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Thread: Leather Maintenance & restoration

  1. #21
    Join Date
    Feb 2007
    Location
    Hummelstown, PA
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    901

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    WOW! that brought back some memories, that's what granpa used to dress our ballgloves with when we were little. I had forgoten all about that till you brought it up, thanks.
    Brian Howard AMCA#5866

  2. #22
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    High in the B.C. Rockies....
    Posts
    5,353

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    You bethca! I was hoping some of the leather guys would weigh in on it........ just curious..... Oh, by the way anybody who doesn't have a copy of that encyclopedia should get one. It's got a pile of info in it.....
    Cory Othen
    Membership#10953

  3. #23

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    CO--As a leather guy weighing in, please read my previous posts. No type of oil should be used on motorcycle seats or saddlebags!!!! It is a recipe for disaster and I will be the guy that folks send this stuff to for repair!!!!--Michael--6671

  4. #24
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Southeast WI
    Posts
    179

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    Cory, I've got a copy of Dykes . Every time I pick that thing up Im good for 2 hours of reading. It's hard to put down. Heres another question, I've got some Britt bikes also.
    A solo seat by Lycette..covered with a heavy type of oil cloth and a dual seat from the 50s
    that has a leather look, but is some type of vinyl. What to use on these type of seats?
    I won't use any silicone products..... Thanks for any help...Rod

  5. #25
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    High in the B.C. Rockies....
    Posts
    5,353

    Smile

    I read your posts Michael. I just thought I'd post on what they were doing back in the '20's. I guess things have come a long way....... I've got an ancient bicycle seat that may have seen oil in it's lifetime. Man, you could break rocks with it now!!
    Cory Othen
    Membership#10953

  6. #26

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    H-D sold a product back in the 30's & 40's called Leather Lacquer, and that is just what it was lacquer, but OH would it make your seat and bags look purdy ( for a while)!!! It sealed the leather and would eventually make it hard as a rock and crack like the bottom of a dry lake bed. Sometimes, the old ways aren't the best!!

  7. #27
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    201

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    Michael,

    Thought this question belongs in this thread rather than start another. If one were to have put neatsfoot oil on a new set of bags, only on the outside, can the damage be stopped or reversed with the application of anything else, like maybe a solvent or perhap a good soap and detergent cleaning followed up by treatment with Lexol or glycerine?

    I'm asking because I have always had neatsfoot oil around for making black powder lubes and since the old school info has always been to use neatsfoot oil on leather, there is a chance that I have used this stuff on a set of bags in the past, or maybe even one of my older jackets. Can I save them before it's too late?
    Thanks,
    Rob Sigond
    AMCA # 1811

  8. #28
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    209

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    Good question ... if Michael doesn't see this thread, you may want to send him a private message.
    Vic Ephrem
    AMCA #2590

  9. #29

    Smile

    Rob--Before I got into motorcycles, I rode horses, team penning, trail rides, Roundups,etc. Extreme Cowboy type stuff and I used neetsfoot oil liberally on my Circle Y saddles ( the best money can buy) and it seemed to work fine. So when I started Worsham Castle Cycle Leather, naturally I thought neetsfoot would work on all types of old motorcycle leather. Man O Man was I wrong. I ruined so many really good examples of COWHIDE saddlebags it would make one sick. Then I started doing research into leather, what does old leather need and how to acheive that goal. That is when I discovered a formula that attracts moisture while allowing the leather to breathe. That is the key, do not seal the leather, allow it to attract moisture and breathe!!!!!!!!!!! --Michael--WCCL

  10. #30
    Join Date
    Jan 2008
    Location
    Upstate NY
    Posts
    201

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    Michael,

    Yes, I'm fully converted over to the Rev. Paquette's Church of Moist Leather. But my question was, can I save, or better yet, should I try to save something that might have had an application of neatsfoot oil not too long ago?

    I'm not looking for you to reveal your secrets for restoring leather. That's like asking a magician to show you his tricks. I was just wondering for myself and perhaps others out there if we could reverse the damage done by an application or two of neatsfoot in the past by formerly heathen rider such as myself?

    And...since we are on the subject, is it every adviseable to spray Lexol on the rough leather side of a garment or set of bags? Or do we just spray on the smooth side and rub in?

    And if this was answered in previous posts by you, I apologize for asking again. This is why I think this site would profit (informationally and productively) by a Garage type of page for tech articles, how to's, etc.

    Thanks,
    Rob Sigond
    AMCA # 1811

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