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Thread: 1966 Shovel engine rebuild

  1. #11
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    That is cool, Steve! I'd like to see more. Always interesting to see what you've got going on!
    Dale

  2. #12
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    To me, there looks to be 3 different fixtures, not jigs, a jig guides a tool. Now there may be jigs attached to fixtures, for example, a drill hole jig.
    With that being said, the pieces being machined do not look familiar to me, but just may after studying them for a bit. Please do not give up the answer, to the puzzle, quite yet.

    Thanks
    Last edited by ryan; 06-18-2017 at 01:27 PM. Reason: Grammer

  3. #13
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    Upper Yarra Valley, Victoria. Australia
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    OK. While your all going cross eyed trying to work out what the "Fixture" is for, I got on with the next job with this engine.
    This picture almost makes it look like you could take the helicoil out and put a new one in. But there are no threads left for the helicoil to screw into so....some rhinoplasti is needed.

    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  4. #14
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    Mar 2017
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    Steve,
    I agree on the crossed eyed work on figuring them out, I missed where you had already called out the number 3. So I am the goof on that one and I am still at a loss.

    In your current case, will you have to machine out your hole and the outer most part of the casting to be able to fill it with weld and remachine your hole? Also if you do have to go that far, will you also check the bore of the exhaust port to see if it needs addressed as well? Will you do the work or farm it out? Have you ever heard the saying, "just get out of your head and do it?" I have that issue quite often, for instance, why set up to machine what the hand can do. Ya get my drift?

  5. #15
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    Mar 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Little View Post
    OK. While your all going cross eyed trying to work out what the "Fixture" is for, I got on with the next job with this engine.
    This picture almost makes it look like you could take the helicoil out and put a new one in. But there are no threads left for the helicoil to screw into so....some rhinoplasti is needed.

    Just a mindless thought here because I am almost sure you will not have enough meat for a 1\2" tap. If you do have enough meat for a half inch tap, a steak pocket can be used.

  6. #16
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    Mar 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Little View Post
    Thanks Ryan.
    I appreciate you taking the time to have some input, and give tips garnered from your machining history.

    For those that know what is involved, here's some industrial art. 3 jigs from the frame business. There are probably 25 or 30 jigs stacked in the shelves.


    Anyone want to guess what the first jig is for.



    Ignore the red arrow in the second picture. These pictures are from the machinists files and were used to was a prompt his memory on how to set up.






    Cool huh!
    Yes,very cool. The 2nd one is for the rear rigid frame casting, the last one is for the front lower frame casting and the first one still illudes me.

  7. #17
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    Decided to go the welding route.
    Ground the side out of the hole to get the TIG electrode as close as possible to the other side, but ended up widening it a bit more to make room for the nozzle.









    The kooky guy inside my head was trying to get me to cut the face down below that little bit of undercut. But after a short wrestle and quiet chat with ourselves we decided that it will be alright.



    After a bit of file work and brass wire wheel in the die grinder, it should pass at a glance.
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  8. #18
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    After blowing off the head I was about to wash it but decided to take another look. There looks to be a couple of dark areas on the head gasket surface and multiple scratch (file?) marks. I find that I spend half my time during a rebuild, undoing previous builders mischief.



    Some coarse lapping paste and a quick couple of turns to see what a witness mark will tell me.



    Yep! Some circle work is needed












    Now that the mess is wiped up, I can get it in the parts washer.
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  9. #19
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    Apr 2008
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    Quote Originally Posted by painterdale View Post
    That is cool, Steve! I'd like to see more. Always interesting to see what you've got going on!
    Dale
    Hi Dale.
    Good to see your name come up on the screen.
    Thanks for the encouragement and getting in here with us.
    Steve
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  10. #20
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    Mar 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by ryan View Post
    Steve,
    Have you ever heard the saying, "just get out of your head and do it?" I have that issue quite often, for instance, why set up to machine what the hand can do. Ya get my drift?
    Steve,
    This quote was solely made about me, not anyone else. I should have clarified that more clearly.
    Now about the fine work you are now doing, I would have never thought about using lapping compound to straighten out the head surfaces because I never use lapping compound on anything.
    I think you did a wonderful job on welding and hand finishing your weld on the stud hole. Now here is where my quote and question lies: Are you going to set the head up on a sine plate with an angle plate to drill your hole or are you going to try to take the chance and try to just drill it by hand and hope for the best and maybe get lucky? I will guess the prior of the two, although I could be wrong.
    I look forward to seeing more of your work Steve and thanks for sharing with us!

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