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Steve Swan
03-13-2014, 01:55 AM
i have not posted much of my 27 JD project, so i thought i'd share what i'm up to.

so will give my progress report ! i'm not as much of a picture take as i'd like to be, but i'll load all my pics in this thread, so as to keep things in one place.

my front fork assy, cyls, crankcases, generator drive case and frame are undergoing repairs and straightening. my machinist/motorcycle mechanic friend is making pushers so we can get the rod races out, he'll supervise me assembling/truing the flywheel assy (: i'm hoping all this repair/rebuild work will be finished by early winter, so i can start fitting all parts together for the "mock up" assembly stage..... (:

on the trans, i replaced all new shafts, gears, bearings, kick shaft bushing and silver soldered the split bushing on the new main shaft. i used a sealed ball bearing on the sprocket side of trans. i removed the seals of the new kick start side bearing so the kick start/clutch fork mechanisms get their lubrication. i did not use the brass oil retainers, since they have no actual sealing capability. i'm expecting the sealed large bearing will keep things dry on the sprocket side. sealed the open end of the counter shaft. adjusted end play on drive gear; shafts, gears turn/slide smoothly and shifts easily/crisply. the clutch release fork shafts fit snugly top and bottom and turns smoothly.

however i am s l o w l y dripping oil out of the lower shaft of the clutch release fork, i'm thinking since it's not sealed and steel on steel, it will leak........ ?

another question i have, the riders handbook says the mechanical oil pump comes adjusted from the factory with "one thick and three thin washers." what is the thickness of the thin and thick washers ?

since i'm using a fair amount of repro (like original) parts and my bike won't be exactly 100% correct, i've decided i'm going to do a tasteful, yet minimal over-restoration to suit my personal preferences, since i won't be showing the machine, just riding it for enjoyment. planning to go with 2k enamel urethane, hand pin striping/decals covered w/ clear. i'm thinking i will use minimally more nickle plating on select engine/chassis fasteners; the rest parkerized. my cyls are a rear 27 and an early 28 front, will be nickle plated, having the front spark plug hole converted to the older larger 27 size. if both bores weren't standard and the cylinders so intact, i'd look for a front 27. as it stands, it appears both std, not out of round bores can be honed to accept new std.pistons, i'm going with 8:1 Venolias. at worst, i will have to go to the 1st o.s.

my inspiration comes from my Dad on his 27 in ROTC uniform and his can of touch up paint. and, all you guys !

well for the moment, that's all i can think of.... i will appreciate any thoughts or comments on what i've posted !

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Steve Swan
03-13-2014, 01:57 AM
a couple more pics...

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gww
03-13-2014, 08:49 AM
morn n Steve, look n good, your moving right along. good on you. just trying to put a face to the name, where you at the meeting at Woodys Wheels monday? gary from Falcon

Steve Swan
03-13-2014, 10:18 AM
hi Gary, i can't remember being at Woody's.....

Steve Swan
05-17-2014, 11:30 AM
So, i've made it a little further ! posted pics of my generator drive case, the weld repair, new bushes in gears and complete assembly. of course the thin lip of the hole the generator shaft was over half broken out.

Next week i will have my crankcases back, will find a time in the near future when my friend and i can assemble and true the flywheels. Of course, using all new pins, roller bearings, bushings, etc. (from Comp.D.)

i've been studying the 1918 "MC Repair Manual for the Guidance of the MC Repair Man" how to size left and right bearings, then align bushed cases to fit flywheel assembly to cases.

What i am going to ask next is a HUGE favor, if anyone can and will help me.

When the time comes, since i'm fitting new, the right timing side bronze bushing and the left drive side steel bushing, it seems certain i'll need the lining bar GK-862. Would anyone who is brave enough and would trust me, loan me their tool ? i would pay insurance and postage to and from and some extra for gratitude to use the tool.

i could get my friend to make one up, but it will be more time and money to make a tool i'll only use once.

Thank you sincerely for your consideration and help to date.

Steve Swan 970.443.2432 sandcast232@...
Fort Collins , Colorado

PS planning to use aerosol Glyptal 1201-A to coat my inner cases, since i've seen other guys use Glyptal. Thoughts ?

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Steve Swan
05-17-2014, 11:34 AM
one last pics of gears in place spin easy and free.

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Steve Swan
09-02-2014, 01:41 AM
It's been a while since i last posted on my 27JD, i've actually got quite a bit of work done. here is a picture of the crankcase repair at the rear mount, unfortunately i did not take a picture of the rear mount pair of cracks that extended in to the crank pan it's self. Also a picture of my chassis assembly, making sure everything fits.

Steve Swan
01-17-2016, 12:08 AM
Well, it's been a year last September since my last post. Alot of progress has taken place. i will be posting pictures and will try to have some in depth photos as the project progresses. As you know, i basically started with a 27 frame, engine, trans, ft/rr wheel hubs. i have restored many motorcycles over the decades and had a much more full scale shop in an earlier life.... The JD is the "deepest" project i have ever taken on, and with a bent frame, broken crank cases, twisted and freeze burst forks, i will say i had quite a handful, especially considering i do not have the heavy equipment to do such major repairs, have a shortage of shop space and since i intend the 27 to be my only old motorcycle project, it does not seem practical nor is it economically feasible to buy the the equipment to bring back to life a restoration project of such depth. So, i decided i would need help from various guys who are familiar with JD's and work on them as a vocation/avocation. That being said, i must take the this space to sincerely thank several really great guys and hope to have the privilege of meeting them some day, as i do intend on attending a couple meets where these guys attend. So, a great thank you to: Mark Masa, Jon Neuman, Bob Luland, Tom Feeser, Marty MacCallom, Jim and Paul Osborne. and, of course the AMCA, for having this discussion board i have diligently studied. i feel really fortunate to have found such a great group of guys to aid my efforts, as i had never seen a JD until i bought mine and have spent many hours researching literature, studying pictures, talking to JD good fellows on the phone, email, etc. Although i am "doing it the hard way," i really am quite proud of the fact i am bringing a motorcycle back to life that started with not a whole lot there in the first place. about all i have left as far as missing parts go are some nuts, bolts, washers and a couple miscellaneous parts.

enclosed you'll find my frame on the lift. i am planning there will be two builds. the first "build" will be an actual fitting together of all the parts i have to make sure everything FITS like it's supposed to. The goal is to have a properly operating, well running motorcycle when the first build is complete. then i will take the bike apart and apply the different finishes to the various parts. Then the 2nd or final build of assembling the restored parts. i would really love to run the engine on a test stand before i actually drive the motorcycle down the road for the first time. we'll see........

i most definitely welcome and i do ask for constructive comments, particularly if you see me doing something or missing something that could be done a better/easier way, create a problem or be a mistake.

i will be post pics as things go together.

So anyway, here are a couple pics of frame on lift as well as a couple other pics of a couple restorations i just finished in my shop.

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Steve Swan
01-17-2016, 12:30 AM
Here is my lower end assembly, i just got it back from Truett & Osborne last month. They fit slightly undersize rollers to help trap oil in the lower end bearing assembly, the side play is .007" new bushings and drive side bearing race/bearings fitted. i intend to separate the cases, remove flywheel assembly, fit the left case to frame. after case is fit to frame, then will put cases together, install cylinder studs, install unassembled cylinders to cases and fit the engine "core" to lower and upper mounts. once engine's fitted to frame, then cases will come apart to be painted Olive Green. not quite ready to actually get to that point, as i am working on other projects, but pictures will follow. but, being at the stage where i could set the frame on the lift was a huge step forward. i am really excited, but i shall proceed methodically and deliberately. the cam is Mark Masa's.

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Steve Swan
01-17-2016, 10:01 AM
i have had the paint from my Dad's can of touch up paint matched, it appears to be an exact match.
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exeric
01-17-2016, 11:53 AM
They did get a good match, but they darn well should have considering the sample you gave them:)

Steve Swan
01-17-2016, 12:24 PM
They did get a good match, but they darn well should have considering the sample you gave them:)

:):):):):):):):):)

Tim, our local automotive Painter's Supply paint man is known in the region for having a good eye and experience matching paint. he is always pretty stoic when you talk to him, but paint is his passion. it was really great when i brought in that can of paint, he knew immediately it was pine based and said, "it can't be good." i told him my dad would never have opened the can, unless he had a use for the paint, which of course he would not have and my Dad, being a depression era working adult, would never "waste" the paint as well as the can was a link to his carefree youth. Tim literally grabbed the can out of my hands, said, "We'll see, i'll shake it up." He came back about 10" later with a "chip" from the can, SMILING BROADLY and said, "Matching this one is on me!"

enclosed is a pic of back side of can, before i got 27JD11090, over the decades i would look at, hold this can shake the can..... probably 15 years ago, it sprang a leak at the seam, leaking a delightful sticky smelly turpentine smell. VERY CONCERNING because i KNEW SOMEDAY, i would have a JD and would need that paint. So, i like triple wrapped the can in saran wrap and would periodically shake the can to see if i could hear fluid volume moving around, which i could and the sound of the contents when i would shake the can would always sound the same. So i was pretty confident when the day came, i'd have a sample of paint for a match..... And now... you have the rest of the story !

i also enclose pic of application instructions. What care and attention went in to building these motorcycle in that era.

One of the great things about this passion we have, who knew an old can of paint could be so much fun !

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Steve Swan
01-19-2016, 11:48 PM
Today, i got to spend some time with the JD.

First i fit the LH case to the frame. When the case was bolted at rear lug, i had about a .030" gap between front frame/case lugs. A very minimal amount of filing was required to relieve rust pitting on frame lugs and around the circumference of the holes in aluminum case lugs lugs. Front and rear the case lugs seat exactly flat against the frame lugs. 165061650516507

Next, installed cylinders. Top mounts are all Competition Distributing parts. The eccentric washers and inside of the forked area of the cylinder brackets were not smooth, the washers would not fit inside the bracket, so i polished them enough to create a slip fit. also the brackets were very slightly too wide to fit cleanly in the channel of the top frame lug, so i polished the edges to get a firm but sliding fit. 1650816509

Steve Swan
01-19-2016, 11:51 PM
Really is inspiring to see the engine in the frame...... !:D i will appreciate comments if i am missing something or not doing something correctly.
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Shaky Jake
01-20-2016, 09:07 AM
Excellent build Steve. I just read the whole thread. Thanks for sharing. I love the paint can story.

