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Thread: 1930 V Klaxon 11 mounting question

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    25

    Default 1930 V Klaxon 11 mounting question

    Hoping someone can clarify the correct order / position of the 4861-29 horn bracket springs and the 4862-29 straight spring plate when mounting the Klaxon 11 on a 30 V series. To save you some writing I will take a crack at it that way you only need to correct / clarify if I'm right and where I'm wrong or don't know etc. From front to rear at the right or left horn bracket I believe it goes - 0307A spring plate to bracket rivet, 4862-29 straight plate, 4861-29 horn bracket spring, 4862-29, 4859-36A or 4860-36A horn bracket, 4862-29, 4861-29, 4862-29, lock washer, nut. That accounts for two horn bracket springs and four straight plates per side. NOW - what happens at the Klaxon? does the front horn bracket spring go on the face of the projector 4809-29 and the rear horn bracket spring go against the back of the horn body 4803-29? Thanks in advance.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,129

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    Dear Bob, I've got a 1930 C on the bench here still with its original horn brackets. There are just two flat springs and two flat spring plates per side. The flat springs are placed either side of the horn bracket, then a straight spring plate either side, then the rivets are put through to join the assembly. It looks like the rivets have the heads at the rear and have been peened over at the front. Horn has been replaced, but it looks like one flat spring each side, then the fixing screws put through. I can post a picture if you need one.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    25

    Default

    Thank-you Steve. I understand the bracket side clearly but just want to clarify that the horn bracket spring is installed such that it is showing on the front of the projector?
    A pic of your Klaxon might be great for all of us.

  4. #4

    Default

    Steve S, think you can get us a pic of the assembly,? I also want to assemble mine correctly.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    25

    Default

    I'd be happy to send you a pick of mine just recently finished if I could figure the image attachment?


    /Users/AppletonContracting/Pictures/Photos Library.photoslibrary/Thumbnails/2017/12/04/20171204-011406/PqoSVRIJR22J1jTO56MC9Q/thumb_20171203_160922_1024.jpg
    Attached Images Attached Images

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    25

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    Sorry about the Rickman pic. Not sorry its in the garage though.

    Bob Appleton
    aclmotorcyclecollection.com

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
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    Dear Bob, I can understand showing off the Rickman... Should be flat/dull nickel on the screws if you want nitpicking feedback. Happy New Year to you and all our readers.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    25

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    Hi Steve, Happy New Year to you and others as well. Matte nickel is difficult these days but just recently I did find a plater who can do it.
    The norm are chrome platers who use the correct three part process and stop after the copper and the nickel. Its the surface prep that will dictate the degree of matte when finished. i.e. blasted dull and slightly rough will get a dull flat look. I have found bead blasting after nickel plating with a #10 bead either first or second past to dumb the finish down to be pretty decently. To some degree some work with 0000 steel wool as well. Not to much of a worry bead blasting as the surface is very hard but one has to experiment. Hate cad, love nickel. wish HD used it more. I have eased back a bit from my fanatical days but indeed these screws are getting redone.
    Thanks as always for your input.


    Bob Appleton
    www.aclmotorcyclecollection.com

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
    Posts
    1,129

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    Dear Bob, back in the day, Watts nickel gave a flat finish, which was then polished to give bright nickel on for instance the handlebar spirals. Today the plating solution includes chemical brighteners so you get bright nickel in one go. Most platers do this, so you end up with those garish restorations of earlier Harleys and Indians with all the small parts bright nickelled. My plater is still old school so runs two nickel lines, one bright and one dull.

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