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Thread: 68 t100r

  1. #1

    Default 68 t100r

    I am looking into the possible purchase of a none running but fairly good cosmetically 68 T100 R. I have some questions that I hope the forum can help me with.

    Bike doesn't run but does kick over and feels like it has good compression, 12K miles on odo. Anything in particular I need to look for?

    Bike has pretty good paint but has a stainless front fender and the seat interferes with the grab handle (right/wrong)?

    Going on the info given what would be a reasonable purchase price?

    Are ther any good value and appraisal guides out there today?

    RRandall

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
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    New Jersey
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    80

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    Hagerty has a pretty good valuation guide. Their valuations run from poor to concourse. Speaking for myself a motorcycle that doesn't run and has some incorrect parts would fall somewhere close to poor condition. 12k on the odo is not a lot but who knows if it is original to the bike or not. Who knows what lurks inside a motor with good compression. Plus there is no way of knowing what shape the drive train is in. With all of those unknowns the bike could be a giant money pit. Of course the owner will claim the bike ran great when parked. It probably ran better when new!! Buying a bike that doesn't run is always a crap shoot. Don't let desire overcome good sense.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Always keep in mind that it is only worth what the parts will bring if parted out. At that level it is a fair buy, at least in terms of recovering your investment if it turns out to be unrepairable for reasonable money..
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
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    451

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    Quote Originally Posted by rrandall View Post
    I am looking into the possible purchase of a none running but fairly good cosmetically 68 T100 R. I have some questions that I hope the forum can help me with.

    Bike doesn't run but does kick over and feels like it has good compression, 12K miles on odo. Anything in particular I need to look for?

    Bike has pretty good paint but has a stainless front fender and the seat interferes with the grab handle (right/wrong)?

    Going on the info given what would be a reasonable purchase price?

    Are ther any good value and appraisal guides out there today?

    RRandall
    A '68 Triumph T100R should have engine and frame #s match and range for the engine # between H57083 and H65572.
    Front fender was originally painted silver with aquamarine center stripe lined with gold as for the rear fender. But there were different things for different models and regional differences as well. Some markets had stainless steel fenders. My own '67 T100C was an "Eastern US" version and had aluminum alloy mudguards instead of the stainless steel ones on the "Western US" bikes. 15,000 miles is about time for new valves, guides and 1st oversize for pistons on these engines. A grab handle was not fitted as stock equipment.
    You don't give enough info to suggest a price. Good pictures would be needed to get even a ballpark idea of worth.
    AFJ

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Sarasota, Florida
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    Like RRandal, I'm getting very interested in a 1970 and earlier Triumph Bonneville, or Tiger. Picking up on this thread, what do the people here, that know their Triumphs think of the prices they see on ebay, and what's the ballpark, speculative estimate of the bike RRandal described. I know there are a million variables, but take a wild guess
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    There is what appears to be an exceptionally nice 66120r on my local central Jersey CL .Restored but original paint 8900.
    The nicest example I have seen pre70 winner circle caliber was 12k and not selling.
    Tom

  7. #7
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    Sep 2005
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    Thank you for the response, Tom. I'm in new territory with Triumphs, and only wish I had learned more about them years earlier. My problem with old bikes is; I'm a sucker for a basket case but as I get older, I just want something that I can ride, and enjoy without a lot of work. Thanks again.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  8. #8
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    Aug 2004
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    I'm a fan of Pre-Unit Triumphs, but there are many nice '63-'70 unit models out there. If you want a sweet rider stay away from Bonnevilles and get a nice TR6 Trophy. The 500s are tougher to find and get parts for in the US, they were not as popular as their bigger brothers. But lots of stuff is possible. I have one that is a '70s 5 speed 750 in a '68 chassis with '65 type Thunderbird sheetmetal that someone built as their ideal machine. But the early '50s stuff is my favorite.
    Ten years ago was a better time to buy, but there is a good selection out there in the 7500-9000 range. A few years back they were selling really high but have dropped off a bit although the best of them are going back to England where the market is high and availability is much lower since most were exported. A basket Triumph is hard because there are so many year to year differences, so the most complete you can find is the way to go. The least costly are '70s era but they lack the charm and good looks of the early ones. '68-'70 are the most sought after and bring the highest prices. Triumph kicked H-Ds ass in '66 at Daytona (Elmore), hence the release of the new for '67 "Daytona 500" model. They repeated in '67 (Nixon) so H-D had to loosen the purse strings to regain the title up until Honda and Yamaha kicked their ass.



    Last edited by Rubone; 08-12-2019 at 07:32 PM.
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  9. #9

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    Anticipating that someone will find fault with my remarks, as always, I'll spare myself the embarrassment of being wrong.
    Good luck with your project.
    Last edited by kitabel; 08-12-2019 at 11:23 PM.

  10. #10
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    Sep 2005
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    I appreciate everyone's comments kitabel. Very useful insights, Robbie and that is the kind of first hand info that helps. I have been looking at the Tigers and like the single carburetor. I've also heard that the 500 Daytonas are a nice, fun rider that stayed much like the early Triumphs. Well, a lot to think about, and more studying. Thanks to everyone for their comments.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

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