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Thread: 1920 Harley Model F

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
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    Blighty
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    221

    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    Quote Originally Posted by exeric View Post
    John, is that a black pin stripe on the side of the frame tube?
    exeric, the stripe is more niticable in the picture than to the eye. Here are some more pictures







    I would say that there is/used to be a stripe on the frame tube. Its the same on both sides and is uniform/even.

    Am I right in assuming that this is not standard?



    Quote Originally Posted by ChrisLewis View Post
    Hi
    Try Steve at MTS for the tank repairs, he did my WLA and they came out like new, easy to find on the Web.
    MTS Motorcycles, near Milton Keynes.
    They are "old school"

    Regards

    Chris Lewis

    Thanks for the lead Chris.



    Quote Originally Posted by 23JDCA 808 View Post
    Stainless spokes can be made to look like any other metal that you prefer. Lots of info here or in the Internet about that. Bill in Oregon
    Thanks Bill, I will look into it.

  2. #22
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    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    Small update today, I have some car issues so Saturday was spent sorting those out but I did get some time on Sunday on the HD.

    The footboards that belong to the bike are a bit worse for wear



    So i cleaned up the 2 spares that came with the bike. One of them has had a horrible repair at some time in the past so I removed the bolts and I putit on the "to be repaired" pile.






    I also need to address the right hand twistgrip. I assume the advice on here is to replace it rather than repair?



    The original number/licence plate) has seen better days but I actually love it like it is. Sadly the UK law says that the plate has to be in better condition so the original plate is staying as it is and I will use the spare plate that came with the bike but I will need to paint it black and add white letters & numbers.







    When looking at the numberplates I was wondering what this bracket on the right side of the rack is for?


  3. #23
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    Default Re: 1920 "F" Project

    Another small update. When I was cleaning up the rear mudguard I noted that it has holes in it that I assume are for wires for a rear light. This being a 20F it did not have electric lights so I therefore assume that the same mudguard was used on the 20F and the 20J



    Another thing that I needed to do was finish stripping down the rear hub. I know that there is a special tool available for the nut that retains the brake drum but I dont have one. I didnt want to use a hammer and punch so I had a look through my scrap bin and made a very rough and quick tool to remove it. I did think that it might not be strong enough but even though the nut was very tight it did the job.









    Something I need to sort out is the external brake band. I think it would be sensible to make a new one, does anyone know what grade of steel would be best to use for the band? Has anyone made one and if so do you have any advice?





    John

  4. #24
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    Dec 2015
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    Blighty
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    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    So I have been pondering on what to put on the brown bits to slow down or stop them rusting.

    I have read tons of stuff on the subject and it is fair to say that the most effective product seems to be Owatrol Oil or as it is known in the USA Penetrol. Everyone says that it stops existing rust and prevents further rusting. However i did a small test piece and the finish looks like gloss varnish if you do a thick coat and satin varnish with a thin coat. I dot want it to look like it has been varnished so I decided that the only thing to do was do my own, very unscientific, test.

    I found a piece of 100 x 100mm (4 x 4) steel that has been outside for about 2 years. It is rusty although on close inspection not as rusty as I had expected but it is the best test piece I could find lieing about so I divided it into 8 roughly 120mm (5 inch) sections and coated each with a different product except 1 section which i left bare. The 8 products are:

    Owatrol Oil. Oil based rust inhibitor and paint conditioner.

    Boiled Linseed Oil. I think Owatrol Oil might be a posh version of this.

    Fluid Film. lanolin based marine product.

    Dynax Clear Film. Synthetic wax based underbody protector.

    ACF50. Rust preventer, popular with motorcyclists for winter protection

    WD40. Need I say more.

    Paste Wax. Various brands or homemade all seem similar.



    A bit like a weird version of The Usual Suspects!

    Its been at or a bit below freezing here at the moment so i left the test piece in the house for 2 days to see how they shaped up after having chance to cure.



    The sections are coated in the same order as the picture of the cans.

    My thoughts.

