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Thread: Workshop happenings

  1. #21
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    Filibuster!

    The problem is obvious in that the races "splay" askew when the rod is forced. I guess the proper words to describe it elude me, but the point is that you can quickly get a bind.
    Even stout H-D rods will 'move', even if you do not notice for a while.

    Okay on that, Tom, but I'm a bit suspicious. But the later Chiefs appear heavy enough in the low end to assure that any "give" would be in the beam.



    I have my Indian female rod bench fixture to photograph, but health issues are in my way again....

    Measuring from ancient and variable decks can only give us clues.
    Assuming the decks happen to be perfectly square (more likely for a milwaukee machine than Springfield's, I suspect..), bend is obvious when there is a difference from left to right.
    Twist would certainly increase the difference, but if it happens that there is no bend, shouldn't the pin still come down square to the deck at any degree of rotation, or 'time o'clock'?

    It's checking in both positions, of course, that confirms twist vs bend. Twist a straight rod, then, in your mind. One end of the wrist pin hits the deck (key stock blocks for me) at 4:30, the other end of the wrist pin hits the deck at 7:30. .... and I like to get the "rock" out of the decks before we get to this stage. I do like Steve's plate for that.

    You didn't really tweak directly upon the wristpin bushing, did you?
    My bar punishes the beam only (attached). But I preferred other torture devices.

    ...Cotten
    Yeah, I tortured the wrist pin bushing, Tom, but that was a long time ago. .. Say, if the rod was bent, what made it that way? birth? or a seized piston? or what? Did the piston exert force through the wrist pin and then the bushing? So what are we now trying to protect?

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2001
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    Palmerston North, New Zealand
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    Here's how HD told you to align rods using their surface plate and Cotton it's not how I would do it or advise anyone else to do it.
    Attached Images Attached Images
    Peter Thomson, a.k.a. Tommo
    A.M.C.A. # 2777
    Palmerston North, New Zealand.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
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    Central Illinois, USA
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    Sorry for a late reply Filibuster...

    It was a blue-printed "late" Chief rod that would no longer accept the crankpin and rollers after a 'conventional' tweaking.
    You can't straighten a rod for bend or twist until races and bushing are fitted, as those operations add error, and the massage made things move.

    So I conjured an expandable collet to hold the female rod in a press to keep the races firm while punished (attached).

    Bend and twist are a lot more manageable than an offset, which is even more difficult to detect while assembled.

    ....Cotten
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    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  4. #24
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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    Sorry for a late reply Filibuster...

    It was a blue-printed "late" Chief rod that would no longer accept the crankpin and rollers after a 'conventional' tweaking.
    You can't straighten a rod for bend or twist until races and bushing are fitted, as those operations add error, and the massage made things move.

    So I conjured an expandable collet to hold the female rod in a press to keep the races firm while punished (attached).

    Bend and twist are a lot more manageable than an offset, which is even more difficult to detect while assembled.

    ....Cotten
    My chemistry prof used to say, ".. if you can appreciate that..", as in "recognize the full worth of.."
    So I appreciate your contribution. Dam, there's just no end to the tooling required for perfection.
    Is "perfect" the enemy of "good"? I heard that once, from a doctor.
    The hub of an alignment tool appears to be the shape of the arbor of a sunnen hone stone rig. Can't tweak on that.
    I once cut a shaft to as close a fit as I could manage, this prior to lapping.
    Honestly, how diligent are our builders who do work for others? Do they really possess more sophisticated tools than clubs and rock bars?

  5. #25
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    Jun 2001
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    Quote Originally Posted by fillibuster View Post
    ...Honestly, how diligent are our builders who do work for others? Do they really possess more sophisticated tools than clubs and rock bars?
    From my experience, Filibuster,..

    The truly diligent can't make flat-rate.

    If I don't make a new tool every day, my day is wasted.
    But there is certainly a place for clubs on my wall. Several, actually.
    Not sure about "rock bars" though. I have a pre-Columbian meteoric iron celt, if that counts.

    ....Cotten
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    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

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