Page 1 of 4 123 ... LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 38

Thread: Cyclone Stolen !

  1. #1

    Default Cyclone Stolen !

    i've heard thru the grapevine that a cyclone racer was stolen from a private collector out in L.A. I dont have all the details yet ,but it appears that it wasn't random. this is going to be a hard bike to hide, so keep your ears open.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    High in the B.C. Rockies....
    Posts
    5,308

    Default

    What is up with these bike thieves???? A Cyclone??? How is the thief going to unload that one on the sly??? Could there really be an antique buff waiting in the wings to take ownership? Man, this kind of news turns my stomach. I hope the bike is found and returned.
    Cory Othen
    Membership#10953

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lamoille County, Vermont
    Posts
    973

    Default

    Based on the Vegas auctions... the parts are worth 5X what the bike is worth.

    That or it goes into a private collection (possibly overseas) never to be seen again.

    Another possibility is that 3 - 4 "new" Cyclones suddenly appear as barn finds or restorations with enough original parts on them to pass off as the real deal.

    There have been more than a few instances of an original car going into a shop... and 2 - 3 "originals" coming out the other end. Each with 1/3rd of original parts -- ebough to pass as original. And cars that were thought to be crashed, junked, burned or otherwise lost "Miraculously" have been found in barns and restored. Amazing coincidence... The dollars are so big on some of the cars (Duesenbergs, Bugattis, Isottas, etc. etc. etc.) that the incentive is out there.

    Cheers,

    Sirhr

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Feb 2002
    Location
    Mitford Community, South Carolina
    Posts
    545

    Default

    A Cyclone is such a rare and distinctive motorcycle, it would be impossible to hide or disguise. Even the parts popping up would raise eyebrows. However, there are a number of rare works of art by the masters that have disappeared, especially during WWII, never to be seen again. The thought is that many are in private collections admired only by the owner. Occasionally, one will pop back up though it is also thought that some will change hands even when it is known they are stolen.
    Lonnie Campbell #9
    South Cackalackey, U.S. of A.

    Come see us at the Fifth Annual AMCA Southern National Meet - May 16 - 18, 2014 at Denton FarmPark, Denton, N.C. Our theme this year is "Race Bikes".

    Visit the website for vendor and visitor information at www.amcasouthernnationalmeet.com

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    North Hills, CA and Pine Grove, CA
    Posts
    4,567

    Default

    I know one Cyclone owner here in LA. I hope it wasn't his. His was the typical racer. A Cyclone engine in an Harley frame with a Merkel fork. Mike Parti had restored it for him back in the '80's.
    Be sure to visit;
    http://www.vintageamericanmotorcycles.com/main.php
    Be sure to register at the site so you can see large images.
    Also be sure to visit http://www.caimag.com/forum/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    High in the B.C. Rockies....
    Posts
    5,308

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by sirhrmechanic View Post
    Based on the Vegas auctions... the parts are worth 5X what the bike is worth.

    That or it goes into a private collection (possibly overseas) never to be seen again.

    Another possibility is that 3 - 4 "new" Cyclones suddenly appear as barn finds or restorations with enough original parts on them to pass off as the real deal.

    There have been more than a few instances of an original car going into a shop... and 2 - 3 "originals" coming out the other end. Each with 1/3rd of original parts -- ebough to pass as original. And cars that were thought to be crashed, junked, burned or otherwise lost "Miraculously" have been found in barns and restored. Amazing coincidence... The dollars are so big on some of the cars (Duesenbergs, Bugattis, Isottas, etc. etc. etc.) that the incentive is out there.

