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Thread: anzani

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Sep 2005
    Location
    Sarasota, Florida
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    4,156

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    That is a gorgeous motor Rob. You could get a lot of pleasure from putting it on a shelf and looking at it, but it would be more fun to put in something to ride. What are your plans?
    Eric Smith
    AMCA #886

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    1,284

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    the carb that came with it is an amal. but almost don't look right on it . the manifold is to hinky. it's just brass pipe with a nut braezed to it .every part on the inside of the mag has anzani stamped on it. i have been told by a few people that during the war and a little after the french could not get german made bosch mags. so yes anzani made his own mags.still having a hard time id'ing the motor

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    eric my plans are to ride it. i have a few paths i can take. this motor kinda but the brakes on my cutdown project (maybe) having 2 projects gives us all the option of not coming home empty handed from swap meets with wauseon fresh on the mind i would like to ride it around the track in 2 years. plus lucy is not happy with the anzani cornacopia on the dinning room table lol.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Dec 2006
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    1,284

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    i got the motor apart today. it has a bore of 82mm and a stroke of 90mm . some time ago someone was in there. it has a borgo piston and sealed bearings this thing has been run hard

  5. #15
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    Dec 2006
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    1,284

  6. #16
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    Dec 2006
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    some more photos




  7. #17

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    In the book Murderdrome is a lot of information also photos. (about 100 pages of France) www.American-x.org

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Jan 2003
    Location
    England
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    1,312

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    Yes I can recommend that book by Thomas Bund. It covers early board and cement track racing in France, Germany, England and the USA. Page 88 shows a picture of the Italian Alessandro Anzani in 1905 on a board tracker. The next page shows a later French ad for Anzani motors, with a picture of a six cylinder radial engine and text saying he made 3 - 24 cylinder motors of 3 - 160 horsepower. A three cylinder Anzani Y-motor powered Bleriot across the English Channel in 1909, and some of his big V-Twins powered privateer racer motorcycles round Brooklands track in England in the 1920s. He seemed to be a proprietary engine manufacturer like J.A. Prestwich, but also like Glen Curtiss in the USA he started on bikes then moved on to aviation. Interesting guy, and nice motor!

  9. #19

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    Anzani was a bicycle racer like most early motorcycle racers. He first worked for Hurtu and then Alcyon and Buchet. He was one of the famous board track racers in Paris from 1902-1906. In 1906 he opened a factory in France in Courbevoie for motors. Beside Motorcycle engines he made 3 Cylinder W Motors for Motorcycles as well as for aircrafts like Bleriot and pacing engines up to 4500 cc! The engine you have in the Thread is from the twenties. I think from the english or italian factory. Anzani was a manufacturer like JAP and MAG. The book Murderdrome (500 Fotos) has many photos of Anzani and also of other famous French board track racers which came also to the U.S. like Grapperon, Contant etc. for racing. They got the experience on tracks like velodrome Buffalo (named after Buffalo Bill because the Wild West Show was there) Parc de Princes and Velodrome d`Hiver. There are photos of motorcycles you never saw.
    In France board track racing started around 1900, followed by Germany, Benelux and England. Every town had a velodrome which was also used for motorcycle racing. There were hundreds!
    In the US there were some races in concrete velodromes around 1904/5 but the real board track racing started around 1908/9. In Europe we had never the circular tracks like the US. All the wooden tracks were replaced by concrete velodromes because of the maintaining costs. Today only one outside board track in Hannover / Germany is there. Spending about $35.000 a year to maintain it. We had the chance to ride on this track. The guy who takes care of the track is 76 years old! When he will pass away, that`s it.
    see the videos on www.American-x.org
    Last edited by American X; 01-22-2014 at 02:51 PM.

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Location
    Lamoille County, Vermont
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    1,147

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    Gorgeous piece of industrial design... not just a motor, art!

    Thanks for posting. Wish I knew something about the bikes. But admiring your pictures for sure!

    Cheers,

    Sirhr

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