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Thread: 1928 JD Motor

  1. #21

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    Colony Machine www.colonymachine.com makes a tool for the slotted nuts. Their part number 2594-1 on page 40 of their current online catalog.
    The pinion gear is just a light press onto the pinion shaft but the large headed screw needs to be removed first. This is a LEFT HAND THREAD screw and is usually somewhat tight.
    The cracks around the pinion shaft and breather gear will need to be welded and machined.
    There's a good guy here in Ohio for this if you can't find someone local.
    You're in California, right?
    Cracks around the breather are common. Around the pinion, not so much.
    Mark

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Jun 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by MMasa View Post
    Colony Machine www.colonymachine.com makes a tool for the slotted nuts. Their part number 2594-1 on page 40 of their current online catalog.
    The pinion gear is just a light press onto the pinion shaft but the large headed screw needs to be removed first. This is a LEFT HAND THREAD screw and is usually somewhat tight.
    The cracks around the pinion shaft and breather gear will need to be welded and machined.
    There's a good guy here in Ohio for this if you can't find someone local.
    You're in California, right?
    Cracks around the breather are common. Around the pinion, not so much.
    Mark
    Mark, thank you I will order that tool from Colony Machine. I am in California, I do know some welders. Do you think I need to take it to a welder that usually repairs engines? Or will a good aluminum welder be able to get the job done? Thanks again for your help!

  3. #23

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    You should use someone who repairs early engine cases. They will also need some machine work done afterward.
    Are u in northern or Southern California?

  4. #24
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    Jun 2017
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    Ok thats what I thought. I'm in Southern California.

  5. #25

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    Do you know George Hood?
    He's in SO-CAL and would probably know of a good local resource.
    If not, email or PM me and I can get you his contact info.
    Mark

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    480

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    not to hijack Mitch's thread, but what are the reasons for cracking around the rotary breather and the pinion shaft ?

    although the cracking in the breather area is most often seen, the rotary breather it's self doesn't seem like there would be that much load to area.

    is the casting design it's self contribute to cracking ? or is it also in part due to the cast aluminum of those times not being up to the task?

    or is it debris in the oil causing undue loading of the shaft that stresses the casting or a tooth breaks off a gear and gets jammed in the other teeth of the gears........?

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Nov 2015
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    16

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    I'm going through the process of repairing cracks right now. I'm stumped on how to remove all the oil from the casting as it is almost a sponge. Maybe vapor degreasing? I've had it in the oven a dozen times and the welds are turning out like chicken poo, also they spur more cracks during the welding (casting is hot). After a few rounds of welding and sanding its getting there. Most aluminum welders are used to fresh oil free castings so this old stuff throws them for a loop.

    Steve, I've heard it's old piston rings that get chewed up and get sucked into the breather gear as the crank case pressure is expelled. The piece of ring gets stuck and BAM! Shes cracked.

    Bummer about your pinion area being cracked...

  8. #28
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    Aug 2013
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    Ouch ! I felt that BAM! part clean through my smart phone.....

  9. #29
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    Jun 2017
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    Quote Originally Posted by whp View Post
    I'm going through the process of repairing cracks right now. I'm stumped on how to remove all the oil from the casting as it is almost a sponge. Maybe vapor degreasing? I've had it in the oven a dozen times and the welds are turning out like chicken poo, also they spur more cracks during the welding (casting is hot). After a few rounds of welding and sanding its getting there. Most aluminum welders are used to fresh oil free castings so this old stuff throws them for a loop.

    Steve, I've heard it's old piston rings that get chewed up and get sucked into the breather gear as the crank case pressure is expelled. The piece of ring gets stuck and BAM! Shes cracked.

    Bummer about your pinion area being cracked...
    WHP and Steve,
    I am bummed about the cracks too. Once I split the cases I will have a better idea about how far the cracks actually go. Luckily most of the cracks appear to be very thin hairline cracks, which hopefully can be repaired. WHP, do you have any pictures of your motor and your welds? I ordered the tool for the engine case slotted nuts, once I get that I will have a better idea about the cracks. Thank you guys for your help and sharing your experiences

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    480

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    Mitchell, i'm really happy to see you keep coming back and having the enthusiasm.

    yes. cracks. i know the feeling. Be ye not faint of heart. more than one of us started with a few damaged parts that began our conquest.

    after i got my pieces home in 2013, when i discovered the pair of V cracks that extended into the belly of my LH case, my heart sank into my shoes for a brief moment.

    it's nothing that time, research, networking, persistence, perseverance and money can't fix. most rewarding will be everything you learn along the way, the great people you'll meet and when you complete the project, you'll know far more than you ever knew before you began. make the project as fun as you can !

    the really great thing you have in your favor, you are 21 years young ! not many your age have the opportunity you have. you don't have to get the project done by next Thursday. just keep picking away at the pile, one part, one deliberate move at a time. each part you spend time repairing and fitting to another part is another triumph accomplished in the journey. another nice thing, you can make the bike what you want it to be and as time goes by, change it into something else. it can start out as an incomplete rider or a bobber, the first end result doesn't have to be a perfect restoration, but over time, if you wish, you can make it so.

    i dreamt about having a JD for most of my life. the last 10 years, i KNEW i had to have one, i decided in my late 50's i wanted to have a JD to ride before i turned 66. i was 61 when i started my project. after i got my pieces, i kept the project on a constant move, juggling various aspects and finished when i am now 65....

    imo, there's nothing more gorgeous than a restored IoE JD engine......

    here's a factory pic of a 27JD engine 27 JD engine.jpg

    and my engine taken this past March 20170306_113934.jpg
    Last edited by Steve Swan; 07-07-2017 at 01:57 AM. Reason: grammar

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