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Thread: Schebler Air Valve Casting Part Needed

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    32

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    Hello Friends
    I'm back from a great AMCA ride hosted by the Roosevelt Chapter. Day one I put 160 miles on my 1915 HD twin. The next day my butt was so sore I went to a more comfortable ride. Feeling better by day 3 I rode my 1920 HD J 90 miles. All rides were successfully done without a break down.

    You guys need to listen to Mr. Cotten. I have a 10-40 nut. (not very common in todays market) And the nut used a brass pin to keep it in place. I've had it apart before and at the time the pin seemed to fit just fine. What the heck it's lasted almost 100 years! Almost is the key word here. God only knows where the pin is now and I'm not loosing any sleep over it. Sooo if anyone has a 10-40 nut let me know.

    In case you're wondering the air valve that came apart was on my 1920. The 1915 uses the same air valve. I just switched them on this weeks ride.

    Love all your comments!
    NL967A

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,166

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    All I can say is, if you're trying to keep an antique motorcycle on the road, you should have a lathe, and at least a drill press. . . And, have a passing idea of how to use them. You can buy a 10-40 tap from McMaster Carr which makes 50% of making your own nut possible. Scheblers I have had use a pin through the nut and valve stem, although a cotter pin, or twisted wire would work just as well. Making your own parts is about as satisfying as anything you can do in this old bike hobby.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,313

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    Of course, Folks,..

    I am well stocked with both nuts, but by policy I only supply hardware with my services.

    Hope you all understand,

    ....Cotten
    PS: Eric!
    Please remember that these poppet valves can 'hammer' with every piston stroke. Twisted wire or a cotter key should get down the road, but a solid pin peened at both ends works best, or solder of course.
    The tricky part is to get it at the right spot for the right spring tension.
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 09-09-2016 at 06:47 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Blighty
    Posts
    272

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    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    All I can say is, if you're trying to keep an antique motorcycle on the road, you should have a lathe, and at least a drill press. . . ................

    Making your own parts is about as satisfying as anything you can do in this old bike hobby.
    NL967A, this is a good piece of advice.

    John

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,313

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    My philosophy Folks,...

    Is to invest in tools that make more tools; If I don't make a new tool each day, my day was wasted.

    ....Cotten
    PS: Today, I hope to find time to harden my die for putting "teeth" on later floatlevers like the early Scheblers used to hold the float securely.
    The design was probably abandoned because it often broke through the cork's coating, but with few adhesives available today that withstand P4gas, and the modern foam that cannot be soaked, it seems like the time to return to the practice.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 09-10-2016 at 09:12 AM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    North Dakota
    Posts
    32

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    Hello My Friends
    I appreciate your comments on "tools of the trade". This whole thread started with me asking for information on a nut! I didn't realize the extent of comments I would receive. Here's a little more information about my air valve misfortune. When a search locally for a 10-40 nut came up short. I purchased a 10-32 bolt and nut the same length as my old one. I rounded the bolt head, braised on another thumb washer, drill a hole and inserted a small steel pin and welded that to the head. Assembled the parts and I'm back in business. Took a test ride and the '20 ran great. Then I thought I wonder if the '15 air valve is the same as the '20. Did a quick switch and adjustments and that worked great as well. Lot's of options now. And yes I had a good feeling about solving a small problem. I learned I didn't own a 10-40 tap or die which Granger is now supplying. I like tools too! But...now I look on the bench and here is a perfectly good air valve shaft without a nut. So I say to myself "I'll post a request on the Forum for a nut."
    Have a good week Friends
    NL967A

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