Kevin

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Steve Swan
01-20-2016, 10:05 AM
Excellent build Steve. I just read the whole thread. Thanks for sharing. I love the paint can story.

Kevin

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Thanks,Kevin. i regularly follow your PP thread, i enjoy it alot.

Yes, i remember that paint can since i was 6 years old and my Dad telling me about his Harley Davidson. it sat on a shelf in his garage for decades until he died 1991.

Steve Swan
01-23-2016, 07:55 PM
So, i am fitting together the chassis. all the parts are going together with only a minimum of adjustments.

however, i do not seem able to mount the horn properly. when i have the left side bolted to it's bracket i have at least 1" of gap on the right. because i cannot seem to fit the horn, i am led to believe:
1. i am assembling things wrong,
2. missing parts, or
3. the reproduction parts are not made to spec.

i would appreciate your help. thanks in advance.16550

Steve Swan
01-27-2016, 11:22 PM
sometimes i'm too smart, i figured out the "non-issue" why the spacing was off for the horn brackets. i tightened down the 4965-25 headlight mounting brackets/rods and the spacing issue for the horn brackets solved it's self.

more pics of more progress today. Tomorrow, painting crank cases, trans case, hubs, rims and a few other parts Olive Green.

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Steve Swan
01-27-2016, 11:23 PM
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Steve Swan
01-27-2016, 11:42 PM
i thought i'd post some pics of a couple relatively unmolested 26's and a what looks to be a nice 27 restoration. i have been using these bikes as examples for guiding my work.

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Steve Swan
01-27-2016, 11:45 PM
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Steve Swan
01-27-2016, 11:48 PM
and of the 2716590165911659216593

Steve Swan
01-29-2016, 12:02 AM
Today i Parkerized a few parts, intake manifold, front and rear wheel parts and a few nuts, washers. easy and fun ! i draw filed the forging the transmission sits on, it cleaned up really fine with minimal work, there are some pits but nothing that will affect fit or function. i fit the gear shifter lever to the tank and to the shifter guide. also, i am enclosing some pics of when Marty MacCallom straightened the frame.

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Steve Swan
01-29-2016, 12:09 AM
i also ran my horn wire and installed the horn button. and pics of the frame at Mary MacCallom's when he was repairing and straightening the frame.

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Steve Swan
02-14-2016, 07:09 PM
here's 4 of the latest pics of my painted crank cases, transmission, rims and hubs. man 'o man ! i am really impressed with what a beautiful color Olive Green actually is. it may help that green's my favorite color........... but i cannot help but think when striping is on, the green will be even more beautiful ! or just call me crazy, since i am the one who has to live with the one and only color H-D offered in 1927 ! using Dad's can of touch up paint to match original color makes me feel in a way, almost like i am resurrecting his 27....

i used Glyptal on the inside of the crank cases. only place i am going to use it. installed a few parts on the cases. will let the Glyptal cure til Monday evening, then plan to set left case in the engine stand, then assemble lower end.

getting to point where i will be installing timing gear cover, i will be having questions about the 2 same size small round spacers that go on 2 of the long screws that hold gear cover on to crankcases.

hope to make contact with Buchanan's this week, get my rims/hubs boxed up and sent to them. also, Tuesday, should be getting my 3.85x20 diamond tread clincher tires and tubes from Coker. will be a real milestone to get road ready wheels on bike. and engine and trans in frame. Am doing a good job of not getting overly excited !

Also, will get transmission assembled while i am waiting for wheels to return from Buchanan's

Good stuff !16884168831688216881

Steve Swan
02-16-2016, 08:50 AM
i feel like i've entered the promised land. Assembled my lower end last night.

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gww
02-16-2016, 01:53 PM
excellent.........

Steve Swan
02-17-2016, 03:13 PM
got my brake linings installed.

mock fitted cyls, exh.valve stems a little too long. talked with Andy at Comp.D who i purchased valves from. he said it's typical to have to take a little distance off the stems. my extra length is enough that i'll have to free hand grind some of the distance off so my friend can do the squaring off in his valve grinding machine.

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MassHarley
02-27-2016, 04:39 PM
Steve the bike is looking great! Keep up the great work, each time you add a part it helps with the motivation to continue!

Steve Swan
02-27-2016, 04:42 PM
Thanks Mark ! It's kind of like decorating a Christmas tree..... in slow motion !!!! more pics to come !

Steve Swan
02-28-2016, 12:09 AM
so, i've actually made quite a bit of progress the past week. first i need to say, i cannot seem to stop myself when in the middle of processes to take pictures. i seem to get in my "zone" and can't quit until i am finished...... so, my 'build' does not have a lot to show for how i am actually getting things done. it seems nearly every repro part i am using requires 'adjustment' to fit properly.

i installed sealed bearings in my transmission and fitted Jon Neuman's VL countershaft gear kit, so i did not fit the large and small brass oil retainers. adjusted the main shaft end play to around .003".

the clutch is built from Bob Luland's very fine parts, Mark Masa's very fine clutch hub sprocket. the clutch hub bearing kit is from Comp.D and the race it's self was about .020" too wide so needed to be ground down to turn freely when the clutch main shaft nut was tightened.

in my previous pics, i showed the exh.valve stems being too long, the cylinders would not fit on crankcase base. i cut them down free hand to .010" over stock so my friend could face them off square in his valve grinding machine. then i had to cut off about 6 threads length from the inlet push rods, now the cylinders seat on the crankcase base.

Monday, i plan to get pistons in the bores, then get the upper end assembled.

i also got my little 3/16 copper tube for the tail light wire installed. i am using a Tom Feeser tail.stop light setup, so i am going to have to get creative and deviate from original wiring to accommodate 2 wires going through that little tube.... i think i'm going to use that high tech hi-ampere very small gauge thin strand silver speaker wire or something like it. not really familiar with that type of wire, but it should work for the tail/stop light, i'll cover the wire with cloth sheathing so it can't be seen.

i would like to thank David Butts for doing all my clutch riveting work. (i will call you tomorrow evening David, sorry i have not returned your call earlier....)

i'm also starting a new thread on timing gear covers, seems i'm a little confused on which cover is correct for 27....

i should have my 20" clincher wheels back from Buchanan's around the middle of March ! going with ss spokes and nickle plated nipples.....

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Steve Swan
03-01-2016, 05:51 AM
Getting closer.... pistons installed, upper end buttoned up. next, need to make a tool to go in to top cyl mount to measure BTDC.16995169961699716998

Steve Swan
03-01-2016, 09:46 PM
got my gen/time installed. discovered the rear exhaust goes on before the the generator does !

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Steve Swan
03-05-2016, 11:37 PM
A little more progress today. i made a TDC finding tool and degree measurement tool.

i have downloaded, printed off and read the "Timing" information by "flamingoesd" in jd yahoo grps

1. Timing ignition is done off the front cylinder ?

2. I would appreciate hearing your experience the best BTDC measurement ? i'm using domed Venolia pistons, so i suppose that is the more or less equivalent of a "Rici head" ? Dan Margolien wrote me he has his 26 set at 5/16" i have heard 3/8" but do not have 1st hand source such as from Dan.

3. for full advance, is the timer turned forward ?

4. i am used to setting ignition points just opening at the BTDC position. Would this be correct procedure when measuring setting ignition timing by BTDC ?

5. i have also read the procedure to time ignition in the 1927 Rider's Hand Book. i had read it probably well over a year ago..... long enough that i forgot i read it.

A. As you all know, the Hand Book discusses timing ignition with timer set in full advance position, does not state which direction timer is moved to be in full advance direction?? But then, i can look at which way the narrow end of cam moves relative to the heel of the points cam.... ?

B. Instructions go on to say, compound gear is removed.

C. "turn generator in direction in which it operates (to left) (this is counterclockwise?) until the "narrow end of the circuit breaker cam has separated contact points about one half their full opening."

D. then fit compound gear.

E. i realize this procedure has to work, it has been used thousands of times.... the contact points being separated "about one half their full opening creeps me out. specifically, it the word "ABOUT" that creeps me out..... it seems relying on the alignment of the marks on the gears and the points "about" half open opens the possibility for an incorrect setting relative to BTDC....

F. i guess i could measure the distance between points closed and fully open, divide the distance and then guess at "about one half"might be.... and i guess i could measure the btdc of the piston when the marks are aligned and the points are "about" half open.

Anyway..... i guess i am writing all this out for 3 reasons..... 1 is that i have a clear understanding what the procedure is and 2 someone will tell me my understanding is correct or incorrect and 3 just tell me what the TDC/BTDC measurement is. The more i think about this, i realize it might be possible the only BTDC setting there is is the setting at which the engine starts easily and runs without knocking or overheating......

also made up 3391-25 control coil clip from some ss scrap, but the dimensions are not right, so i'm pretty sure i won't be able to live with it.

Also pics of oil i plan to use, 50w, aviation ashless dispersant, a friend has several quarts left over from when his Dad was alive and had a plane; years ago..... So, we both think it's pretty cool oil his Dad used in his plane is going in a 27JD like my Dad rode.

Steve Swan
03-05-2016, 11:39 PM
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Steve Swan
03-06-2016, 11:22 PM
so, today i got the ignition timed, valves adjusted, leak down tested. engine in frame. All is good. what a piece of artwork. i'm thinking of making up an adapter to use my dial indicator to set the timing.

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Steve Swan
03-13-2016, 10:10 PM
sort of pinching myself. the engine is finished.

koanes
03-15-2016, 09:23 AM
Looking good Steve. The dome on your custom piston may change your measurement for timing, depending on point of contact with your indicator. I would use Dan's number to start and use a light to determine just when the points open, advancing your distributor towards the rotation of the points cam. Make sure your points gap is correct. That should get you in the ballpark.

alanc48
03-16-2016, 07:21 PM
I didn't know you had a build thread going here, awesome! Now I don't have to sift through the yahoo! group for your pics :cool:

Steve Swan
03-17-2016, 12:31 AM
Thanks Al !

got my gorgeous wheels back from Buchanan's yesterday. The rims are from Al McRoberts.

i remember my Dad telling me when he was a young fellow he owned a 1917 Model T and saying "Getting the tires over the clincher rims was a real bear cat."

setting the the wheels on top of the tires and pretending to attempt to start the tire on the rim already has me beat up. everything i've read and what the guys have shared, tire changes were recommended to be done by hand. Sumo wrestling these tires on my pretty rims, i concede the match. i am going to make up a tool to stretch the tire so i can more or less slip it over the rim. (see the thread i started asking for advice getting these tires on the rims.)

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Steve Swan
03-17-2016, 01:11 AM
i realized i did not have any pics of my "control panel," so here is.

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Steve Swan
03-17-2016, 11:44 PM
well, nothing fantastic in this post, i laced up the repro Kelsey-Hayes rims to a spare set of hubs i have.... when i first got my my bike, i decided i wanted to use the d.c. rims instead of clinchers as i did not want to have a vintage style accident -and- i did not know about Al McRoberts..... the more pictures i collected, the more attracted i was to the appearance of the clinchers, the nice clean center, the larger more bicycle looking diameter and original eqpt..... So, when i found out Al produces clinchers, i could not resist. anyway..... not sure where this post is going, but i am going to have 2 complete sets of wheels when i am finished. decided to paint the d.c.'s black as i figured black was probably a standard color for the rims. as easy as wheel changes are, it won't be any big deal to swap back and forth.

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Steve Swan
03-25-2016, 10:47 PM
So, here's few miscellaneous pics, after i assembled foot boards and Parkerized the side bars. Pic with rear wheel speedometer drive installed is from today.

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Steve Swan
03-31-2016, 03:23 AM
some of you have read my thread under "clincher... help!" well, i decided to man up and get the 3.85x20 tires on my rims. the wife is gone. so, i brought the wheels home and warmed the tires up on the stove. definitely a process, but not that difficult but definitely memorable. here's some pics of the process and the outcome. the larger rims and tires are really beautiful. and really fill out the rear fender nicely.

one tip i will offer, use a block of wood, 2x6 works good, makes pushing the bead on easier. the hardest part was getting the first bead to seat enough to clear the hole in rim to get the tube stem through the hole in the rim. the 2nd bead would be inverted when on rim, but a slight amount of air pressure pushed the bead in position. i got one scratch on each rim where the stem would rub the rim, even with a plastic tube around the steel stem.

anyway, i should have my sprocket back from the nickle plater.

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Steve Swan
03-31-2016, 03:25 AM
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exeric
03-31-2016, 09:24 AM
Good thing your wife was out.

TechNoir
03-31-2016, 12:43 PM
Good thing your wife was out.

X2.

I am sure that both Steve and his wife will both be happier if she doesnt know.

My wife and I are both much happier that she doesn’t know how good the dishwasher is at cleaning things other than dishes.

John

Steve Swan
04-20-2016, 11:41 PM
So, more progress......... !

1st is picture of the spanners i had made up for tightening the sprocket and brake drum ring nuts.

2nd is picture of 2 different types of cylinder primer cups. one is original, the other reproduction. which type is correct for 27 ? another question, is the reproduction an accurate copy ? looking at 22-27 and 27-31 parts books, looks like there is no distinction between the two, one pn = 49-14. somewhere, and i cannot find where, i thought i saw the flat face (repro) was correct through 29...... and the cupped primer 1930-onward.........?

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Peter Cooke
04-21-2016, 02:10 AM
Steve,

The Replicant Metals website shows the cupped primer for 1930 -36. It has some good pictures of both types for comparison purposes.

Hope this helps.

Steve Swan
04-21-2016, 02:37 AM
Thanks, Peter! Thaaaats where i saw the 2 types... and, that's where my questions came from..... my original 27-31 parts book show only one pn for the primer cups, "49-14..................1915 to 1931" i am assuming the original 49-14 cups are flat.

Steve Swan
04-28-2016, 04:19 AM
Major progress.

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Steve Swan
04-28-2016, 10:26 AM
More pics. won't be able to continue for a few days, when i get back to my shop, will clean up tanks, install, then on to wiring and miscellaneous details.

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Steve Swan
05-13-2016, 01:10 PM
started working around 2pm and went til midnight. got control cables cut to length, spark and throttle adjusted and cleaned tanks. (the spark control coil could be about 2.5 inches longer, the ordered length of 60 inches is just short.) I'd appreciate knowing who to contact to buy a length longer than 60 inches. Next, on to wiring and getting the clutch controls.

these little round connectors, how do they attach to the wire ? seems there is probably a tool necessary to do the crimping ? what does the tool look like ? or, where can i purchase one ?

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Steve Swan
05-13-2016, 01:12 PM
here is a picture of the eyelet

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Steve Swan
05-13-2016, 01:43 PM
one more pic

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exeric
05-13-2016, 02:38 PM
You've really made some progress Steve, and your efforts really show. In regards to the wire grommet, I would suspect it would be very similar to a grommet tool used for canvas tents, tarps, etc. I'll bet you could find some good pictures of the tooling on the web, or ebay. It's possible there is a tool set just for your size, but I think you could easily make one on a lathe.

TechNoir
05-14-2016, 05:30 AM
Its looking good Steve. Not far to go, I bet you are itching to get it finished and ride it.

Looking forward to your next update.

John

Steve Swan
05-17-2016, 08:34 PM
i now have the bike wired. i was able to find a 14 amp hour sealed lead acid battery that fits perfectly inside the plastic faux original battery case Replicant sells. i stuck high density foam on the battery it's self and the dimensions are now the exact dimensions of the inside of the case. once the clutch pedal and clutch pull rod are ready to use, the bike will be ready to start and test ride.

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Steve Swan
05-17-2016, 08:53 PM
Its looking good Steve. Not far to go, I bet you are itching to get it finished and ride it.

Looking forward to your next update.

John

that will be a big day for sure ! i'm finding at age 64+ i'm no even close to the hurry i used to feel 20 or even 10 years ago ! i do have a bit of content anticipation, though ! 11090 will be ready when it is ready ! i'm still in a bit of disbelief i'm at the stage the bike could actually be started.

MMasa
05-17-2016, 10:14 PM
Steve
What's the make and part number of that sealed lead acid battery?
My friend Geoff Erdos makes that case that Replicant sells and I'm sure Geoff would like to know about a battery that fits. Especially a 14AH battery.
Thanks
Mark Masa

Steve Swan
05-17-2016, 10:36 PM
Steve
What's the make and part number of that sealed lead acid battery?
My friend Geoff Erdos makes that case that Replicant sells and I'm sure Geoff would like to know about a battery that fits. Especially a 14AH battery.
Thanks
Mark Masa

Mark, this is the exact same battery i purchased today - SLAA6-14A

link to actual battery - https://www.batteriesplus.com/Battery/Emergency-Lighting-and-Security/Teledyne/118=0013/SLAA6=14A

were original batteries 20 amp hours ?

due to battery's 5-1/2" height, i had to lay (sealed) battery on it's side for it to fit, but with high density foam, it's exactly perfect. the inside of the case is 5" tall. there is another 1/4" height on inside of cover, so if one tries to fit battery upright, there is approximately a 1/4" gap between top of case and bottom of cover. even with this gap, the case with battery in it will fit inside the steel battery box.

ps - i just sent you a pm

Steve Swan
05-31-2016, 08:47 PM
well, i was puttering around the shop with little to do, waiting on parts for a couple projects and was about ready to leave shop and i suddenly became possessed with the idea to start the JD......... i had spoke earlier in the day to a friend and he asked if i had started the bike yet, of course i said no....... the conversation apparently could not leave my head. i had turned the lights off over my bench and was just getting ready to turn off the main shop lights when i did an about face, went over to a can of gas i had, dumped in what little there was in the reserve tank. i then turned the gas on, no leaks anywhere, so gave 2 "prime" kicks. put it on "start" and kick #1, nothing. kick #2 and she fired and stayed running. and did not quit. DAMN !!!! WOW !!!! ME OH MY OH ME OH MY !!!! :):cool: so, i turned the fan on. let it run about 3 minutes. responded perfectly to retard and advance, lovely chug, chug a chug chug, chug a chug.. a bit rich, but not by much. Generator generates current. can't figure out how to up/down or whatever load the video from my phone to my computer..... will get my camera, i think i will have better luck with it. MORE TO COME ! i will bet it's been at least 50-60 years since this engine has run !!!!! what a wonderful thing to resurrect a motorcycle from the dead.

frichie68
05-31-2016, 09:04 PM
A little excited were ya? OUTSTANDING-OH MY GAWD THAT'S FUN!!!

Steve Swan
05-31-2016, 09:14 PM
Cain't hep me sef.

Peter Cooke
06-01-2016, 04:48 AM
That is awesome Steve. Well done!

harleytoprock
06-01-2016, 06:09 AM
Hey Steve, Congratulations! It's such a thrill when, after so much time, it becomes alive. Good job!

TechNoir
06-01-2016, 07:47 AM
Fantastic news Steve.

I love it when you bring a motor back from the dead, it is a unique feeling and I always get a big thrill from it.

John

gww
06-01-2016, 08:42 AM
congrats on blow n smoke..

painterdale
06-01-2016, 08:02 PM
Too cool! Congratulations! Dale

Steve Swan
06-01-2016, 11:00 PM
here is youtube of 27JD 11090 https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MPIyXioPVgE

frichie68
06-01-2016, 11:18 PM
Beautiful-and sounds great!

Steve Swan
06-21-2016, 09:41 PM
Another major milestone. i'm guessing it's been more than 50 years since this old fellow has been rolled on it's own wheels into the sunlight.

Temps in high 90's.... too hot for a test ride. Maybe tomorrow, high is supposed to be 86....... we shall see.

i've wanted a JD for 40 years, so a waiting a few more days or even weeks for moderate temperature day is no problem.

17667176661766817669

TechNoir
06-22-2016, 02:48 AM
Steve, this is fantastic news and you must be very pleased to have got this far. I am looking forward to your feedback after you have been for a ride.

John.

Shaky Jake
06-22-2016, 07:47 AM
Very nice, Steve. Can't wait to see the test ride video!


Kevin

.

exeric
06-22-2016, 07:50 AM
I have really enjoyed watching your progress on the '27 Steve. Your attention to detail, and your tenacity to get things right is very impressive; as well as inspiring. The beauty part is; we can look forward to the de-bug process, and the paint work on the sheet metal. Thanks for all the pictures too.

