Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 28 of 28

Thread: 1911 Racycle

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Posts
    160

    Default

    Dick: I did not own the two Waverley v-twins that came from John Goiorno. I only wish I did. I don't own an original gas/oil tank. I only wish I did. I have a repro tank for my project. I have pictures of a couple of original gas tanks. One is the one you took at Davenport. I hope you proceed with your book. Tom

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,769

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    Can someone identify this bike, and it's year? The setting looks like the far West, or the Deep South.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Wis
    Posts
    396

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Tom Wilcock View Post
    Dick: I did not own the two Waverley v-twins that came from John Goiorno. I only wish I did. I don't own an original gas/oil tank. I only wish I did. I have a repro tank for my project. I have pictures of a couple of original gas tanks. One is the one you took at Davenport. I hope you proceed with your book. Tom
    Thanks Tom, that's what I get for not looking at my notes. My remembry is getting worse the older I get. I just remembered that a guy from Canada had bought Giorno's v-twins back in the day. I really like your copy of the 1912 PEM/Waverley sales brochure. That is one rare piece. I know of two others. My copy doesn't have the PEM stamp. Our copies are probably as rare as Tommo's Raycycle piece.

    Eric, the bike on the right I believe it is a 1913 or 14 Jefferson. By late 1914 the Waverley Mfg. Co. was already on the skids and just filling parts orders. 1914 was the last year of the GOLDEN AGE OF MOTORCYCLING. IMHO. By the way the Jefferson locals refereed to the P.E.M. as "Push Every Morning" or "Push Every Mile". The citizens of Jefferson invested a lot of their own money in the company before it went under. I'm sure it left a bad tatse in their mouths. It was underfunded from the beginning.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,769

    Default

    Thanks for the i.d. on the Jefferson, Dick. I agree with you that 1914 was the end of motorcycling's most incredible era, but it also seemed to be the end of World's age of innocence (?) before the first world war.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,769

    Default

    I just wanted to say how educational this thread has been. Getting such knowledgeable people to share their research, and hard found information is what the AMCA is all about. This is as good as it gets, and I would love to see more of this about obscure, and near forgotten gems from the pioneer days of motorcycles.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    440

    Default

    If you could identify the palm tree... maybe that could tell you the area of where it was taken. I also like the "kid" on the porch looking at the kitten. Good stuff!!
    Jim

    AMCA #6520

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,769

    Default

    I thought about that, Jim. We have big palmettos here in Florida that can look like that one when they get old. But I think palmettos are pretty hearty, and grow in a rather wide longitudinal band through the U.S. Wherever that picture was taken, it was probably in the Southern half of the U.S., and that make you wonder how a Jefferson got to the South West, or South East. That's the fun part about these priceless old pictures; speculating on who, what, where, and when.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    440

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    I thought about that, Jim. We have big palmettos here in Florida that can look like that one when they get old. But I think palmettos are pretty hearty, and grow in a rather wide longitudinal band through the U.S. Wherever that picture was taken, it was probably in the Southern half of the U.S., and that make you wonder how a Jefferson got to the South West, or South East. That's the fun part about these priceless old pictures; speculating on who, what, where, and when.
    I had no idea where those trees were indigenous too. It looks like a train station. I 'think' that may be a ticket window just to the left of the palm tree and a bulletin board to the right of it. OR... maybe there are enough points that we could identify the fingerprint going over the palm tree?? LOL
    Jim

    AMCA #6520

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •