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Thread: My 1938/39 Triumph. A Retrospective Review.

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2015
    Location
    NW Lower Michigan
    Posts
    12

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    What a lovely job, you should be very proud.
    Scott

  2. #22

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    That's a beautiful machine. Lovely. Nice job.




    Kevin


    .

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Blighty
    Posts
    226

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    Thanks for the comments guys. I was just thinking about waking the Triumph up from its winter sleep. I have a couple of minor jobs to do so when I have done them I will post an update.

    John

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,769

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    I have a good friend here in Florida who is British, and a motorcycle collector. I have told him many times; how can a Brit, who loves motorcycles, not have a Triumph in his collection

    John, your Triumph is stunning, and your documentation is excellent, as it was with your J model Harley. When you look at the beautiful lines of that bike, you wonder how modern motorcycle design got so out of touch with classic styling.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Blighty
    Posts
    226

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    Hello folks, I said I would do an update.

    A few weeks ago I serviced the Triumph and did a couple of jobs i have been meaning to do for a while.

    First up was the sump plate. There are 2 issues here. First, the standard plate is pressed steel and is prone to warping slightly and leaking. Mine is no exception. One remedy is to fit a machined alloy plate which is what I did. Also the studs go through the cases and oil gets down the threads and leaks. My remedy for this was to fit the studs using Delta 333 pipe sealant. I am a big fan of Delta sealants, for most applications they are as good as the equivalent Loctite product but much cheaper.

    Old plate



    Old vs New




    However I ran into another problem. There is a gauze filter in the sump that the scavenge pipe sucks oil back to the tank through. When I took mine off I noticed that the gauze was starting to separate from the brass plate. When I investigated it came completely away with almost no effort. It seems that this repop filter is just glued together. The originals are soldered. I thought about soldering it back together but I couldnít get the glue off the gauze so i bought a better quality item from SRM made of stainless steel and it is crimped together.

    Old one



    Broken.



    New one



    This is where it fits. You can just see the scavenge pipe.




    I also needed to put a new gasket on one of the pushrod tubes.


    Here is the front tube.




    Gasket kits include rubber gaskets for top and bottom of the tube but I always had trouble sealing the top. Oliver Barnes at TriSupply advised me that the early bikes had a thick paper gasket (between 5/32" and 3/16") and he sold me some and it fixed them. However last time I had the top off the engine I reused a gasket and had a weep so i needed to replace it. Now the gaskets are, for what they are, not cheap. Ok they are not exactly expensive but I took the time to make a die and bought some paper and now I can cut as many as I like for the cost of a couple of bought ones (if you include the postage)

    Here are 2 bottom gaskets to the left hand side, you can see that they are thicker. To the right is a modern top gasket and a paper one. The paper ones are, in my experience, much more effective.



    Here is the die. Its just made from scrap and is in 2 parts which makes getting the gaskets out of it easier and also makes making it easier.



    Last job is something that i do every year which is boil my petrol tap. These old Ewarts taps have a cork seal inside and they dry out and shrink, especially when I drain the fuel over winter. When they shrink they leak and the best method to fix this is to boil the cork for 20 mins. This usually make the cork OK for another year.

    Tap


  6. #26
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Blighty
    Posts
    226

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    Plunger with cork seal.



    Boiling



    After boiling. You can see it has swollen up.



    As I said this usually sorts it for a year.

    I planned to go for the first proper ride out of the year today (Sunday) so I filled the tank right up and gave the bike a quick check over on Saturday. After I had parked it in the garage for a short time I could smell petrol. Turns out the cork has reached the end of its life. I have a new cork but the parts are riveted together. Looking through my box of taps I noticed I had another plunger that had been taken apart and soldered back together so I used that plunger with the new cork and soldered it together. The tap is now quite stiff but it seals fine and no boiling required. I think I could make a new plunger with O rings the next time I have a problem so that is a job for the future.

    Close up of old cork on the soldered plunger.




    Old cork. I forgot to take a picture of the old and new corks together. the new one is much bigger.



    Replacement plunger, note solder.



    As opposed to the original riveted construction.



    So I went out with the local section of the VMCC. Liken that to your local chapter of the AMCA. It was a short run of about 35 miles although they were 35 miles of English lanes like this so even though it was a short ride it was nice. Also its about 20 miles each way from my mouse to where we met so I did about 75 miles all in.

    Here is the sort of road for the most part of the run. The width is the same as the width of one car.



    I didnt have a route holder so i had to follow someone who did. At first I was behind a 1918 Triumph doing only about 30 mph. Then a faster group went by so i tagged onto the back of them. They were much newer bikes, a 1970's 750 Honda, a Trident, another Honda etc. They were probably going at a comfortable pace for them but i had to work hard to keep up. I had enough GO but was lacking in the STOP department. Its fair to say that for at least 20 of the 35 miles I gave the Triumph a hard ride with a couple of "moments" when my muscle memory went for the gear change rather than the brake. It didnít miss a beat and is running better than ever.

    Home



    Needs a clean



    This afternoon I managed to do some work on a milling machine that I am doing up so all in all today has been a good day.

    John

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