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Thread: Workshop happenings

  1. #11
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    Too much time on your hands, Steve!

    Most of cut to the chase with a welder and a 4" grinder (attached).

    Please tell me you are not going to attempt to straighten rods assembled.

    ....Cotten
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    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  2. #12
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    Upper Yarra Valley, Victoria. Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    Too much time on your hands, Steve!

    Most of cut to the chase with a welder and a 4" grinder (attached).

    Please tell me you are not going to attempt to straighten rods assembled.

    ....Cotten
    Hi Cotton.
    Nice to see you contributing.
    Yes is the answer to first accusation.
    I've got many tools like yours. Thanks for contributing your style of tool.
    For your last query... already done the job. See previous thread and description.
    Angle iron sleeves are snugged up tight against the rod and help to alleviate stress on the flywheel.
    001" on the end of the pinion is acceptable.

    Any chance you can use your vast knowledge on DC carburetors and have a look at that thread xlr under Sportster. I am hoping you can confirm needle and seat question.

    Regards Steve
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

  3. #13
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    Aug 2009
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    rural eastern South Dakota
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    Too much time on your hands, Steve!

    Most of cut to the chase with a welder and a 4" grinder (attached).

    Please tell me you are not going to attempt to straighten rods assembled.

    ....Cotten
    my first jig looked like Cotten's, but eventually I salvaged some 1 1/4" key stock, cut 2 pcs about 4 1/2" long and drilled them to base stud spacing. This makes a good deck for the wrist pin check, and is reliable also for checking the rod's left-to-right throughout the stroke.
    I usually use 2 tweak bars to keep the stress off the thrust washers, but the shop that does my top ends employs a harley-guy who does very good work on a rod alignment tool. It's important that the guy gives a dam. Last engine needed no tweaking at all.

  4. #14
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    Sep 2001
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    Palmerston North, New Zealand
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    Here's a photo of my two HD factory ones.
    The smaller one is for the 1926 on singles and the other is the big twin one.
    Somewhere I've got the instruction sheet for them but I can't lay my hands on it right now but I'll keep looking
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    Peter Thomson, a.k.a. Tommo
    A.M.C.A. # 2777
    Palmerston North, New Zealand.

  5. #15
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    I'll admit Folks,

    I've tweaked rods assembled and got away with it,
    But after observing the behavior of the races of the female rod while straightening and gauging bend and twist on the bench (attached), I'm afraid it carries too much risk to advocate.

    And please remember that aligning by the decks (attached) can add significant error from the original axis, as I found while replacing a wristpin bushing on previously blue-printed rods.
    (That's what my tool was for...)
    It becomes a question of: Do you want the piston square to the decks, or to the rods, if they are not square to each other?

    The service manual suggestions of the past were 'field' operations for utilitarian machines, whereas the machines are now a great deal more precious. One must weigh what is at risk, against the benefits of a shortcut.

    My opinion only,

    ....Cotten
    PS: Steve!
    DCs have never needed me much, so I haven't studied them. (Plus, I didn't want to get into that yellow anodizing or whatever.) But I have photos of more un-identified valves if you want me to add to the confusion.
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    Last edited by T. Cotten; 11-06-2015 at 11:48 AM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  6. #16
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    Sep 2005
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    Sarasota, Florida
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    Good points on rod accuracy Tom. Your last picture says it all.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  7. #17
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    Aug 2009
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    rural eastern South Dakota
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    Cotten, my key stocks are used like your beams are, but to be sure, let's confirm that we are checking that clearance with the crankshaft at both 4:30 (of the clock) and 7:30 (approximations). This helps indicate a twist vs a bend. If the right hand side is lower than left at 4:30 but higher at 7:30 we have a twist. If right hand side is comparable at both positions we have a bend. A consistent zero-clearance on both sides of the rod shows straightness.

  8. #18
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    Tom, I would like to read your comments on the ill effects you have experienced, such as on the spindly Indian forked rod.
    I have a bar that you'd throw in the scrap pile, a wrist pin with two handles welded to it. I don't use it much anymore, but got a lot of miles out of its results.

  9. #19
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    Filibuster!

    The problem is obvious in that the races "splay" askew when the rod is forced. I guess the proper words to describe it elude me, but the point is that you can quickly get a bind.
    Even stout H-D rods will 'move', even if you do not notice for a while.

    I have my Indian female rod bench fixture to photograph, but health issues are in my way again....

    Measuring from ancient and variable decks can only give us clues.
    Assuming the decks happen to be perfectly square (more likely for a milwaukee machine than Springfield's, I suspect..), bend is obvious when there is a difference from left to right.
    Twist would certainly increase the difference, but if it happens that there is no bend, shouldn't the pin still come down square to the deck at any degree of rotation, or 'time o'clock'?

    You didn't really tweak directly upon the wristpin bushing, did you?
    My bar punishes the beam only (attached). But I preferred other torture devices.

    ...Cotten
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    Last edited by T. Cotten; 11-06-2015 at 03:32 PM.
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  10. #20
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    Apr 2008
    Location
    Upper Yarra Valley, Victoria. Australia
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    Quote Originally Posted by Tommo View Post
    Here's a photo of my two HD factory ones.
    The smaller one is for the 1926 on singles and the other is the big twin one.
    Somewhere I've got the instruction sheet for them but I can't lay my hands on it right now but I'll keep looking
    Hi Thommo. Neat set of tools. Are you suggesting theres a picture of the Big Twin plate in the service manual? I thought tI was making a tool that didn't exist... more a melded design from two different HD tools, but maybe I've been driven by subliminal prompting.
    I'll have to re read my Knuck and Pan service manuals.
    Wife did suggest to take a book or two. Maybe a couple of service manuals stuffed into the bottom of my bag for some light reading.
    Steve Little
    Upper Yarra Valley. Victoria.
    Australia.
    AMCA member 1950

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