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Thread: Welding cases

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    8

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    The first two pictures are very impressive. Nice neat, clean welds. On the third picture if you notice on the ends of some of the welds there are little pin holes and on the sides of some of the welds. I am assuming this is a flywheel cover and there is no oil behind it. The spots I am referring to , that is the contamination that I was referring to in my post. I am not saying the welding is bad, I am just posting so if you did have a case with a weld with the little spots going over them makes them worse. So what I used to do is take an air blower, put soap and water on the weld and blow it from the back side. If any of them spots leaked where there was oil I would take a sharp punch and peen the weld bead next to it into the hole, pressure check it again. Never had one come back with a leak.

  2. #22

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    Thanks Gsotti, your post has made me think that the laser welding was done on my cases to mend the shrinkage cracks left by the tig welding. So the laser welding would never be a solution to the bearing bridge or the engine mount, because it is not 'Man enough'. It's a shame my engineer didn't explain this to me.
    I for one, have learned such allot from all of your replies about these cases and the welding of them. And that's the great thing about this forum !
    Ivor.

  3. #23
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    Austria
    Posts
    204

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    Thanks for your replies tator and Ivor.

    The good thing with the laser is, that after cleaning the weld I can check where there is small spots left that need attention. The welding does not burn the holes bigger and can just be put where the hole was after the spot is cleaned down to the clean basic material. I am lucky to have a friendly and skilled laser welder just a few miles away from me. That helps too of course. And it is definately right that it is not the best solution for all welds, but for some repairs it is very useable and preserves the original substance as good as possible.

  4. #24
    Join Date
    Jan 2006
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    285

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    Originally, when I bought 1929 402 resto project. I talked with the previous owner decades ago who is longer with us,he told me he bought the Four in 1942 and those cases were welded then. I could not clean up the welds to look good so that is why I had them realigned and welded with a more modern process. People now are offering the service but I think you need to boil the oil out in a chemical name I don't remember. My point is, they obviously were successful in those day leak wise and strong but not beauty wise like us resto nuts want.. ..Joe
    Joe AMCA# 3435

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Jul 2018
    Posts
    8

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    Something I would like to touch on is when welding these cases you are welding something that was never intended to be welded. If you are welding normal aluminum like 5052 that is meant to be welded there is welding rod for that purpose. Most welding stores only carry about three or four different kinds of welding rod or heliarc wire. I have had my best luck with a EA5356 rod/wire in 1/8 inch size. It seems to be wet enough to flow nice, it is strong and it machines very well. One time I sent some GM axel castings out to be tested to see what they were made of. They came back with a whole list of stuff that you knew was going to be trouble to weld. Mostly stuff that was outside stuck to the pores that was used as a releasing agent to remove the molds. That was not very much help. So when welding these cases it is not what you do right or wrong, it is how you save it in the end. So you clean and you clean some more, then pre-heat where you are going to weld and when you start welding and start to see little black spots floating in your weld it is time to stop and clean your rod any contamination on the tungsten, then when you finish welding and you have pin holes you can use a small clean drill bit, make sure there is no oil on it, drill them out, then weld them again. When you get done welding, cover the part up with a welding blanket so it cools slow. While it is cooling, listen to see if it makes a "tink" sound, if you hear that sound, you will have a crack in your weld that you will have to repair. When you are cleaning these castings do not use carb cleaner, it has oil in it, or any other oil base product. Do not use brake cleaner, it is Very toxic when you weld. Acetone is very good to clean your welding rods to be free of contaminates. When I am welding these casing I use AC current with high frequency and I use a pure green tungsten with a ball on the end.

  6. #26
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Near Bristol UK
    Posts
    61

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    Hi all,

    My cases were weld by a guy who works for Rolls Royce aero engines, it was really a superficial repairs as he said the original weld was probably OK but looked messy. I think some time in the past a gearbox fault damaged the bearing pedestal. Now the motors back together, still waiting on the carburetor a 1 year only Marvel Schebler for 1936, a "specialist" has had it for 3 years!!!! Any one out there is able to help me on parts? I need a float needle valve assy. I've resigned to doing it my self now.

    Reading the tales of woe, I'm very lucky with my cases which are matching numbers and perfect in every other respect.
    Regards

    Tim



    '36 four. '44 Chief & sidecar. '28 Scout. '67 XLCH. '70 BSA. and a Guzzi...............

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