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Thread: Fitting front fender '47 Chief

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Orange County, CA
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    63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bills37 View Post
    This is a perfect place to put a plastic or Teflon spacer. Preferably black so they would blend in with the forks. Be advised that you can over-scrutinize an issue when it's sitting in the glaring light of a shop on a stand. Something like an 1/8" spacer cleverly camouflage would never be noticed unless it was being judged. My 2 cents worth.
    Oh and the bike is looking great.
    Thanks for the advice and comment. Spacers are the plan.

    You're right on with the comment about over-scrutinizing in the shop on a lift. When I began my goal was to end up with a good looking, great riding bike keeping it original using as many original parts as possible. But sometimes I do find myself being too critical. Guess it's because I've spent too much time seeing the great work of many on this site.

    Had no intention of showing the bike, but I've gotten into learning and being able to identify original parts from repops. After attending Dixon and hearing others experiences I have given some thought to having it judged just to see how well I did, but really focused on having a rider.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    63

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    Quote Originally Posted by PRG View Post
    Howdy sir,

    Have not seen an early IH repop, do they come with any mounting holes already drilled for reference or is the owner required to fit it entirely free hand? If the latter I'd humbly suggest dropping the rear of the bike on the bench and then compressing the front suspension with ratchet straps so the shackle angles mimick that of a complete (heavy) machine. This will provide the best insurance against that situation you see with rear luggage rack mountings being for or aft of perfect parallel to the ground and make comparisons to original machine mounting reference points easier.

    Also know you are aware that the top shackles are longer on 47-48 models resulting in the fork blades being more vertical in side view than the 46 thus changing the appearance. Some have been caught on this detail when measuring the distance from the rear fender tip to front engine mounting bolt at the frame using 46 distances on 47/48's resulting in the nose of the fender too forward and wheel positioned to far back within the fender in side view.
    Great advice Peter, and good eye!

    I do have '46 shakes on my '47. Going to trade someone for a set of '47s, just haven't gotten around to having him dig them up.

    Can't believe I didn't think about having the bike on the bench with the suspension compression to simulate the final stance when I was spending hours trying to get everything lined up.

    I do plan on checking it again with the bike in the correct stance.

    Thanks.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    63

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    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    I think Peter gives very good advice. My opinion is strictly aesthetic but the front fender looks a bit low, and tire hugging. Full fender Indian front fenders can be very different from bike to bike and from assembler, to assembler. Just my opinion. Love your bike, though.
    Thanks Eric.

    I was trying to raise the fender slightly, but ran out of fender where it mounts to the brake plate. After looking a dozens of pictures of original bikes my goal was to have the bottom rear of the fender close to parallel to the ground, and with the end of the arc where the moulding ends flowing into the top of the tire.

    Here's where i ended up yesterday after cutting the square round holes for the brake plate and drilling the hole for the mount on the other side. Hope it still looks good once I have the correct upper shackles and the bike is on the ground.
    Screen Shot 2017-07-10 at 7.16.57 AM.jpg

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    63

    Default Making a career out of this!

    As per Peter's advice I've dropped the bike on the lift and slightly compressed the front end. I still have the '46 top shakes, so once I change to the '47 I'm assuming that it will bring the wheel approximately .5" back.

    Here's a couple of photos showing the current 3.5"+ space between the rear tip of the fender and the frame, and also a shot showing the front tip in relation to the tire. I can't move the fender any higher because the post from the brake plate is already right at the edge of the fender.

    Overall I'm happy with this current fit and I like the way the arc at the front of the fender is ending at the top of the tire, but I'm concerned that once the crashbar (which I don't have yet) is installed there may not be enough clearance to the fender. Looked at a lot of pictures but its hard to find a straight on shot to give me a good view of the clearance.

    Looking more some more advice before I drill the top mount holes and finalize everything.
    Thanks!
    Terry
    IMG_3968.jpgIMG_3969.jpgIMG_3970.jpgIMG_3975.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Elk Plain, WA.
    Posts
    40

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    This thread caught my eye as I am building my basket case '46 with some left over '47 parts threw in by mistake.
    What I found:

    1946 upper shackles are 4"
    1947/48 upper shackles 4 3/8"

    46-47-48 Lowers all 4 11/16"

    Hatfield also mentions the change change as being 1/2 inch longer link in '47 and through 1948 girder fronts. I have read it somewhere that it was changed due to handling issues but I cannot recall where I read that. I don't know about the side car handling with a girder front, anyone have more info on that?

    Nice looking build, gives me inspiration to make mine as nice.
    Boone member #15941
    1946 Chief Basket builder
    1939/47 Chief Bobber
    1953 Blackhawk Chief
    1997 HD Roadking

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2016
    Location
    Orange County, CA
    Posts
    63

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    Quote Originally Posted by Americanrider View Post
    This thread caught my eye as I am building my basket case '46 with some left over '47 parts threw in by mistake.
    What I found:

    1946 upper shackles are 4"
    1947/48 upper shackles 4 3/8"

    46-47-48 Lowers all 4 11/16"

    Hatfield also mentions the change change as being 1/2 inch longer link in '47 and through 1948 girder fronts. I have read it somewhere that it was changed due to handling issues but I cannot recall where I read that. I don't know about the side car handling with a girder front, anyone have more info on that?

    Nice looking build, gives me inspiration to make mine as nice.
    With the shorter upper shackles the top bar of the forks may also hit & dent the shock. My current shakles are the shorter '46 ones, so on the hunt for a pair for '47's. Hard to find becasue it looks like many '46 owners have made the switch.

    Thanks for your comments. Waiting on the motor rebuild and the tank repairs then I can start moving ahead again. Driving me nuts not having something to work on, guess I need another project to fill the wait time!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jul 2010
    Location
    Vermont
    Posts
    577

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    Quote Originally Posted by TH47Indy View Post
    With the shorter upper shackles the top bar of the forks may also hit & dent the shock.
    ...especially when you encounter one of those spine jarring, teeth grinding surprise potholes that make you wonder why you don't have a flat tire!
    Pisten Bulley is Harry Roberts in Vermont.

  8. #18

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    Howdy sir,

    Absolutely no handling issues with the 346, prefer it to any of the 47/later girder/hydraulics which I've owned/ridden extensively. The 47-48 change, reducing trail, was made to sharpen the turn in to hopefully mimick the agile handling of the newly arriving agile British machines. It was essentially a pointless exercise in light of the other factors of weight, 5 X 16's, length of wheelbase, 3 speed handshift etc. A properly setup 346 is a delightful relaxed road machine with response commensurate with one's expectations in light of the above.

    Where folks compromise the handling portion of this setup when assembling baskets is substituting the shorter (1/2") lower fork spring seat (764009) from the more readily available 47 later for the proper 7/8" long one. Shock fouling realistically only occurs on machines topping out on rebound because of worn out units.....or, and this may happen annoyingly on every ride, when cresting a rise abruptly at speed and getting air.

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