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Thread: Leather Maintenance & restoration

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    209

    Smile

    Uh oh ... didn't mean to start (or re-start) TWII (Thread War II). Just for clarification, Mike, should the glycerine be used by itself, full strength, or simply considered as an ingredient. Is my proposed use of Lexol PH Cleaner followed by Lexol conditioner a sound choice? Thanks to both ... and I will not use Neats Foot oil on my Horsehide.
    Vic Ephrem
    AMCA #2590

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Location
    Central Florida
    Posts
    872

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    Quote Originally Posted by T. Cotten View Post
    Neat'sfoot oil is why these saddlebags hang upon my roof and not upon a machine: (attached).

    ....Cotten
    Cotten, what IS that up on your roof? Looks like a UL Chain on the other side, Big Twin oil tank, Big Twin kicker sidecover, Flat heads, but in a twin downtube frame with the front exhaust is coming out-the-side (?) Suggests a 36VLD top end on a UL bottom. Can't gauge scale, but it looks funny. Would you elaborate, please?

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    3,630

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    Sorry to get off topic, but since Sarge asked:

    There is nothing on my roof sign that should ever need to be retrieved. Everything is gutted and filled with 'fomofill' to attempt to keep the bird's nests to a minimum, and also welded together to prevent injury to passers by below.

    The right case was WL unearthed (literally) behind a local Indian dealer shack, and the heads were labeled "junk" when Rat Scherk contributed them fifteen years ago.

    The front of the frame is HD, but I think the rear was BSA. It came out of a golf course lake that way.

    Wheels are Beezers from a local gravel pit. I suspect the fender is Horex or Puch from the same dig.

    The center seat post is a vacuum cleaner 'wand'. The generator is a propane bottle. The headlamp clock is not wired, but set to "six to nine". The brake grip is an oilfilter wrench.

    The fork is a Paughco that dropped a buddy twice because he thought he could actually run a fender.

    The rest is almost what it appears to be,... well maybe sorta.... One thing that is missing is a lightning ground strap.

    Back to topic:
    It would be interesting to know what the true origin of the bags might be, as I always considered them just 'vintage aftermarket'.

    The bottoms sag badly now (from bird's nests), but the lids are still the way they petrified from the Neatsfoot oil. They have the color and consistancy of a coconut shell.

    ....Cotten

  4. #14

    Default

    As I have previously stated, Just do not use any type of oil to condition seats, saddlebags, or jackets.

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    3,630

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    Although I'm sure this will split hairs and get under somebody's skin somehow,

    I must point out that the prime concern in leather preservation is mold control.
    Many of you might have noticed that products like Mink Oil are mildew food!

    The apparent leader in combating this scourge is http://www.leathertherapy.com/

    Gawdforbid, they use a mix of oils.

    ....Cotten

  6. #16
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    Southeast WI
    Posts
    179

    Default Leather Maintenance

    I just picked up some "leather therapy" this week. It was recomended by some (horse people)
    that I know. Used it on both new and old seats and was very pleased. It seems to have a
    glyceryn content along with any oils. It"s not at all oily and penetrates easily and leaves a nice feel to the surface....Rod

  7. #17
    Join Date
    Jun 2001
    Location
    Central Illinois, USA
    Posts
    3,630

    Question

    Attached is a photo (ca. 1981) of the bags with horsehide lids before suffering from neat'sfoot oil. The lids were already slightly shrunken .
    Any information about them would be appreciated, TIA..

    While searching some vintage leather references, I was surprised that I could find information on nearly any other species than horse!
    Apparently the animals were too useful, and lived such longer lives than food animals that their hides were usually too battle-scarred for garments or upholstery.

    ....Cotten
    Attached Images Attached Images

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Mar 2008
    Location
    Jacksonville, FL
    Posts
    209

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    I think a lot of horsehide was used in the past as horses were much more plentiful ... they were used for farm and draft work. So a lot of old leather clothes were made of them. It is a heavier and thought to be tougher material, and seems perfect where you need real protection. Not as supple as other leathers for casual wear, but I feel a lot more protected with horsehide while on the bike. The interesting thing is that you can find a lot of vintage horsehide stuff on ebay, and there is so much of it, that you can find a large size, and while some of it is very expensive, if you keep your eye out, you can get a deal. I've paid less than $230 for two heavy horsehide jackets in good shape with great patina ... one longer and one shorter ... in sizes of 44 and 46. If I were buying a cheap, current production, lightweight leather jacket, I would have paid about the same ... much, Much more if I were looking for a quality jacket. One warning/question to ask of internet sellers however ... does it have an odor ... almost impossible to get odors out of old clothes.
    Vic Ephrem
    AMCA #2590

  9. #19
    Join Date
    Jun 2003
    Posts
    1,681

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    Michael, can the glyserin be a vegetable type extraction ? Thanks, Paps

  10. #20
    Join Date
    Feb 2003
    Location
    High in the B.C. Rockies....
    Posts
    5,353

    Smile

    For what it's worth Dykes Automobile and Gasoline Engine Encyclopedia indicates that for dressing all leather.............. Raw linseed oil and turpentine, mixed in proportions of two of the former to one of the latter, is a time-honored formula.
    Cory Othen
    Membership#10953

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