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Thread: Changing Tires

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    200

    Default Changing Tires

    I recently purchased a few tires and tubes to get some of my motorcycles rolling. This would include a Harley JD and VL. I have 2 tire irons. I am having a heck of a time trying to put the tires and tubes on the rims. I checked you tube for a few videos on doing this correctly but not seeing one that's really applicable. Anyone have a video recommendation, tools or "tricks" of the trade they can share with me ?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Location
    Maryland
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    278

    Default

    I'm fortunate enough to be able to throw them in the spray booth on the bake cycle. A bit of heat goes a long way. My clinchers rolled on by hand with a little soap. Kinda scary when you think they could roll off just as easy! Dale

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,185

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    As Dale said, the clinchers should go on by hand, without using tools. Here in Florida, it doesn't take the sun very long to make rubber pliable. Also, put some air in the tubes to minimize pinching them when you're working the tire on the rim. A clincher tire relies on air pressure to keep it on the rim, so always check your tire pressure before going for a ride.

    Your VL tires have a safety bead so they could be harder to put on the rim and you will probably need your tire irons. I have a piece of leather that I use to protect the painted rim from the tire tools. I have also heard that a good motorcycle shop can put tires on without hurting painted rims. If you have such a shop in your area, it would probably be worth the money to let them do it.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Aug 2004
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    Beautiful Northern New Mexico
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    Several things to keep in mind with drop centers (VL). Slightly inflate the tube, so it has a bit of shape but does not inflate the tire. Use plenty of tire lube, Murphy's oil soap works well, dish washing liquid too. Insert one edge of the tire into the lowest point of the bead. You should be able to almost (all the way with practice) roll the edge over the rim. Insert the tube int the half mounted tire and install the valve stem in the hole but don't pull it down all the way ( you can use tube talc if you like). Install the second edge in the deepest part of the drop OPPOSITE the valve stem. Keep the opposite in mind, it is important. Then with the tire generously lubed start working it into place keeping the edge pushed up into the deep part (be sure the tube is clear and inflated enough to keep its shape but NOT interfere with the tire). Tire irons are usually only needed for the last few inches at the stem position, and rim protectors can be almost anything. Like cardboard from a cereal box. If you are using lots of force you are doing it wrong. Double check that the tire is in the rim drop. Once the tire is in place make sure the tube nipple is correctly aligned , and inflate the tire with the without the tube core installed. After the tire seats remove the chuck and let the air back out. Install the core and re-inflate. This allows the tube to move around and not be stressed. When I was working in shops against flat rate I could change tires with just lube and my hands on smaller tires, and spoons on bigger ones in very short time. My tire spoons are truck type though, not skimpy bike ones.It paid well...
    Spoons in the foreground.

    Robbie Knight Amca #2736

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United States
    Posts
    466

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    When I put the tires onto my VL rims, I would soap up the bead slightly, and then "slam" the rim into the one side of the tire. Then, I would hit the bead with a rubber mallet. Then, put in my tube, and push down on the tire to get as much of the tire onto the rim as possible. Then... finish the install by using the rubber mallet.
    Jim

    AMCA #6520

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,351

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    Beware Folks,

    Some dishwashing detergents are quite corrosive.

    I keep my tire machine a secret.

    ....Cotten
    Attached Images Attached Images
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    4,185

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    I think you're right Tom. I have a friend that used JOY on an all white clincher years ago, and he believes that caused the surface to craze. Like Robbie suggested; look for Murphy's tire soap.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,351

    Default

    Eric!

    I got my Murphy's Oil Soap from my local dumpster.
    Haven't used it yet, but its a lifetime supply, because the tire machine is a secret.
    (And nobody knows how to use it but me.)

    ....Cotten
    PS: I regret and apologize for ever suggesting dish detergent for bubble-testing manifolds, without stressing a rinse.
    Last edited by T. Cotten; 11-15-2015 at 05:13 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
    Location
    United States
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    Default

    I NEVER knew that about using dish detergents.... Thanks for that info!!!
    Jim

    AMCA #6520

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
    Posts
    200

    Default

    Guys:
    thanks for all the help. Lots of good ideas. The heat and the soapy water were a big help. also, on the VL rims making sure the side opposite of the side of the tire you are trying to get on the rim is all the way down touching the innermost part of the rim which allowed slack on the other side - make sense ?.
    thanks again,
    Dan

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