    Owatrol and Linseed are both very similar and give a satin varnish look. Probably great at stabilising and preventing rust but not how I want the 20F to look like

    Fluid Film. Still very wet after 2 days close to a heater. i dont think it is designed to dry out so is probably great in a marine application but would make just touching the frame messy. Has a "wet" look to it not surprisingly.

    Dynax Clear Film. Dries to an almost matt finish that looks good. Has a waxy feel that retains fingerprints when touched.

    ACF50. Another product that does not dry out. I have used this before and it works great for winter protection but dirt sticks to it so probably not what I want here in the same way Fluid Film is not what I want.

    WD40. Not too much to say that most people wont already know. It "dries" out quite well and gives an OK appearance. Not sure how often it would need applying, suspect after any occasion he bike gets wet.

    Paste Wax. Goes on easily and gives a dry almost matt appearance. Visually my favourite but, like WD40, I am not sure how long lasting it would be. Thanks goes to 26harleyj for suggesting this option.

    I will probably put the test piece outside for a few weeks and report back on how each section looks.

    In the meantime I need to decide what to use on my rusty metal. I am almost sure it will be wax. I have read somewhere that beeswax is slightly acidic which is why museums stopped using it on metal items and switched to microcrystaline wax also known as Renaissance Wax. I am not sure if Renaissance Wax will be better than standard paste wax in my application?

    I might use paste wax on visible areas and something else on less visible ones such as the inside of mudguards and the like.

    John

  5. #25
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    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    Hello folks.

    I have not posted for a couple of weeks because I have been doing non bike related activities however I managed a couple of hours today.

    Some new parts arrived in January



    So I removed the old cups from the headstock which marked a turning point.



    From now on it is mostly re-assembly rather than dismantling.

    As I expected I had to carefully use a die grinder to get the bottom cone off, you can see it here on the bottom right.




    New and old compared.



    The cups are very similar



    The bottom cone is thinner than the old one



    And it also has a slightly smaller diameter



    The new cups were hard to even get started let alone fully install. They measured about 10 thou bigger in diameter where they fit in the headstock than the old ones so I took some of the plating off to get them nearer to where they needed to be. Then used the press to install them.




  6. #26
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    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    When I started putting the forks back on the frame I realised that the new top cone differs from the old one. The old one has a peg so that it gets locked by the washer that fits above it.





    Can anyone tell me what you guys do with these replacement bearings. I could use a tungsten drill and drill hole and Loctite a dowel in it to replicate the old cone.

    Or I could leave it as it is and rely the lock nut.

    What do you folks do?

  7. #27
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    Sep 2007
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    Default

    Just drill a hole a thousandth under and press a dowel pin in and be done with it. Lonnie has never been great about covering all the bases. Bob L

  8. #28
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    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Robert Luland View Post
    Just drill a hole a thousandth under and press a dowel pin in and be done with it. Lonnie has never been great about covering all the bases. Bob L
    Thanks Bob, its done now so I can get on with working out how the forks fit together. See below.

    John

  9. #29
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    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    Tinkering with the bike this morning I am trying to figure out both how the forks go together and if I have all of the parts.

    I have a question, it is not critical but I would like to get it correct. Which side does the left hand thread go when fitting the fork spring plungers and coupling stud? At the moment I have the right hand thread on the right side.



    Thanks

    John

  10. #30
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    Default Re: 1920 Harley Model F

    I have another couple of questions about the forks.

    I have 2 long springs and 2 short springs plus 2 rods that look like long nails and a pair of caps.

    I assume that the long springs go in the forks first. Then the forks slide onto the fork spring plungers and then the short springs go above the spring plungers then the rods and finally the caps are screwed on.

    I assume that the long part of the fork spring plunger faces down towards the long spring?

    Now, assuming I have the above bits correct. How do you safely compress the springs to get the caps on?

    I have tried a ratchet strap but I am not going to get anywhere near. The load that I need to apply to the springs seems very high. I assume that there is a technique for doing this, can anyone provide any guidance?





    Thanks again,

    John.

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