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joekam
01-13-2002, 06:25 PM
Does anyone have any good suggestions on how to remove recoil springs on my springer front end with ease? Thanks, Joe

Buster
01-14-2002, 11:35 AM
Not with ease, but I have used a large C clamp to compress the front and rear legs enough to remove top nuts and than gently release C clamp. Be sure the C clamp is large enough for the springs to fully decompress.

Perry Ruiter
01-16-2002, 01:22 AM
During a misspent youth I once assembled a
springer by compressing the springs in a bench
vise, using 3 or 4 large/heavy duty tie wraps to retain
the compression (equally spaced around the springs
and leaving the outermost coil on each end free).
Then assembled the springer and cut the tie wraps.
Since the springs on your assembled springer are
under pressure, presumably you could use tie wraps
to retain that compression and prevent the springs
from flying across the room on disassembly. I
guess in this day and age I should say I don't
recommend you try this and you are responsible
for your own safely. Don't do something dumb just
'cause I suggested it :(.
The "classic" approach to springer assembly
and disassembly is a large C clamp. Here's an
example:
http://www.conansclassics.com/tipforsprinf.html

Buster
01-16-2002, 08:52 AM
After compessing with C clamp, I use a motorcycle tie down strap placed around the upper and lower legs to keep legs compressed if C clamp moves after spring bolts are removed.

Tommo
01-18-2002, 04:43 AM
Hi There,
I made my fork spring compressor out of those bits that are too good to throw away but I don't know why I'm keeping them.
Firstly I took a turnbuckle that originally tensioned the wing wires on a Tiger Moth Aeroplane. At one end which we'll call the top I attached a Dee Shackle and two short lengths of chain. At the end of each piece of chain is another Dee Shackle which is attached to the two lugs through which the Ride Control and Headlamp mount bolt. At the bottom of the turnbuckle a single chain is attached and this drops down to a bar that is passed through the holes in the bottom of the moving fork. Tension the turnbuckle to compress the springs. It is preferable that the bar in the moving fork is secured by drilling and tapping each end and inserting a bolt and washer to stop it coming out.
I have dismantled and assembled several sets of forks and have never put the slightest mark on paintwork or brightwork.
Hope this is of some use.
Regards, Tommo

Tommo
01-18-2002, 12:53 PM
In my reply I forgot to mention that the moving and fixed forks tend to want to move away from each other when the springs are compressed so wrap each leg with cloth and hold them together with a rubber band. One cut from an old inner tube works just fine.
There is absolutely no danger to life or limb using this method.
Best of luck.
Tommo

mmoore
04-06-2008, 11:49 PM
[QUOTE=Perry Ruiter;43559]During a misspent youth I once assembled a
springer by compressing the springs in a bench
vise, using 3 or 4 large/heavy duty tie wraps to retain
the compression (equally spaced around the springs
and leaving the outermost coil on each end free).
Then assembled the springer and cut the tie wraps........now for my version
I did the same thing. got 3 of the springs tied just like you did. after I did the 4th I set it on the bench with the other 3. no sooner then setting it down I heard a tie pop. knowing that the other 2 would not probaly hold I stepped back.as the other 2 poped it knocked all the other 3 onto the floor were they proceeded to pop the ties also. now if you can stop laughing at me imangine this, it was late and one of them darn springs took out the only lite I had on over the bench. how I ever survived my youth I will never know