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Thread: Aaaw no! Hes at it again.

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
    Posts
    139

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    Thank you I was close. I have also taken old junk gas caps, removed the chrome outer and then turn or grind the inner part down to a littler smaller than the OD. of the filler bung.
    Weld a nut to the top and use the rubber gasket to seal the tank when blasting to keep the sand out. I then use them when painting to keep paint out and give a nice blend from paint to bare steel without the raw tape line. And the nut gives you a way to help hang the tank to paint.
    Jim D

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upper Yarra Valley, Victoria. Australia
    Posts
    855

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    Out of interest, I would be interested to read other members time spent on restoring a star hub from start to finish?
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    543

    Default

    I found some appropriately sized rubber stoppers to drive into the bore on each side, for blasting. Masking tape for painting.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upper Yarra Valley, Victoria. Australia
    Posts
    855

    Default

    Hi Rooster.
    I used stuff from around the workshop, and enjoy the challenge of design and manufacture.

    It can be a poor odds lottery when buying assembled star hubs on eBay, or for that matter, from a swap meet.
    Here is a list of work I performed on these hubs.
    Disassemble, wash, dry, and inspect internal parts, Throw most of it in the bin.
    Lap both races to get them true and wash and dry again.
    Wash rust inhibitor off new hub sleeve and fit 4 different sets of rollers to achieve plug fit to brake side.
    Wash oil off new rollers and fit 4 different sets to achieve plug fit to star side.
    Fit the inner sleeve and bearing assembly to the brake side with the thrust washer and circlip. Fit seal retainer and circlip without cork seal. Flip the hub over and fit the bearing assembly to star side and set side clearance with shims.
    Disassemble and bag all parts in labeled zip lock bags.
    Fit blasting kit to each hub and sand blast both hubs and star covers.
    Blow off dust and wipe with Prepsol.
    Paint and air dry. Then oven dry.
    Remove paint masking kit from hubs.
    Clean hubs with acertone.
    Clean out old grease from grease nipple and fit to hub.
    Clean and grease all brake side parts and fit.
    Clean and grease all star side parts and fit.
    Fill with grease.

    Are star hubs worth a thousand bucks each or am I doing it wrong?

    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    543

    Default

    I do very much the same, with the exception of machine work. However, the star cover and screws get Parkerized. I don't know if the hub alone is worth a grand, but I think a properly rebuilt and restored wheel, with a tire installed sure is. But I'm not a professional, just an everyday guy...

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