Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 24

Thread: Cast Iron Welding

  1. #1

    Question Cast Iron Welding

    Purchased a decent square base scout cylinder. It's only fault is one of the base stud holes has the outer half broken off. Any leads to find a well qualified welder to repair the stud hole? Willing to pay for quality.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    North Hills, CA and Pine Grove, CA
    Posts
    5,422

    Default

    Dan Gesick is a certified welder and a wizzard with cast iron.
    1073 Honey Run Rd
    Chico, CA 95928
    530-343-8198
    Be sure to visit;
    http://www.vintageamericanmotorcycles.com/main.php
    Be sure to register at the site so you can see large images.
    Also be sure to visit http://www.caimag.com/forum/

  3. #3

    Default

    It should be brazed, not welded

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,081

    Lightbulb

    Quote Originally Posted by fabercycle View Post
    It should be brazed, not welded
    With all due respect,
    (for after all, I do NOT offer the service...)

    Cast iron can often (of course not always..) be flame-welded using piston rings for filler rod.

    I guess you would have to see it to believe it.

    ...Cotten
    PS: It works fantastic on Chief frames!
    Attached Images Attached Images
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  5. #5

    Default

    I'm not sayin' that another method won't work, but I've seen alot of weld failures, and harldly any braze failures.

    We got a cylinder flange ear braze repaired on our class C race bike, and it's got 3500 miles of full throttle racing without failure.

    I like to do what has been proven to work. Come to think of it, I do it for a living and nobody has ever seemed to complain of a failure..............ever.
    Last edited by fabercycle; 06-21-2010 at 07:09 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    4,081

    Default

    Tom!

    Most all true pro's that I know (who also laugh heartily at my piston ring filler of course) go straight to silicon bronze or nickel by TIG. Brass is a sin to them.

    Both are extremely hard to work with, and far more trouble in the long run.

    Cast iron on cast iron is machineable. That means a lot from a practical sense.

    Another option that has worked well for me is silver solder. But then I didn't know any better.

    Everything has its time and place.

    ....Cotten
    AMCA #776
    Dumpster Diver's Motto: Seek,... and Ye Shall Find!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    North Hills, CA and Pine Grove, CA
    Posts
    5,422

    Default

    A brass fix on a cast iron part won't get by the judges.
    Be sure to visit;
    http://www.vintageamericanmotorcycles.com/main.php
    Be sure to register at the site so you can see large images.
    Also be sure to visit http://www.caimag.com/forum/

  8. #8

    Default

    Cotton,

    Dont' condecend to me, with "most true pros" Screw you, I'm not a pro?

    You should consider that the comments you make, toward someone that others respect, may create hard feelings and hurt your buisness.....you seem to be good at that lately.

    Tom
    Last edited by fabercycle; 06-22-2010 at 08:39 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Location
    rural eastern South Dakota
    Posts
    934

    Default

    For 15 years now, I've been wanting to go to a Bud Redmond New Year's Day cast iron welding party. The method of the purists in my neighborhood will build an igloo-style oven out of fire brick, slowly bring the work up to 2000 degrees or so, then torch-weld in with cast iron rod, trying to maintain oven's effects til welding is complete, then let sweat in the oven for a while, then submerge in vermiculite, or floor-dry, and let things slow-cool there, which should be over 12 to 24 hours to get down to warm-to-touch. The concept with the heat is that even heating and slow cooling will yield the most even distribution of stress areas, and an even reaction to heat-and-cool growth for normal working.
    I have friends who have brazed in wrist-pin gouges, and claim several thousand miles of service. Heated to 450 in the oven, .......

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2002
    Location
    North Hills, CA and Pine Grove, CA
    Posts
    5,422

    Default

    Dan Gesick did a wonderful job repairing 5 Knuckleheads for me. No visible repairs when he is done. UPS goes to his door.
    Be sure to visit;
    http://www.vintageamericanmotorcycles.com/main.php
    Be sure to register at the site so you can see large images.
    Also be sure to visit http://www.caimag.com/forum/

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •