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Thread: clutch slip

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    141

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    On my 69 FLHB sidecar bike, with a foot clutch and 3R tranny, I had to finally go with the original nos asbestos 3.5 clutches earlier setup from my 5 disk, aftermarket nonspring steels, aluminium pressure plate. I also run a 5 stud clutch hub with a plastic ram-jet clutch basket retainer. The adjustments to the clutch system were by the book and amazingly worked.
    Now I have to change from the foot clutch to a non handlebar hand clutch and am debating on using a mousetrap or a mousetrap eliminator, 99% sure on the mousetrap, but that is a different story.
    If you are having oil blow back between your clutches from the compensating chain oiler, Harley made a bolt on steel baffle plate, part number 60566-74, to deflect the oil from doing so, but cannot be added when the chain shoe is flipped for a lesser tooth compensating sprocket.
    Again, I would really have your motor looked at or maybe even torn back down and looked at. I know you will be out labor, but better than being out parts and labor. Just my 2 cents.

    Good luck and best wishes!
    Last edited by ryan; 06-09-2017 at 01:47 PM.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    3,305

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    Ryan!

    I agree totally that a 4-plate clutch has proven for me to be superior for a hack, and a "basket retainer" is a great idea, (especially for a foot-clutch).

    But after-market aluminum pressure plates are often hit-and-miss; You were lucky.

    As far as the 5-stud gimmick, please consider: Would you rather level a table with three legs, or five?

    ...Cotten
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 06-09-2017 at 01:58 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2017
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    141

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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    Ryan!

    I agree totally that a 4-plate clutch has proven for me to be superior for a hack, and a "basket retainer" is a great idea, (especially for a foot-clutch).

    But after-market aluminum pressure plates are often hit-and-miss; You were lucky.

    As far as the 5-stud gimmick, please consider: Would you rather level a table with three legs, or five?

    ...Cotten
    Cotten,
    Thanks for the info and the table analogy on the clutch hub. I bought the new 5 finger hub and ALU pressure plate off a guy really cheap a d decided to give them a try. I did not use the pressure plate stud with the ball bearing.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
    Location
    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
    Posts
    2,176

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    I am a firm believer in 3 stud hubs and no gimmick crap (big Fix, Tamers, etc) and have never had an issue with everything from my UL w/SC to my stroker rigs. Proper chain alignment and proper adjustment are all you need. I run 5 plate '68 up type clutches and soft springs in everything, and have for 4+ decades..
    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  5. #15

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    Howdy chaps,

    A key change being overlooked here is that he replaced his comp sprocket with a solid drive. Indian can't be admired for much if any innovation after the 20's but they did choose the right description for one of their last gasp efforts in 1950 with the intro of the 80 inch motor and their version of a compensator sprocket called the torque evenor. On a graph every undampened power pulse of a v twin causes a torque peak for which the clutch must designed to hold that spike or every incremental slip accumulates leading to general glazing. The clutch on that shovel was designed for a torque input buffered by cam operated comp sprocket on a chain primary or the 6 rubber puck on an FXSB. It will not work solid. To give you some idea of how dampening those primary pulses - or more evening them out as Indian once described it - can reduce the clamping pressure required, a solid drive 80 inch hot rod Chief requires pretty much all 16 springs on a Qua sintered bronze, with a torque evenor, 12. With a 74 inch motor on a Southern Products PowerFlow you can get by with 8. It's about breakaway stiction.

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    3,305

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    Compensators are great, of course, Peter!

    But my extended experience with H-D's admirable clutch, and both kinds of sprockets, tells me that a solid sprocket shouldn't cause slippage in itself.
    Especially under normal duty, compared to sidecar duty, racing abuse, etc.

    And Folks, basket retainers are far from a 'gimmick'.
    Although the short throw of hand clutches limits the 'walk' of the basket side to side to a degree, they still allow the chain to flex sideways while the clutch is pulled.
    A footclutch can allow a great deal of sideways travel for the basket, wearing the chain on the sides of its links. I have found folks who fear they must rely on the pedal stuck heel-down instead of getting into neutral at a stop, accelerate this wear dramatically.

    They need more experience, or at least more money.

    A basket retainer, such as a "Tamer", alleviates this greatly.
    Most pedals had an extra hole for a pin to limit pedal travel between the edges of the bracket, thus limiting the side travel of the basket, but for some reason, few people used it.

    Even "The Big Fix" has its time and place: The long rollers can be used to bridge over wear tracks in baskets and upon hubs for more life.
    But neither of these innovations would cure a clutch slipping for other reasons.

    Electricnblue!

    Please make certain that there is some freeplay in your linkage between the rod end and the release lever over the transmission, so you are not riding on the throw-out bearing.

    ....Cotten
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 06-10-2017 at 12:24 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upper Yarra Valley, Victoria. Australia
    Posts
    829

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    Last year I was in the final stages of assembling my 65 Pan and time was getting short before a run.
    I have 4 original clutch hubs that I've picked up at swap meets. If I was to use one of these I would have to replace broken fingers etc. Instead of going that route, I opted for a complete aftermarket clutch hub ( yes I know...feel free to slap me up the back of the head).
    Out of the box it looked great, and after a light lap of hub to shaft, I got them nicely acquainted.
    It fitted with very little bearing surface run out. I cleaned up some original plates and springs and from the very first gear change, it selected and changed like silk. Happy chappy. This was a new engine and trans and I'm gentle for the first 1000 miles, but at 400 miles my clutch started to grunt into first, hard first second changes, snatching at lights, and clutch slippage up hills during spirited acceleration. Snatching is normally a symptom of clutch plates hanging in wear ruts in clutch fingers, but I had a new clutch hub so it couldn't be my problem...right?
    I kept thinking I had the mousetrap adjusted wrong and redid it 3 or 4 times. I can report that at 1200 miles I have ruts ranging from 008 to 010 deep on each finger of this new hub. The dopes aren't hardening the fingers. This probably means that replacement fingers are also not hardened. The hub came from the company you have probably all guessed.
    Electricinblue this might not be your exact problem but it might help someone else.
    Steve
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  8. #18

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    thanks for the info , will do some time in the garage and will post what I can find ,have 3 other running bikes but love my 67 . quick note ? the compensator takes some shock out of the drive train ????

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