978-1981, and the SRX600, a one year U.S. 1986 model are prized. so that's my thoughts. to my way of old man thinking a 1969 Honda Z50 "monkey bike" is not worth collecting much less spending money on or showing one at an amca meet. however i think it's likely somebody might bring one to show off nd i wouldn't be surprised if one has been shown at an amca meet within the past 5 years. Z50's were made by the thousands, and today some people are super passionate about them and dump what i would consider stupid money into making one perfect. i dumped $4500 into a 1965 Yamaha Rotary Jet 80 because the Rotary Jet was my first motorcycle. i, lover of 1969 CB750 sandcasts look at them as "just an old Honda, others will have not be able to tell or care the difference between a single digit 1969 sandcast and a 1976 K6 CB750. oh well, just my two cents worth. considering my 3 Brit singles were excluded at the 1983 Lemars meet, and hurt my feelings, i would hate to see some poor young sap such as myself was excluded because some brain in the amca thought it wasn't old enough or worse yet felt any bike past a certain year wasn't special enough to merit attention. i'd like to have a Thruxton, DBD or G80CS now for what i paid sold mine for back in the 80's..... maybe the likelihood of seeing these newer European and Japanese bikes at an amca meet is low, as there are European and Japanese clubs that cater to these bikes..... hell if i know, just my two cents worth. in my case, i'll never never enter another show in my life even though some of the restorations i have sold have won multiple overall class awards at some major nationally recognized club events; in my case some wounds don't heal, but all heels can have wounds..... ha.
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 08-24-2018 at 06:11 PM. Reason: grammar error correction

  5. #5
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    When 75 out of a hundred end up in the crusher. Then they become collectable.

  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Luland View Post
    When 75 out of a hundred end up in the crusher. Then they become collectible.
    Bingo! and contemporary crushers are collisions making low production or first year models thereby affecting collectibility.

  7. #7

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    But to the young people coming into this hobby and eventually replacing us, post '80 bikes are indeed antiques.

  8. #8
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    Quote Originally Posted by jorrow View Post
    But to the young people coming into this hobby and eventually replacing us, post '80 bikes are indeed antiques.
    and i believe the 80's and even newer bikes will be a segue for inspiring interest and desire for owning a bike older than the 80's

  9. #9
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    And if my first bike was a 1985 Honda 750, it would be fun to see one restored to AMCA standards....it would bring back fond memories at least!
    Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

  10. #10
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    While my peers and I generally prefer older bikes such as what we sought and got started with and lead to joining the AMCA, I think it is important not to discourage potential new younger members by restricting their options of interest or affordability. I think it is great when a young person shows interest and puts effort into finding, repairing, and preserving whatever they can afford instead of simply being given "disposable toys".
    My 2 cents! (CDN)

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