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Thread: 1926 JD Build

  1. #21

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    Eric, Yes I agree, the paint is a bit thick. The frame had some pitting and I was told that the best way to fill the pits would be with a high build primer instead of a plastic filler. I think the fear was since the plastic filler would be so small there would be a risk for it to come loose over time. With the paint being a single stage it had to be applied fairly wet to achieve the gloss. I'm sure this all lead to the thick look.

    You mentioned the paint should be removed from the transmission mounting surface. Would you remove it from just the transmission or both the frame and transmission? Wouldn't happen to have a picture would ya? I have already removed the paint from the motor mounts. Is this for grounding, or just the fear that the paint will come loose and cause the motor to also become loose.

    Mike

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,475

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    Mike, you will want to remove the paint from the trans where it contacts the frame. This is so the transmission will move easily when you have to adjust the primary chain. On the engine mounts; I guess that is for a good ground. I had a problem with that on an Indian which kept blowing fuses, and light bulbs.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  3. #23

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    Made a little more progress on the bike. I have been picking away at some smaller stuff over the past few months when I get some free time. One big accomplishment was finding what I believe to be an original headlight for the bike. I am very close to being able to lace up the wheels and mount the tires. For many different reasons gathering all the parts I needed for the wheels has been very difficult, but I have everything I need now. it will be great to see the bike as a roller.
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  4. #24

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    Looks like the correct 1926-1928 headlight bucket to me.
    Good find.
    Mark

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Seaford, NY
    Posts
    373

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    I believe that a '26 Jd headlight is one year only having the wiring connector on the back. The 1927-28 had a hole on back that the wires passed through. Correct me if I'm wrong. I can post a picture of a '26 headlight if need be.

  6. #26

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    You are correct. The bucket pictured is 1927-28
    Mark

  7. #27

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    That's what I was thinking regarding the headlight as well. However I believe I am still going to run the light. I have looked and looked for a real JD headlight for about 2 years now and this is the only one I have found for sale and have been able to afford. I figure down the road if I find a correct 26' light I can always trade or sell this one.

    I have been picking away at the bike slowly. I finally gathered all the parts I needed to assemble the wheels. Boxed everything up and sent it out to Bucanan's for them to assemble. I expect to get the wheels back in a few weeks or so.

    I do have one question for the masses. I have started to look at my fuel tanks and what it will take to repair them. I am working with the left side tank first. Currently I have unsoldered the back half of the tank and quickly glass beaded the surface. There are a number of pin holes and the metal seems very thin in areas. I have a copy of an write up that was posted in the AMCA magazine years ago that talks about how to solder up your tanks. In this it talks about using some brass mesh to repair any pin holes. My question is, is this still the best way to do this? I believe the write up was done in the 1990's and I know some chemical technologies have come a long way since then. Is there some type of epoxy out there that could be applied from the inside of the tank to seal up the holes and add some structure to the tank?
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  8. #28
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Location
    Seaford, NY
    Posts
    373

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    pm sent from harleytoprock

  9. #29

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    Mike,
    I too have a 26 JD. First buying it I thought it was complete. As I got more into it I realized everything had been changed. Parts were used off of cars and whatever else to keep it going. I am going to settle for a rider rather than a restoration. I rode it his summer but now have the motor out and am going to do the top end. It also has a later model front end with a brake. Not a bad thing if taken out on the highway. I believe the headlight for the 26 is one year only and Dan is an expert on them. Good luck!

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Dec 2015
    Location
    Blighty
    Posts
    170

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    Quote Originally Posted by MassHarley View Post
    I do have one question for the masses. I have started to look at my fuel tanks and what it will take to repair them. I am working with the left side tank first. Currently I have unsoldered the back half of the tank and quickly glass beaded the surface. There are a number of pin holes and the metal seems very thin in areas. I have a copy of an write up that was posted in the AMCA magazine years ago that talks about how to solder up your tanks. In this it talks about using some brass mesh to repair any pin holes. My question is, is this still the best way to do this? I believe the write up was done in the 1990's and I know some chemical technologies have come a long way since then. Is there some type of epoxy out there that could be applied from the inside of the tank to seal up the holes and add some structure to the tank?
    I had similar problems with my tanks for my 20J. See my post #91 here for what I did.

    http://www.antiquemotorcycle.org/bbo...Model-F/page10


    John.

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