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Thread: 1926 JD Build

  1. #11

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    It been awhile since I had a chance to post more here, so I figured I would try to update everyone. As of right now the motor is complete, Dan got the complete motor back to me in the summer of 2014. I also have the transmission complete; Rich Correia helped me with this. He bored the case and replaced all the bearings with more modern seal bearings. Even added a O-ring on the gear shafts to prevent leakage. Once I had a good amount of parts complete I decided I would begin painting a few parts. To this point I have everything painted except for the gas tanks and fenders. I have been slowly picking away at assembling some of the smaller components like the hubs, horn, and dash. I even made myself a bench top spray booth to paint the small stuff.
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  2. #12

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    I have been slowly piecing together the carburetor for the bike. The carb that came with the bike when I bought it was a DLX 66. I know this isn't the correct carb for the year but for now I believe it will work. I had classic metal restorations, in Shaftsbury, VT do the nickle plating and it came out great! I think about the only thing I am missing now is a high speed adjustment knob.

    The rear hub is all assembled and ready to be laced up. My original brake drum was completely collapsed so I had to find something different. I ending up getting a very nice, one piece drum from the good old motorcycle company. They call it the super-drum if I remember correctly. The overall beefyness of the hub is far superior to the original and should never collapse as the brake is applied.

    I am still looking for some more parts to finish off the bike so if anyone had some JD stuff they would like to get rid of please let me know.
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  3. #13
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    480

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    Mike, beautiful work ! Look forward to seeing your progress ! Very nice !

    Since August 2013, i've been piecing together a 27 JD, and am getting closer to the point where i can begin fitting things together for the initial build. i started a build thread a while back and look forward to posting my progress maybe as early as this winter.

    did you do your own Parkerizing ? i've bought the material and equipment; plan to do mine when the time comes.

    there's alot of great guys who are tremendous help making parts and providing services for these machines. i am appreciative to them all.

    Again, very beautiful job and the very best.

  4. #14

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    Steve, I look forward to seeing your progress!

    Yes, I did the parkerizing myself. Actually Dan Margolien showed me how to do it the first time. I found and old electric stove at a tag sale along with some stainless pans. Its really a simple process, I can understand why Harley used it.

    Dan had showed me a trick one time too with parkerizing. You can use black wood stove polish to enhance the darkness of the parts or even touch up an area that may be slightly less dark. It works really well and seems to hold up nicely.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,474

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    MassHarley, I love to see a restoration project in process. Looks like you're doing a first class job, so please keep posting.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  6. #16
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    480

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    i bought one of Bob L's standard brake hubs; very nice part. What finish do you plan to give your hub ? and, backing plate the brake bands attach to ?

  7. #17

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    Steve, My plan was to glass bead everything except for the actual braking surface then Parkerize it. The parkerizing doesn't seem to do much on a very smooth surface. The backing plate will also be parkerized. The brake bands themselves i'm not too sure. I would imagine from the factory they were parkerized before the brake lining was installed. The set I have the brake lining is nicely riveted on and I don't plan to remove it. I might just glass bead and use the wood stove polish. The polish should handle the heat produced from braking as well.

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2013
    Posts
    480

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    Thanks ! i pretty much have a handle on finishes for most of the parts, except for drum, backing plate (and bands!) i've not found or been told that finish. based on all the pictures of orig.paint JD's i've been collecting, jd yahoo grp info and shared experience from others, seems those finishes for parts were still for some reason an unknown... my instinct was to Parkerize.... not familiar with stove black, but maybe sounds like i need to be... i too have been into some Japanese bikes, mostly over the past 15 years small displacement 60's Yamaha 2 cycles and CB750 sandcast. i'm 36 inverted years old.... 63 ! really great to see "youth" doing the fine work you are doing and with your Dad to boot ! don't mean to derail your thread..... !

  9. #19

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    I have a quick question for all the guys that have restored bikes in the past. I am running into an issue when it comes to assembling two parts that have a metal to metal fit. As an example, the rear axle as it passes through the frame. To adjust the chain tension the axle needs to slide here. So do I leave this area covered in paint or scrape all the paint off. If you scrap all the paint off then how to you finish that small section of exposed metal, or do you not worry about it? There are other areas of the bike this comes into play as well.

    Thanks, Mike
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  10. #20
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
    Posts
    3,474

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    Mike, in cases like that you have to say; "What would Harley-Davidson have done". H-D was a money making concern so they would have painted everything, and if some paint got rubbed off, so be it. On a frame, the only places they would have masked (or scraped) would be, the bottom motor mount lugs, and transmission mounting surface. This is just an observation, and not a criticism but your paint appears to be rather thick compared to H-D factory applications. Their paint was applied very thin, and possibly, with no primer in the JD era. I think they got away with this because their paint had a very high pigment content, and they baked it on. H-D factory paint jobs were of very high quality and hard to replicate with today's modern paints.
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

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