    Cheers,

    Sirhr

    Aside from the thought of bike thieves, the tearing down of originals to distribute parts to make 2 to 3 "new" originals in the car world is disturbing. It's sounds like some people are only in it for the money and the watering down of history is of little concern. It's been prevalent in the motorcycle world too with the presence of more board track racers now than ever. It's one thing to build a machine from parts to pay homeage to a certain era but passing it off as original is just wrong. To the people who represent their built up bikes as replicas, my hat is off to you for your honesty. With the recent thefts in California, I would imagine it's made some of the collectors with really rare machines a little nervous.
    Cory Othen
    Membership#10953

  7. #7

    Default

    i'm afraid you are correct chris. this is a very famous bike. it was on display in the guggenhiem, and has been to all the major concours in the last 5 years. it is totally different from any other cyclone out there.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lamoille County, Vermont
    Posts
    973

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by c.o. View Post
    It's sounds like some people are only in it for the money and the watering down of history is of little concern.
    The good ones... no. And don't get me wrong, there are some amazing, great restorers out there.

    Personally, I'd like to skin the people who do that sort of thing. I know who some are -- it's a small community. One of the biggest offenders is an attorney turned restorer... And a testament to the saying 'not all butchers cut meat.'

    Especially when there are big $$ to be made... the dirtbags come out and open shops. Everything from Maaco-type body work to cut-rate engines. They usually don't last in the business, but the damage they do is impossible to un-do! And when you can make a 6-figure commission brokering high-end cars, the temptation is there.

    I was present at one of the 'good' shops a few years ago when a forged Alfa was examined. It had come into the shop after an auction. Was a former 6C, probably a saloon, that had been shortened, turned into an 8C supercharged, etc. etc. etc. Welded frame, mismatch numbers all over the place. It looked great from the top. But once you started to look at the details, it was a mess.

    Auction house was one of the big ones. To their credit... they 100 percent stood behind the transaction. Turns out that the seller didn't know either. The car had been through 2 - 3 auctions and I am not sure anyone ever figured out who/when it was done. But it was likely done in the '80s... "New" owner ended up keeping the car at a greatly-reduced price. Old owner took a bath and the auction 'he' bought it from said 'too bad.'

    But had the car not been gone over by a sharp-eyed tech who knew his stuff, it would still be represented as original. At least now it's a known forgery. But it could very, very easily get 'forgotten' and re-auctioned in the future.

    If anyone has ever been a fan of BBC tv, there used to be a great series about an antique dealer who solved mysteries. I think it was called Lovejoy. One episode was about how they 'faked' the Brough Superior to make it look like the one that T.E. Lawrence had been killed on. They showed the process brilliantly, including how it was represented to a wealthy Saudi w.out ever saying it was Lawrence's actual bike. Great fun episode... but reminds one about caveat emptor.

    Laundering bikes/cars through auctions is a very common thing. Get it in a few catalogs and poof, instant provenance.

    I give our customers and those who call the shop 'looking' to buy cars the following tips: 1. You may WANT that old car right now. But you don't NEED it. Plan on spending up to a year looking. Don't buy the first car you see. 2. Keep your eyes open and your wallet shut. Research, learn, drive 'good' examples of the car you want. Attend a tour. Learn what you are getting into before you buy. 3. Hire an expert and LISTEN to them. If the pre-buy report says 'run' from this vehicle, don't use the report to chisel another few $K off the price. 4. Auctions and Hemmings are the last resort of the 'scoundrel' vehicle. It ends up in an auction so you get 'no comebacks.' Hemmings because noone else wants it. The best stuff changes hands between collectors and gentlemen on a handshake and with little or no advertising. 5. Buy the car that appeals to you cosmetically -- Because you can fix anything but ugly.

    That last one I stole from a great friend, the late Ken Karger, who had the best eye for old cars, bikes, cameras, etc.

    Cheers,

    Sirhr

    PS. I love both Hemmings and Walnecks. I can't speak for Walnecks as I've never seen anything bought through them. But I've seen some real disasters come from Hemmings... YMMV, the usual caveats apply.
    Last edited by sirhrmechanic; 02-04-2012 at 07:14 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    North Hills, CA and Pine Grove, CA
    Posts
    4,567

    Default

    I just made the call and found out it was Jeff Gilbert's. Cyclone. They took it and a rare Honda racer at gunpoint at 4AM this morning.
    Be sure to visit;
    http://www.vintageamericanmotorcycles.com/main.php
    Be sure to register at the site so you can see large images.
    Also be sure to visit http://www.caimag.com/forum/

  10. #10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •