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Thread: 1920 Harley Model F

  1. #241
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    Jan 2003
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    England
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    Dear John, your hand oil pump cap is 3583-15 and available from Colony for a few dollars. Good idea to keep at least one in the tool box.

  2. #242
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    Dec 2015
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    Blighty
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    Thanks for the tip Steve, I have made two that seem to work but I might get one from Colony as well so I can see how they are supposed to look.

    John

  3. #243
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    Dec 2015
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    I had some time off from other stuff today so decided to have a tidy up in the shop and then if time permitted have a look at the 20F. Before I did anything I thought I would give it a couple of kicks even though I know it is probably a waste of time.

    On the second kick the step starter didn't return and closer inspection revealed a broken spring. Not a big problem to fix and given that I don't really have too much time to tinker with bikes at the moment then not a big issue at all. In fact I am happier it broke now than at a more inconvenient time.

    I have ordered a spring, $22 for the spring and 26 for shipping. Its no wonder I have some new repop parts on the shelf that I haven't returned to the vendor! It is usually 2 or 3 weeks before they arrive so I will have to see how busy I am at the time (I am hoping very busy as in the grand scheme that would be good. See earlier posts for why)

    The new spring seems to be blued or parkerized but this old one had been nickel plated. I am certain it was plated when the PO had it refurbed in 1989. It is an old spring at least 80 years old and possibly the original one in which case it would be coming up to 100 years old. I do also wonder if hydrogen embrittlement from 1989 played a part though.






    John

  4. #244
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
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    Sarasota, Florida
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    You got me wondering about hydrogen embrittlement, John, and I found this informative overview. It sounds like plating that spring could have damaged it. The article offered a few suggestions for minimizing the hydrogen problem. Definitely something to keep in mind for plated parts that are subjected to stressful applications.

    https://www.imetllc.com/training-art...tlement-steel/
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  5. #245
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    I was also going to mention that you can form another anchor loop in that spring and get a bit more life out of it. If you have time to kill waiting for the new spring; it could be worth a shot.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  6. #246
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    Blighty
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    Thanks for the link Eric, I hadn't seen that site before.

    I have read a bit about hydrogen embrittlement previously and springs seem to be something that are very prone to breaking after plating unless they are done right. The hydrogen has to be "cooked" out of the part by placing it in an oven immediately after plating for quite a long time. The time is dependent on certain variables such as the area plated and thickness of plating but it is usually several days in the oven rather than just an hour or two.

    Unless you are doing the plating yourself then you need to be able to trust the plater to do it properly.

    I agree with you that the nickel plate is a likely culprit for the break.

    John

    P.S. I just saw your post script. Thanks for the suggestion, I didnt think of that and I may well give it a shot.
    Last edited by TechNoir; 08-03-2019 at 02:04 PM.

  7. #247
    Join Date
    Dec 2001
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    Eric, When we used to chrome our springers (chopper days) and their springs and other high stress parts the chromer would always put them in the oven. Some guys even did their frames the same way.
    DrSprocket

  8. #248
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    Jan 2003
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    England
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    Dear John, going into judging mode, the kicker pedal rubbers were tapered until about 1934.

  9. #249
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    Quote Originally Posted by Steve Slocombe View Post
    Dear John, going into judging mode, the kicker pedal rubbers were tapered until about 1934.
    Thanks for the info on small details which I appreciate. Its the small things like that that help you when someone claims something to be original and also to date anonymous parts at an autojumble.

    The rubbers were already fitted when I got the bike so they can stay for now. Once it is running OK I can then turn my attention to the small stuff,

    Thanks again.

    John

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