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Thread: Gas Tank Restoration

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    288

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilcock View Post
    If it were my tank I would cap the outlet and fill the tank with 10% molasses and water and leave it there for a week or 2. Then flush it out with water. It will leave bare metal inside and not hurt the original paint.
    Tom
    I have used the molasses process to remove rust. It works very well and is gentle as well as environmentally friendly. Tom's process should work well I would just add to the solution all the way up to the top of the fill neck with some space to put on the fuel cap. Since it is a chemical reaction that creates a bit of heat and mild pressure be prepared for it when you take off the filler cap. I have only put small parts in a container of the sauce and it does a nice job removing rust from chrome. After you wash and rinse out the tank it would help to put it someplace warm or near a dehumidifier to get all the moisture out. Bare metal once exposed now to the environment could skim with light rust quickly so it would be good to get Rollo's Red Kite on the interior.

    Mike Love
    member # 19097

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Charles Town, West Virginia
    Posts
    38

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    I ordered the Red Cote and will be pulling the tanks next week. I didn't realize that stuff even fills pin holes. I used to make alot of money repairing pre '36 tanks with lead, this stuff would have saved some of those people alot of money. Thanks to all of you who helped with your suggestions.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,350

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    Quote Originally Posted by Flathead fathead View Post
    .. I didn't realize that stuff even fills pin holes.....
    Not always, FF!

    A skilled associate of mine gave up trying.

    Nothing's perfect.

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2008
    Location
    Virginia
    Posts
    492

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    Flat I wouldn't give up on doing pin hole or other tank repairs with lead. Just make sure you do it safely for you. Old school craftsmen are hard to find! I may PM you to discuss this on some tanks I have that need work. Good Luck and the molasses and Red Kote sounds like the trick.

    Tom (Rollo) Hardy
    AMCA #12766

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,350

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    Quote Originally Posted by Rollo View Post
    ...I wouldn't give up on doing pin hole or other tank repairs with lead....
    Certainly Rollo!

    I just tinned up two Perfection Heater fonts.

    Holes looked like constellations in the night sky.

    (But then I also assisted re-soldering of my associate's tragedy, before the Red Cote. So ignore me.)

    ....Cotten
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 06-27-2018 at 02:01 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
    Location
    Charles Town, West Virginia
    Posts
    38

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    I'm definately no "old school craftsman" I just knew an old auto body man who was dieing of emphysema (he said it was the bondo) who wanted to teach someone before he passed. I did it for a few years but found out I had lead levels in my blood at the high end of the normal range. Between that and casting my own bullets I had to give up something. I think I still have the tools in the back of my barn some where, I never get rid of tools or guns. I'll be glad to pass on any knowlege I can remember, the biggest thing is to get your tanks really clean.
    My tanks don't have any holes just rust so it should be an easy fix. Tin tanks aren't really an issue for me I've only had one pre 36 bike and don't expect I'll own another one.

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    137

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    Just picked up a bottle of Rusteco (they are out of Torrance CA). Using it on a stock 78 FXE tank. Going to let it sit in there for a couple more days, drain it and see how the inside looks. Doesn't harm the paint (or the environment). Not cheap by any means but is supposed to work well. Update will be coming.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jun 2015
    Posts
    288

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    Hi Flathead - I sent you a message to your inbox with a contact for someone in your Rea that may offer some help on the tank.

    Mike Love
    Member #19097

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Nov 2018
    Location
    Lowell,ma
    Posts
    24

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    I realize this is too late for you,but I used POR 15 about 10 or 12 years ago and is still good. It was around 50 $ and did a set of fat bobs and a mustang tank with one kit. Itís 3 parts and took about 6 hrs but worth it. I learned about this from a car restorer,

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,350

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    Quote Originally Posted by Jcadams View Post
    I realize this is too late for you,but I used POR 15 about 10 or 12 years ago and is still good. It was around 50 $ and did a set of fat bobs and a mustang tank with one kit. It’s 3 parts and took about 6 hrs but worth it. I learned about this from a car restorer,
    I lost big $ on POR-15, Jcadams!

    Then I used it to test my local fuel year after year by applying it and other goobers to etched glass plates.

    POR-15 invariably peeled off overnight, as shown at the bottom left in the attachment.

    Results will vary as the fuels vary.

    ....Cotten
    Attached Images Attached Images
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

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