Steve Swan
06-22-2016, 09:04 AM
Thank you gentleman for your kind words. i would have liked very much to done a thread such as either you fellows do, but it seemed the old fellow would demand all my concentration every time i attended to him. There's a possibility the ride could be today.... forecast stands for 84 degrees. right now it is overcast and cool, but it's only 7 am. assuming temp stays as forcasted, my son will be coming over later today to follow me on the little old YG1-K survivor. hopefully he can take a video with my phone. (i ain't got no go-pro.)

Tire pressure is at at 40 psi front and rear. What psi would you suggest ?

Steve Swan
06-22-2016, 09:11 AM
also enclosed is pic of two parts i cannot seem to figure out the order of assembly of: 2462-15 pull rod adjusting collar and 2466-15 pull rod lock washer..... (also, the parts book call for quantity 2 of 0125 nuts, 1 adjusting nut and 1 lock nut (3/8-24 x 1/4 x 5/8)

if i install 2462-15 on the release rod rod BEHIND 2505-19 actuating plate, i cannot disengage clutch, so it seems logical 2462-15 does not go behind 2505-19.

if i install 2462-15 on the release rod on the outside of the 2505-19 actuating plate, the 2nd 0125 nut does not have enough threads on the release rod to fully thread on the rod. with 2462-15 -and- 2466-15, there is not enough threads for the lock nut to thread on to rod. (of course, the rod i sent you and the rod you built are identical in length.) (i don't quite understand the purpose or function of 2462-15....?) (or 2466-15 for that matter.)

as it is, i have fitted, the 2466-15 pull rod lock washer, with the 0125 nuts atop the 2466-15 washer.

not ever having seen a 1927 clutch release rod 2445-26, i can only assume the rod i have is a 1927 rod, which does measure 12-9/16" long as per noted in 1927-1931 parts book, the book says this rod fits 1926-1929 61" and 74" twins.

17670

Steve Swan
06-22-2016, 09:13 PM
O-KAY !!!!!!! please read my caption on the youtube. cover your ears and grit your teeth ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QeF8H85BHX8

what the heck. for your additional viewing pleasure.......... ka... Boom ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qDc82r7Yg88

frichie68
06-22-2016, 10:20 PM
Just a minor adjustment! Nice ride, bet that was a kick!
I'm a "front-stuffer" as well, mine are all caplocks.

Steve Swan
06-22-2016, 10:32 PM
Just a minor adjustment! Nice ride, bet that was a kick!
I'm a "front-stuffer" as well, mine are all caplocks.

"Front-stuffer"...... i like it !

TechNoir
06-23-2016, 04:11 AM
Steve, I clicked on the youtube link and I got the message "This video has been removed by the user"

John

Steve Swan
06-23-2016, 12:14 PM
Yesterday was a day of major excitement after 30 years of dreaming about this moment and 35 months of getting this old fellow ready for this moment. So yesterday, i just HAD to KNOW how the bike would do, going down the road, even at least for a few minutes. in my area, there is NO roads with low or no traffic, to do any decent test riding and bring tools for any required readjustments. So, i pushed the bike 4 blocks up to a quiet neighborhood that has a modest 1.1 mile loop. As it turns out, the 2 brief rides including riding back to the shop were exactly 3 miles according to the Corbin speedometer. That being said, my first 1.1 test loop was not videoed and went well, the clutch would disengage to shift in to first gear. after a brief cool down and this loop to be recorded on video, after the start up, i was not surprised but a bit dismayed the clutch would not disengage enough to shift into first gear. So there was some knashing of teeth. That being said, i deleted the previous video and posted the below edited versions.

It's really good to have this initial ride done, the bike's back at the shop on the lift. We'll be ready for more extended test riding after I've done some readjustments.

My plan is to wait for a cool day, probably towards Fall, then head east with my tools to remote country road and spend the better part of the day riding the bike, letting it cool down, make the necessary adjustments during this fitting in and break in period. Having a piece of quiet road where i can ride a distances necessary to get the carburation adjusted properly will be really nice.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UKrGoYaRCJM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8BHZyHi7gr4

Shaky Jake
06-23-2016, 01:56 PM
Woohoo! Yoicks and away!


Kevin

Steve Swan
06-23-2016, 09:07 PM
here's pics of my ft/rr spark plugs. i'm more interested in hearing your comments what you think of what you see than what i think i see.

Slow speed needle set at just under 7/8 turn from fully closed.

High speed needle set at just under 1-1/4 turns from fully closed.

1768117682

harleytoprock
06-23-2016, 09:38 PM
Steve, Congrats on the maiden voyage!!! With today's gas, spark plug reading is a thing of the past. Best to tune for best running and error a little on the rich side for a new motor. Also for a new motor,I like to add 6oz of synthetic 2 cycle oil to each gallon of gas for the first couple of hundred miles. Have fun and best wishes!

Steve Swan
06-23-2016, 10:57 PM
Thanks fort he tip on synth.2stroke oil. i have some amsoil synth i run in my old Yamaha's.

TechNoir
06-24-2016, 02:43 AM
Steve, well done in resurrecting this bike. You must feel tremendously satisfied to have got to this milestone.



John

Steve Swan
06-24-2016, 10:13 AM
Steve, Congrats on the maiden voyage!!! With today's gas, spark plug reading is a thing of the past. Best to tune for best running and error a little on the rich side for a new motor. Also for a new motor,I like to add 6oz of synthetic 2 cycle oil to each gallon of gas for the first couple of hundred miles. Have fun and best wishes!

Thanks for your comments on today's "gasoline." i'm looking forward to a test ride in the country where i can ride any distance necessary to get my carburation adjusted.

T. Cotten
06-24-2016, 11:14 AM
Steve!

As Harleytoprock reminds us, injector cleaners and other fuel additives will make plugs appear lean even when in perfect tune.
So much color at all means an over-rich condition. This is often because the motor will not run any other way, because of a vacuum leak. And since your plugs are not equal, I would suspect more leakage to the rear than the front.

You bubble-tested your manifold assembly, right?
(Had to ask, sorry.)

....Cotten

Steve Swan
06-24-2016, 01:46 PM
Tom, i appreciate your sequential order of identifying the appearance of fuel mixture burn on each spark plug to diagnose air leaks. No, i did not bubble test. I would appreciate being able to talk with you on the telephone. When could i call you ?

T. Cotten
06-24-2016, 01:59 PM
Steve!

A hearing impairment makes telephones difficult for me, but you can always email me direct at libertynightshift@gmail.com

A big rubber stopper gets you most of the way: http://virtualindian.org/11techleaktest.html

Although a testplate upon the manifold is most convenient, a stopper is the only way to test the inlet nipples separately.

Any stone unturned hides something that will bite you...

....Cotten

Steve Swan
06-24-2016, 02:11 PM
Tom, i will thoroughly read the link you sent me. Then i will email you any questions i have. Thank you so much for your comments. I don't want to leave any stones unturned !

TechNoir
06-24-2016, 02:26 PM
A big rubber stopper gets you most of the way: http://virtualindian/org/11techleaktest.html

I noticed that the link has a syntax error. It should be:

http://virtualindian.org/11techleaktest.html

John

T. Cotten
06-24-2016, 05:48 PM
Thanks TechNoir!

I should just cut'n'paste instead of typing, but force of habit, against a failing memory, got the better of me.
(After sixteen years, you would think I would have had it memorized...)

....Cotten

Steve Swan
08-18-2016, 12:11 AM
It's been awhile since i posted, the temps have been in the upper 90's every day til this past weekend. My friend, Al Larsen and my youngest son Sam, we went out east of town 60 miles, for the first longer test ride. The engine was driven at speeds between 25 and 40 mph. overall, i have to say the run went flawlessly and was a 100% success. sans DLX38, i bubble tested the intake system, no leaks. i smoke tested with carb on, there as a leak between carb and manifold, both of which were both freshly milled flat. the gasket material had to be the culprit, so i used 3 bond to seal the gasket. the front inlet rocker clearance had tightened from the first 3 mile run to barely .001" After these minor adjustments, the engine will start reliably 1st kick and very responsive to advance/retard. from idle to underway, the throttle response was immediate, a very slight spitting through carb which was cured by turning hi-speed needle out 2 notches. burn on front and rear plugs uniform and identical. i think i am on the way to having a good solid JD. you can youtube videos at Swan 1927 JD

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=As2-wAmG-Us

Steve Swan
08-21-2016, 11:18 AM
for your (and my) viewing pleasure https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbEGg-TabUI

Steve Swan
11-07-2016, 12:27 AM
It's been a while since i posted, so i thought it good to update all those who have helped me so much getting my JD on the road.

i had a couple minor setbacks fter my 1st test run back in August, none of which were fortunately of any serious consequence.

The short of it, i went for my 2nd test run today, 21 miles 1st run, 6 miles 2nd run. Both went flawlessly. i started the engine 4 different times. 2 prime kicks with switch off, started 1st kick cold 2 times. started 2nd kick hot engine 2 times. warm up took about 3-4 minutes and taking off in 1st gear with no hesitation, no spitting out the carb or popping from the exhaust. has a lovely idle, "chuffing" evenly at full retard and responds very nicely rolling into full advance. the shift into 1st gear is perfectly silent and shifts smoothly from 1st to 2nd to 3rd. had some nice longer hills, a couple with decent grades, slowing down and lightly lugging engine, acceleration was smooth, great power, wound up turning slow speed needle 1 notches richer and high speed needle 2 notches richer. varying the throttle, ran speeds of 35-50 mph, with a little steady speed work around 40 mph. ALL GOOD. both spark plugs were equal in color, each a nice light tan on the insulator. no smoke out the exhaust. shined a light into spark plug holes to see what i could of bores and saw no abnormal signs of wear. before i started out, i gave the crank case 4 shots of oil and when i turned around at mile 10.5, i gave it one shot for the way back. i drained the oil when i got back and had a little over half full in an 16 ounce cup. the rear brake only certainly forces one to be ever mindful when preparing for stops ! a couple miles underway, i was much more comfortable this 2nd round and had a confidence in the bike and myself. alot goes on with these old fellows when they're running and at speed ! i have a sense of satisfaction and relief and do feel ready to begin the final restoration which will make for a really great Winter project. i will be posting pictures when the time comes. A BIG THANK YOU to all of you who have helped me get my JD on the road. Can't help but think of my Dad and what he experienced, in particular his ride the Summer of 1927, when he rode from Cincinnati to Hartington, Nebraska, much of which i am sure was on unpaved roads for 850 miles. my 32 year old boy was with me, he drove behind me and really enjoyed the experience. i got a kick out of watching his eyes widen and seeing his big smile when the old fellow started on the 1st kick for the first run !

Sincerely,

Steve Swan

185961859718598

Steve Swan
11-07-2016, 01:56 AM
Thought i'd post a couple pics of my Dad during '27 on his '27. i posted these on another thread a while back, but don't have these on this thread.......1859918600186011860218603

Steve Swan
11-07-2016, 01:59 AM
Dad made and sold Brown Bobbi Greasless Donuts when he went to the Univ.of Cincinnati.... he took the side car body off the frame and built this delivery car.1860418605

frichie68
11-07-2016, 08:03 AM
Fantastic photos and family history, definitely deserves a big LIKE!

pfindlay
12-02-2016, 01:42 AM
Steve, thanks for a great thread and all the tips you've been able to pass on.

I'm making slow progress on my 25 JD and wondering what you did about aligning the cases? I saw a post way back where you were asking about the HD alignment tool. Did you find one,or use another method?

Peter

Steve Swan
12-02-2016, 11:58 AM
in the end, i was not able to find locally the experience and tools that i necesary to align the cases to the completed flywheel assembly. i wound up sending my entire lower end to Truett and Osborne in Wichita to do that job.

Steve Swan
03-02-2017, 10:39 PM
OK !!!! :cool: :cool: :cool: :cool:

TOMORROW MORNING i go to the man who does my paint work to pick up my frame, forks, rear stand, handlebars and other parts not requiring striping !!!!

i will begin posting pictures of the build. i am planning and expecting the build process to be a somewhat slow one, as i am going to be as methodical and deliberate as i know how to be, as well as i am waiting for a few parts to come back from the man who does my nickle plating. And, i don't know when the striped parts will be finished, i would guess over the next month or so, the striping will be by hand, so will take some time, as the man who does the striping will come to the painter's shop to do his striping work.

TechNoir
03-03-2017, 12:34 PM
How exciting!

John

painterdale
03-03-2017, 07:14 PM
It must feel like Christmas at your house, Steve! How's it look?
Dale

Steve Swan
03-04-2017, 01:40 AM
Ok ! so here we are !! got the paint back today !!! (the fenders, tanks, striped parts are not finished yet.)

i decided on a bit of overkill on the paint, so everything is going to be covered in clear........ i know that is not correct for original, but i wanted a shiny bike, and i wnated my decals and striping protected, so this was my only splurge in to bling-bling.

i am going very slowly, i have it in my head completion the final build will be up to 3 months.

so, here are the first of more pictures to follow as the process goes forward.

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TechNoir
03-04-2017, 04:27 AM
I love it. I cant wait to see more.

John

Rooster
03-04-2017, 11:25 AM
I'll be following along, too- who can resist a restoration build thread?
(And for what it's worth, I think the clear coat is just fine!)

harleytoprock
03-04-2017, 11:32 AM
Steve, Will it be clear coat on base coat or over a single stage paint?

Steve Swan
03-04-2017, 11:44 AM
Steve, Will it be clear coat on base coat or over a single stage paint?

Base covered by clear. "2stage" i believe the paint is called. The base is dull, the clear gives it gloss.

Steve Swan
03-07-2017, 12:23 AM
I got the engine fitted in the frame. waiting on nickle plating from the fellow who does very fine work. also a picture of my tool kit of which i am quite proud of. i have 3 repro combination wrenches and 3 original. THANKS AGAIN TOMMO !!! also the very fine Sparton AJM horn tag. THANKS AGAIN MARCIN !!! the original tag was stamped 6 19 28, of course a year newer than the year of manufacture of my 27JD. i decided to stamp my Dad's birthday on the tag, 3 13 27, he was born in 1906. i am mindful of every part i put on the bike, i think of each person who has helped me, so many fine people, i could not have been this far without the help i have received.

19293192921929119298

Steve Swan
03-07-2017, 12:25 AM
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harleytoprock
03-07-2017, 05:11 PM
Steve, Looking fantastic! Dad has a big smile !

Steve Swan
03-09-2017, 01:07 AM
Steve, Looking fantastic! Dad has a big smile !

Thank you so much for your kind words. You've been a great help to me setting the ignition timing on my engine. Still somewhat patiently waiting on my nickle to arrive !

exeric
03-09-2017, 09:01 AM
Your '27 is looking fantastic, Steve; and you do superb work. I loved the video of your ride, looks like you're going 90 :)

Steve Swan
03-09-2017, 10:48 AM
Your '27 is looking fantastic, Steve; and you do superb work. I loved the video of your ride, looks like you're going 90 :)

thanks Eric, for your compliment, i am doing the best i can. the old fellow has taught me a lot at different levels, personal inside and out.

Steve Swan
03-24-2017, 01:02 AM
my nickle finally arrived, beautiful work, worth the wait. so i was able to assemble and install the forks, assemble the trans lid and set up the shift shaft. will assemble the handlebars next. about as far as i can go til my fenders, tanks, etc are finished painted

1938019381193821938319384.

Steve Swan
03-24-2017, 01:04 AM
1938519386

Shaky Jake
03-24-2017, 10:51 AM
Very Nice.




Kevin

Steve Swan
03-24-2017, 11:02 AM
Very Nice.




Kevin

Thanks Kevin !

Steve Swan
03-25-2017, 12:20 AM
ok. i got the handlebar controls, clutch and exhaust installed.

1939519396193971939819399

harleytoprock
03-25-2017, 08:41 AM
Steve, I love the quality detail finishes on all of the parts. How come the fork rockers aren't pointing down with no bike weight on them?

painterdale
03-25-2017, 09:04 AM
That is sure going to be a beauty! Nice job, Steve. (I especially like picture 4 above with the Double Overhead Cam transmission fitted!)

Dale

Steve Swan
03-25-2017, 12:37 PM
That's a GOOD question. and thank you for noticing that. before i re-assembled the forks, i looked through ALL my pictures for order of assembly, but i had not taken any......

so i went with what seemed to fit. i wonder if i installed the plungers in the wrong position.....? i put the long part of the plungers in the spring tube facing up.

prior to fitting the long portion of plungers in up position, i had them in the down position. When the plungers were in the down position with the fork assembly fully compressed, i had what seemed to be excessive spring sticking out above the tops of the spring fork. as i recall, at least 6 or 8 inches of spring sticking out with fork assembly completely compressed.

with the plungers facing up, i had about 4 inches sticking out with the fork completely compressed.

and just to be clear, the long springs are below the plungers (lower part of spring tube) and the short springs are above the plungers (upper part of tube.)

i'm annoyed with myself because i didn't take any pictures of the order of assembly at the various times i have had forks apart and because i did not run into this the first time i assembled the forks for the first (fitting) build. i guess i thought i could remember something that seemed "so simple" .......

so - should the long portion of the plungers be facing down or up ?

i truly appreciate your observation and look forward to your reply.

enclosed are the best pictures i could find taken during the fitting build that i could find of the forks unloaded. and one with the bike on the lift on the rear stand with the jack removed.

19400194011940219403

TechNoir
03-25-2017, 04:58 PM
so - should the long portion of the plungers be facing down or up ?

Steve, on my 1920 the long portion faces down. I assume it is the same on your 1927 as the forks are basically the same. If you look at post #29 on my build thread you will see a picture of what I mean.

John

Steve Swan
03-25-2017, 05:13 PM
Thanks John ! as i feared. grrr......... i hate taking a fresh restoration apart.

harleytoprock
03-26-2017, 05:23 AM
Steve, Yes, plunger is down. I guess better to find out now than after wheel and fender are on. Check your spring lengths also. I have measurements if you need them.

harleytoprock
03-26-2017, 05:48 AM
Steve, For 1927 the internal spring lengths are 19" lower and 9 3/4" upper. BTW, the olive green looks great! Are all of the olive green parts base coat/ clear coat? Are the stripes under or over the clear? I hope all works out well with the fork.

Steve Swan
03-26-2017, 12:56 PM
Steve, For 1927 the internal spring lengths are 19" lower and 9 3/4" upper. BTW, the olive green looks great! Are all of the olive green parts base coat/ clear coat? Are the stripes under or over the clear? I hope all works out well with the fork.

Thanks so much for the spring measurements. i plan in the next couple days to get the fork off and disassembled and go from there. i will post what i find.

yes, the Olive Green is really a very lovely color, i would not ever have dreamt it before i actually knew what it looked like. depending on the light, it shifts to different hues. yes, all the chassis parts will have base/clear coat and clear over the stripes.

i gave the man who is doing my painting as much information from the forum i could find about clear coating over decals

if i recall correctly, the important things to bear in mind when clear coating over decals is to:

1. let the first layer of clear coat set for 24+ hours before applying decals so bubbling under the decal does not occur
2. highly buff the clear ( do not sand the clear coat before applying decals
3. if one wants to trim off the very edges of decals to prevent 'frosting' around the edges that's fine, but factory applied decals, one could see the clear edging around the periphery of the decal
4. then apply a very light coat of clear

if you've any suggestions, please let me know, i truly do appreciate the wisdom of your experience.

harleytoprock, at one point i knew your name, but have misplaced or forgotten it..... can you share with me again ? Thanks !

harleytoprock
03-27-2017, 06:26 AM
Steve, You know me, I'm John Faraci

Steve Swan
03-27-2017, 10:13 AM
of course, thanks John.

Steve Swan
03-29-2017, 10:54 PM
this looks alot better. what a silly boy i am. Thanks John ! and John !

19432

Steve Swan
04-22-2017, 12:55 PM
parts are starting to come in from the painter, so more progress. and i can say, "ain't she a dandy bus."

1957819579195801958119582

Steve Swan
04-22-2017, 12:57 PM
more pics, the tanks, fropnt fender and tool box will be finished next week.

Steve Swan
04-22-2017, 12:59 PM
195881958919590

TechNoir
04-22-2017, 01:44 PM
Wow even with just those few parts bolted on it is looking fantastic Steve. Well done, I cant wait to see it completed.

John

Steve Swan
04-23-2017, 04:33 PM
thank you John, for your kind words. very exciting to assemble the bike, think of all the machining and fitting work that went in to so many of the parts to make the old fellow a motorcycle again. really a pleasure to assemble the parts, going slowly in part to enjoy the process and not scratch anything ! my Dad would be loving every moment were he here ! makes me SO cognizant we are caretakers of these fine machines for such a short time.

nuklhd
04-24-2017, 04:17 AM
stunning so far. will love to see it when your finished. great work.

Steve Swan
04-24-2017, 04:12 PM
stunning so far. will love to see it when your finished. great work.

Thank you for your kind words !

i expect to have the remainder of chassis body parts in the next few days. when a build is in it's final stage and one has assembled as far as one can assemble, does anyone else walk around the project staring, studying and reflecting.......... for hours ? it can't be just me........

Steve Swan
04-26-2017, 09:30 PM
i got my nickle parts back today for my original air pump. i feel very lucky to have found such a probably rare accessory.

1961219614196151961319616

Steve Swan
04-28-2017, 12:11 AM
today i installed the horn and headlight. here are a few pics including some detail close up shots.

1963719638196391964019641

Steve Swan
04-28-2017, 12:14 AM
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Steve Swan
04-28-2017, 12:21 AM
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Steve Swan
04-28-2017, 12:26 AM
1965219653196541965519656

Steve Swan
04-28-2017, 12:30 AM
1965719658196591966019661

frichie68
04-28-2017, 12:38 AM
Beautiful, Steve, way too nice!

Steve Swan
04-28-2017, 01:37 AM
Beautiful, Steve, way too nice!

Thanks Rich ! i intend to turn it into a used motorcycle !

Steve Swan
05-03-2017, 02:48 AM
the front end's finished ! the tanks will be finished next week. i'll have my 1st cataract surgery Thursday and then my 2nd on June 12. will be interesting, as i'll have 20/20 at 2 miles in my left eye and 20/20 at 2 inches in my right eye. will be an adjustment to no longer have my very close up vision. BUT......... i AM really looking forward to not having to wear glasses when i ride a motorcycle ! have worn glasses since i was 57 years. i'll just buy different strength readers for what i need to see closeup.

19676196771967819679

Steve Swan
05-03-2017, 02:51 AM
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TechNoir
05-03-2017, 01:42 PM
Wow Steve, it just keeps getting better and better.

Congratulations x 2. One for getting so close the finish line on the JD and the second for the good news about the forthcoming cataract removal. I have 2 relatives who have had this done in the last 12 months and they say it is fantastic to get done.

Well done.

John

Steve Swan
05-10-2017, 01:04 PM
Thanks John !

i finished JD11090 last night. What a pleasurable odyssey it has been. in the picture of the cockpit, you'll note an Indian Head Penny and a Indian head Nickle. The penny is 1906 for my dad's birth year and the nickle is 1927. i walked around the lift or sat on a stool at a couple different angles, feasting my eyes and the memories for about 4 hours after i finished. front range Colorado is now in monsoon season, temps in the upper 40's and lower 50's and pretty much some form of daily precip, so not sure when the first ride will be. i think later today, i will go up and start it, just to know it is fully ready to roll.


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Steve Swan
05-10-2017, 01:28 PM
It's been said it takes a village to raise a child. in this case it's taken a group of men from around the world to bring 27JD 11090 back to a complete machine. i went through my receipts and my email and in no particular order, made a list of every person i could think of or remember who has helped me along the process.

THANK YOU TO ONE AND ALL FOR HELPING ME BRING BACK THIS MOTORCYCLE FROM THE DEAD.

Tom’s NOS Parts
Steve DeCosa – tool roll
Colorado Cadmium Plating
Tim – Painter’s Supply, Fort Collins, CO – master paint formulater
Johnny Sells – Vintage Motorcycle Works
Bob Luland – The Good Old Motorcycle Parts Co. – fine parts, sage help & advice
Kurt Rommel – Little Bear Auto Body, Bellvue, CO
Scott Owens – Owens Group (MgSO4)
Design Metal Mfg. crank case repair
Tom Feeser – Replicant Metals
Marcin Okla-Anuszewski - silk screen Sparton horn date plate, craftsman
Buchanan Spoke & Rim
Competition Distributing
Truett & Osborn Cycle, Topeka, KS
Snyder’s Antique Auto Parts
Coker Tire
Roger Long – Sparton horn parts and conservation
Mark Masa – Link Engineering, new cam and clutch parts, sage advice
Jon Neuman – Sagebrush Cycles –front forks, sage advice
Marshall Nix – Black Hills Polishing and Plating
Tom Cotton – Liberty Motorcycle Specialties, DLX38 conservation & sage advice
Michael Breeding
David Butts – riveting work
Marty MacCallum – frame repair
Flatland Motorcycle Company
Rocky Mountain Supply, Fort Collins, CO
Mikael Amroth – Antique Bike, obscure little parts I couldn’t have finished without
Chuck’s Parts
Ray Arndt – Ray’s Motorcycle, Fort Collins, CO – said, “Why don’t YOU build it?”
Richard “Wiff” Withey, Fort Collins, CO, machinist buddy, saved my ass
Al Larsen, Fort Collins, CO – lifelong buddy - sage advice
Joe Drociuk – very patient while offering his invaluable sage advice
JD Yahoo Groups – an incredible group of fine fellows devoted to the H-D JD
AMCA Forum – an incredible group of fine fellows with sage advice
Jiri Filipek – rear sprocket
Al McRoberts – clincher rims
Mike Javernik – fin repair
Phoenix Restoration – correct 1926 patent year tool box decal
John Faraci – sage advice
Harbor Vintage
Peter “Tommo” Thomson – original tools for the tool roll and sage advice
John Brookes – encouragement and advice
Terry Marsh
Bill Christensen – oil pump check valve
J. Napierala Speedometer Shop
Many others – my apologies if I did not remember how you helped me.

Last but not in the least, these two men -

Vernie A. M. Swan. Thanks Dad, for buying my first motorcycle when i was 14. For saving your original can of Olive Green touch up paint all those years from 1927 to 1986. And, for taking ALL those pictures I stared at so many times for six decades. Your pictures kept my dream alive to someday own a 27JD so I could experience the motorcycle joys of your youth. 1906-1991 – RIP

Robert W. Paulette – for letting me spend so much of your time with you in your shop so many different times. For offering your wisdom and guidance when I was a youth, for so generously sharing your knowledge of machine and tool work with me. 1911-1997 – RIP

(And……… The internet. What can I say. Much more effective than post cards, letters, back when too many long distance phone calls had to be part of the monthly budget and fruitless trips.)

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MMasa
05-10-2017, 03:20 PM
Steve
The bike looks ABSOLUTELY gorgeous!
Congratulations on a job EXCEPTIONALLY well done.
Mark

TechNoir
05-10-2017, 03:28 PM
Wow Steve, what a fantastic motorcycle.

I cannot imagine how excited and proud you must feel right now. What a wonderful achievement to have got to this point.

Thanks for the shout out it wasn’t needed but is appreciated. I am honoured to have been a smallest bit of help it has been a genuine pleasure conversing with you and following your progress.

I am looking forward to your first ride.

I am genuinely excited to hear that you have got there although I am sure it is only a tiny fraction of the excitement that you are feeling right now.

John

Steve Swan
05-10-2017, 04:58 PM
Steve
The bike looks ABSOLUTELY gorgeous!
Congratulations on a job EXCEPTIONALLY well done.
Mark

Thank you John, for your kind words. Looking forward to the revival of your 20J !

painterdale
05-10-2017, 06:15 PM
Steve, I couldn't be more excited for you! Congratulations! Fantastic job.
Dale

Steve Swan
05-10-2017, 09:35 PM
Steve
The bike looks ABSOLUTELY gorgeous!
Congratulations on a job EXCEPTIONALLY well done.
Mark

Thanks Mark ! Your cam is pretty much the heart of the engine. And your transmission and clutch parts get it moving down the road.

I went up to the shop today and decided i would start it. It fired the 2nd kick after 2 prime kicks.

Steve Swan
05-10-2017, 09:36 PM
Steve, I couldn't be more excited for you! Congratulations! Fantastic job.
Dale

Thanks Dale !

Shaky Jake
05-10-2017, 09:42 PM
Wow. What a beautiful thing. Well done sir.




Kevin

Steve Swan
05-10-2017, 09:47 PM
Wow Steve, what a fantastic motorcycle.

I cannot imagine how excited and proud you must feel right now. What a wonderful achievement to have got to this point.

Thanks for the shout out it wasn’t needed but is appreciated. I am honoured to have been a smallest bit of help it has been a genuine pleasure conversing with you and following your progress.

I am looking forward to your first ride.

I am genuinely excited to hear that you have got there although I am sure it is only a tiny fraction of the excitement that you are feeling right now.

John

Thanks John for your kind words. Looking forward to your thread on the 20J coming back !

Steve Swan
05-11-2017, 10:48 PM
well, today was a beautiful day, so i rolled the old fellow out into the sun and took a few more pictures. looks alot better on the ground than it does on the lift. then i rode it around the grounds a bit. everything seemed to work like it was supposed to. maybe tomorrow i'll go across the street where there's a nice quiet neighborhood with a large loop where i can get it into 3rd gear. the man on with the big grin is my buddy Ray Arndt. he's been in the motorcycle industry 51 years. he and his wife Cindy closed their "Mom & Pop" shop, March 1st, 2014. I had the privilege of working for Ray full time from 2011 til they closed their doors in 2014. Ray's the guy who said, "Why don't you build it?" when i was bringing in pieces to the shop to share the pain and the joy.

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Steve Swan
05-11-2017, 10:50 PM
here's a few more pics. The Olive Green really is wonderful color, it shifts it's hue, depending on the light.

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Steve Swan
05-11-2017, 10:57 PM
and for shits an giggles, here's some pics of me on different bikes i had growing up.

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Steve Swan
05-12-2017, 03:11 AM
Wow. What a beautiful thing. Well done sir.




Kevin

Thanks Kevin, i appreciate your commendation !

harleytoprock
05-12-2017, 02:32 PM
Bravo! Well done! Words can't describe how much I admire your craftsmanship! I wish we lived closer. It would be an honor and a privilege to ride with you on
our JD's.

Steve Swan
05-12-2017, 04:06 PM
Bravo! Well done! Words can't describe how much I admire your craftsmanship! I wish we lived closer. It would be an honor and a privilege to ride with you on
our JD's.

Thanks John, for your very kind words and your support. That would be fantastic to do a ride together !

Steve Swan
05-19-2017, 04:31 AM
ain't no ridin' for a while. Springtime in the Rockies. been snowin' for nearly 24 hours now, over 8 inches of heavy, wet, tree branch breaking white yuk.

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Steve Swan
05-25-2017, 12:10 AM
Well, a week ago this past Monday, my buddy Wiff brought his trailer and we took the JD to my garage at home. I can't really express the feelings i had bringing it home at last. Relief, excitement and just plain flat out really happy. To have spent so much time to come to the point the bike could leave the shop and finally be at home with me. sounds mushy, but wtf, i LOVE motorcycles. anyway, today i got up the moxie to take a spin with the old fellow. Let me preface, May 4, i had my 1st cataract surgery, so i have 20/15 vision at 2 miles in my operated eye and and 20/20 vision at 2 inches in my not yet operated eye. to deal with the disparity between the 2 eyes, i took the left lens out of the glasses and left the lens in the right side. so, everything looks larger out of my left operated eye and smaller in the right eye that i still use a lens to see at a distance, not the best depth perception. anyway.... the day was beautiful, sunlit and 75 degrees. i took my crusty little 1965 Yamaha YG1-K Rotary Jet 80 and scouted out a 2.8 mile route in the neighborhood, good thing i did, as one part of the route had a 4 way stop that cars would blow through without stopping. Fore-warned is fore-armed, as they say. so, i took the JD out on this route, not much opportunity for much high High Gear work, but still....... WHAT A BLAST !!!!!!!!!!!!!! Everything seemed to work like it was supposed to, the trip-meter on the old Corbin odo recorded 7.4 miles and the top speed needle locked in at just over 28 mph.

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TechNoir
05-25-2017, 04:19 PM
Wow Steve another great milestone, your first ride after it is finished. What a great day.

John

P.S. I think you may be running low on oil supplies! :)

Steve Swan
05-26-2017, 11:17 PM
Ha ! thanks John ! the oil tank's full and i have 15 quarts on hand ! Shell Aviation 50W ashless dispersant.

Steve Swan
06-16-2017, 08:05 PM
looking at my rear wheel speedometer angle drive and looking at these 2 pictures, is my drive in the wrong position ? should the drive be above or below the frame tube....? i can see the cable housing runs straight on the 26 and the 28 whereas my housing has a bit of a bend in it.....

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Steve Swan
06-17-2017, 12:34 AM
the more i'm looking at my pictures, the more convinced i am thinking my drive gear needs to be above the frame tube, not below......20002

TechNoir
06-17-2017, 07:36 AM
Hi Steve, I think that on your 1927 it probably needs to go on top of the top tube based on your pictures.

On my 1920 the cable for the hand operated second brake goes in this position so in my situation then the speedo cable goes on top of the bottom frame tube.

However if a second brake was fitted on your bike then the speedo cable would need to go where it would fit. (if that makes sense)

I am willing to bet that, in 1927, where people had a second brake fitted then the speedo cable went either where you have it at the moment or on top of the bottom tube.

John

Steve Swan
08-09-2017, 04:43 PM
Alrighty then ! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtuptEAlU30

Rode 29.2 miles this morning. Fair weather in neighborhood. Soon as got up to Horsetooth area, began pouring rain. Certainly my thoughts were recalling the story Dad told me when he caught the wash of a truck he met at an underpass in the rain and he cracked the front cylinder. The old fellow putted briskly along, not missing a beat throughout the rain. After Masonville, the rain let up, turned around at Hwy.34 and caught rain again from Masonville to Horsetooth. The outing was absolutely superb.

Getting closer to dialing in the mechanical oiler output. before the outing gave hand oiler 2 pumps = 80cc. when i got back, i dropped 150cc, so i removed the .012" shim. I am now down to 2 thin shims = .0275".

Shaky Jake
08-09-2017, 08:40 PM
Nice.


Kevin

painterdale
08-09-2017, 10:14 PM
Very well done!

Dale

Steve Swan
08-09-2017, 10:55 PM
Nice.


Kevin

Thanks Kevin !

Steve Swan
08-09-2017, 10:56 PM
Very well done!

Dale

Thanks Dale !

TechNoir
08-10-2017, 12:08 AM
Cool! :D

John

Steve Swan
08-10-2017, 03:49 AM
Cool! :D

John

Thanks John, really looking forward to seeing your 20J come to life !

Steve Swan
10-12-2017, 05:02 PM
So ! i got to take out the old fellow for another 30 mile run this morning with my good buddy Jerrold Entzi following me. The morning was exquisite; bright Autumn sun, no wind and 60 degrees at 10 am. The ride was flawless. i now have 160 miles on the engine and everything seems perfect. i adjusted the valve clearances, reset the ignition timer points gap and adjusted both chains at 100 miles. i am now down to one thin (.010") shim on the oiler adjusting screw; this morning i ran two thin shims and accumulated 60 cc or 2 ounces of oil in 30 miles. my run previous to this morning's run, i ran three thin shims, so this morning's run with two thin shims decreased oiler output by 8 cc. I am speculating i will need to run with no shims, but am removing one shim at a time and measuring out put after every run.

i did not post after my first 30 mile ride from my house on to public roads on August 9. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LtuptEAlU30 That day, no precip at my house, sky looked stable, but by the time i got another 500 feet higher, it was misting and 1/4 mile down the road was pouring that lasted about 8 miles, then cleared and i rode another 10 miles, turned around and rode back into pouring rain. the old fellow did not miss a beat and i certainly was recalling my Dad's rain story of front cylinder cracking when he met the wash off a truck going through an underpass. The stream of water coming off the leading edge of the front fender is like a waterfall ! if any of you have ever been up around Horsetooth Reservoir west of Fort Collins, the video was taken south of Masonville.

Masonville would have been a good place to stop, there a couple old buildings there, the one picture is Masonvile Mercantile, built in 1896. i'm still kind of at the point i want to keep moving because everything is running so well. I am getting a alot more comfortable with the bike, so my next run i will stop and take some pictures. i realize i posted no new pictures of the bike, but i will in the future.

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Masonville Mercantile 20871

Across the road, west from the Mercantile20870

harleytoprock
10-12-2017, 05:13 PM
Steve, It's great that the old girl is on the road! Awesome work! Unless someone had done a complete restoration as you did, they cannot appreciate the large amount of work and time that is involved. You will find that the mount of oil that accumulates also depends on the speeds that you ride. At higher speeds the oil pump pumps more but with modern rings you don't consume anymore. Just a thought. I don't worry too much about how much oil is in there since I change mine at least every 150 miles. With 2 pumps of fresh oil, I know I am good with no oil consumption. Keep having fun and enjoy! She's a beauty!

Steve Swan
10-12-2017, 05:39 PM
Steve, It's great that the old girl is on the road! Awesome work! Unless someone had done a complete restoration as you did, they cannot appreciate the large amount of work and time that is involved. You will find that the mount of oil that accumulates also depends on the speeds that you ride. At higher speeds the oil pump pumps more but with modern rings you don't consume anymore. Just a thought. I don't worry too much about how much oil is in there since I change mine at least every 150 miles. With 2 pumps of fresh oil, I know I am good with no oil consumption. Keep having fun and enjoy! She's a beauty!

John, thanks for your encouraging words of experience; coming from you means alot. it's quite a sensation riding a bike built from parts that were never together as a motorcycle. i have to say, my first rides, the bike really did not feel like a motorcycle, if you know what i mean. as i get more miles on the clock, i can literally feel everything seating in, mating together and actually feeling like stuff's working together the way it may have felt when it was new from the factory. what's really cool, is i am getting used to having a rear brake only and stopping power is really not that bad, i simply find i need to accommodate road speeds to match braking performance.

interesting what you say about oiler output; i appreciate that! i'm also giving 2 strokes after dumping the oil. make perfect sense to do oil changes every 150 miles and running a "dry" piston setup, it's nice to know i'm not blowing oil past the piston, into the combustion chamber causing carbon buildup.

i also forgot to say, i got up to 50 mph and had lots of throttle to go. I am still varying my speeds between 30-40 mph and mildly lugging for short distances on hills. i slow down to 30 and speed up to 40.

what's also very cool is the bike is getting dirty with oil, bugs and road grime !

nuklhd
10-13-2017, 01:15 AM
a stunning bike steve. great job now enjoy the riding.

Steve Swan
10-13-2017, 02:07 AM
a stunning bike steve. great job now enjoy the riding.

Thank you !

VPH-D
10-13-2017, 01:33 PM
I used to go thru Masonville a lot back when the road to the west was gravel...
VPH-D

TechNoir
10-13-2017, 02:13 PM
Fantastic, well done Steve.

It looks a bit chilly out west from the Mercantile though!

John

Steve Swan
10-13-2017, 07:21 PM
Fantastic, well done Steve.

It looks a bit chilly out west from the Mercantile though!

John

John, don't believe what you see. i robbed that picture off the 'net !

Steve Swan
10-13-2017, 07:21 PM
I used to go thru Masonville a lot back when the road to the west was gravel...
VPH-D

Those were the days !

Steve Swan
10-17-2017, 02:40 AM
a couple grainy pics i took from the monitor screen of my first 30 mile ride in the rain, August 9.

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Steve Swan
11-23-2017, 12:26 AM
i took the old fellow out for another 30 mile ride today. All flawless. i accumulated 40 cc of oil in 30 miles with two thin shims. Removed another, so I am now down one thin shim, so on my next ride, we'll see how much oil accumulates on the next ride. i now have 167 miles on the engine. Sorry, no pics...... i'll do better next time, might not be til next spring! :)

Tom Lovejoy
11-23-2017, 10:33 PM
Great thread, good job ! Really enjoyed reading about and seeing the build - enjoy !

Steve Swan
11-24-2017, 11:23 AM
Great thread, good job ! Really enjoyed reading about and seeing the build - enjoy !

Thanks Tom !

Steve Swan
03-02-2018, 11:35 PM
I am giving Tommo a HUGE THANK YOU for making available a BEAUTIFUL original headlight for my 27. THANK YOU, Tommo !!!!!

Steve Swan
07-01-2018, 06:27 PM
So, i went for my little 29 mile route up around Horsetooth Reservoir, and then down through Masonville and over to Hwy.34 and turned around, stopped in Masonville and took a couple pics. everything seems to running well after 196 miles, i removed the last thin washer, as i accumulated 30cc (1 ounce) of oil in 30 miles. my prior ride, last November, i gained 40 cc during the same ride/route. so it will be interesting to see how much oil accumulates with no washers. A big thank you to my buddy James Lafler to took up the rear, cars were out in force today. James is in the middle of fitting together his '29 chassis, his engine and trans are restored; his will be a beauty.

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exeric
07-02-2018, 09:03 AM
Gorgeous setting for pictures of your '27, Steve. It is great to see someone having fun with their vintage motorcycle. Keep taking pictures, as I love seeing pictures of that beautiful motorcycle.

Steve Swan
07-02-2018, 01:56 PM
Gorgeous setting for pictures of your '27, Steve. It is great to see someone having fun with their vintage motorcycle. Keep taking pictures, as I love seeing pictures of that beautiful motorcycle.

Thank you Eric!

AdvenJack
07-02-2018, 08:14 PM
While You're Aboard This Outstanding Motorcycle!!!!! :D

https://i.imgur.com/P0727Jzh.png

Steve Swan
07-02-2018, 10:45 PM
Thanks, Jack! i did mine the hard ($$$) way, started with a few pieces and went from there. i would not have been happy with an o.p. bike, i wanted one that looks like new, shiny, bling-bling. doing as much of my own build as i could was a very rewarding personal experience at a number of different levels. and i met some really great folks, without whose help i would not have made it. i've noticed you are making the rounds, and learning your way. do you see yourself getting an old bike, and if so, what interests you?

AdvenJack
07-02-2018, 11:35 PM
Hi Steve,

Yes, I will become an owner of an antique motorcycle or three! I only know
enough to know what I like the "looks of" so far, (approximately 1910-1919
examples have a look that I am really drawn to, like flat frame above the fuel
tank till about 80% back, then it bends, and goes under the seat). I'm very
short on knowledge of what can be done for each bracket of $5,000 expense.
Further, I don't know which bikes have the most "stuff" out there to acquire,
starting with examples that are from the nineteen teens and the art deco look-
ing Indians, which I believe are post WW2. Thank you for asking!
:D

Steve Swan
07-03-2018, 01:36 AM
Hi Steve,

Yes, I will become an owner of an antique motorcycle or three! I only know
enough to know what I like the "looks of" so far, (approximately 1910-1919
examples have a look that I am really drawn to, like flat frame above the fuel
tank till about 80% back, then it bends, and goes under the seat). I'm very
short on knowledge of what can be done for each bracket of $5,000 expense.
Further, I don't know which bikes have the most "stuff" out there to acquire,
starting with examples that are from the nineteen teens and the art deco look-
ing Indians, which I believe are post WW2. Thank you for asking!
:D

my motto is "Ya only live once, life's too short, and ya can't take it with ya." i am a man of somewhat modest means, and have been known to fearlessly overspend when it comes to motorcycles, i have to say motorcycles have been my only material passion for the past 52 years, in particular always antique bikes, i had my Indian era when i owned and rode several twins and fours and also a British pre-unit 500 cc single cylinder era, and have some pretty amazing memories on a number of machines. i max'd a credit card on my JD project, my kid almost killed me (we own a business together), but i paid the damn thing off. the bikes i own are ones that "speak" to me, generally ones i had in my earlier lives and then a couple that i dreamed about owning when i was a kid. with an attitude such as mine, i don't give much reckon to what i spend, and have not made myself homeless. yet... the JD is the last restoration I'll do for myself. in the past year i bought a '67 Royal Enfield Interceptor Mk.1A, and just recently a 68 Bridgestone 350 GTR, both of which i wanted since i was 15. When it comes to what i want, money is secondary, i have found i can't paste a dollar bill in place of a part to make the bike look the way i want it to.... i've posted pics of the Interceptor and the GTR elsewhere on the forum, here are the other three that i have a personal connection to. a '69 Honda CB750 sandcast (vin 232), a '74 Norton Commando Roadster Mk.2, and a '65 Yamaha YG1-K Rotary Jet 80. nothing comparable to the stature of some many of the bikes this forum focuses on, but bikes that have personal meaning to me.

alot depends on how much of your own work you can do, at least in my case, to afford my obsession, i have to be able to do as much of my own work as i am capable, and throughout my life often have learned or taught myself what it is i need to know to get the job done. i have a pretty decently equipped shop of hand tools, but the only real pieces of "big" equipment i have are a floor drill press, and a little Enco lathe, but much of the work on motorcycles is "round" work, so i get by pretty good, and i have local friends who will do mill or hone work when i need it. the rest i have to source out, by far an old or obscure bike will need some machine operations, and those are jobs i send out or find someone who will give me a helping hand. The newer stuff such as i have attached pictures of, when it comes to restoration work, are nothing in comparison to what some of the 65 to 100+ year old motorcycles require. Truly, the JD is the capstone of my time on the planet in my association with motorcycles. any motorcycle you decide on, you are in good hands with the fine fellows who frequent this forum.

when it comes to a bike of the 1910-1920 vintage, at least as i comprehend things, the differences between a 1910 model of any make and a 1920 model of any make, you are venturing into two different worlds and need to be prepared to spend money, at least if you want the bike to be correct like original. your best bet is either to start with one part and build a motorcycle around that part or else find a reasonably complete running or near-runnng survivor that is discouraged against the molestation of a restoration, or buy a restored bike and be done with it. Some bikes are passed down by word of mouth, others hit the dog and pony show auctions, and people such as me who are late returners start with a project made up of parts guys in the 50's through the 70's would have passed on by without a first look. back then, one could find about anything one wanted to spend time looking for. My Dad bought a '34 Indian Four (1967) on a local farm auction for $167.50, and i bought a rough 1960 Gold Star for $75 in '69, another time Dad bought a '36 Chief, a '36 Four, a 37 Junior, and a '48 Chief, all running for $800 in 1968, and bought several rough but running Chiefs for $50-$75. the best one i ever bought was a '48 one-owner Chief with 4,000 miles on it, i rode it 20,000 miles; those were the days... (in that group of four Indians, Dad passed on an Ace powered kit plane for $500... i can still see that cool contraption in my minds eye....) Jack, keep doing your homework, you'll find what you are dreaming for!

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AdvenJack
07-03-2018, 10:10 AM
:D Hi Steve,

Your response above to me is greatly appreciated. Sharing all those
details is very gracious, and to a guy who is just at the beginning of
the learning curve, (me) very encouraging. Another bike that I have
sworn that I will own, is my late 60s - early 70s dream bike, the
Honda CT 70 or it's big bro, the ST 90, me being born in the very
early 60s. I will be doing as much of the work myself, on any project
that I get into, as I am retired and have the time, plus I want to be
thoroughly familiar with any motorcycle that I ultimately operate. I'll
not make a purchase till at least the fall or early winter, as I am
convinced that it will take me that long to build a big enough know-
ledge base. Thank you again for reaching out!

TechNoir
07-03-2018, 05:20 PM
So, i went for my little 29 mile route up around Horsetooth Reservoir, and then down through Masonville and over to Hwy.34 and turned around, stopped in Masonville and took a couple pics.

Hi Steve, your bike look great and so does you ride around Sawtooth. I wish I could have been with you in person but you can bet that I am in spirit.

John

Steve Swan
07-03-2018, 05:28 PM
John, if you are ever in the US, you sure are welcome to spend some time with me touring Colorado which has some pretty amazing paved roads that are not on the beaten path.

TechNoir
07-03-2018, 05:32 PM
John, if you are ever in the US, you sure are welcome to spend some time with me touring Colorado which has some pretty amazing paved roads that are not on the beaten path.

Steve, you can bet that if I am ever within striking distance of Colorado I will certainly be taking you up on your offer.

John

Steve Swan
07-05-2018, 12:42 AM
Steve, you can bet that if I am ever within striking distance of Colorado I will certainly be taking you up on your offer.

John

John, i shall hold you to that!

Steve Swan
07-05-2018, 12:49 AM
Thanks to Tommo, i have my STOP light wired, and boy is that light a big honker, but looks similar if not the same as Dad's light on his '27! Thank you Tommo! i initially went with the yucky cloth covered electrical tape and could not tolerate the horror of it all, so i cheated and went with zip ties and hid them as best i could....... :rolleyes: i figured they had to make do with what they had in '27, so i would make do with what i have 91 years later......:cool: i also lined the inside of the light with aluminum tin foil so the lens would light up a lot better than is shown in the picture before i put the tin foil in the light.

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exeric
07-05-2018, 09:33 AM
Steve, you can also use wiring clips like the attached link. All bikes used them in one form or another. There's a good selection in ebay under 'wiring clips'.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Harley-47-49-BT-Frame-Head-Tube-Wire-Clip-9977-Type-II-Cad-Plated-Colony-2545-1/151378004065?hash=item233ed50861:g:~FUAAOSwxCxT5ZV p

Steve Swan
07-05-2018, 01:08 PM
Steve, you can also use wiring clips like the attached link. All bikes used them in one form or another. There's a good selection in ebay under 'wiring clips'.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/Harley-47-49-BT-Frame-Head-Tube-Wire-Clip-9977-Type-II-Cad-Plated-Colony-2545-1/151378004065?hash=item233ed50861:g:~FUAAOSwxCxT5ZV p

Thanks Eric! i shall take a look at the variety of clips available!

Rubone
07-05-2018, 02:14 PM
Steve, it won't look so big once you get the sidecar and luggage mounted!!

Steve Swan
07-05-2018, 03:04 PM
Steve, it won't look so big once you get the sidecar and luggage mounted!!

Robbie, you gave me a goood chuckle! that luggage on Dad's outfit looks massive! in another view, it looks not nearly as large.... none the less, he was fully loaded, including a passenger! considering the roads he traversed between Cincinnati to rural northeast Nebraska, i cannot imagine his average speed being much more than 25-30 mph.....

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AdvenJack
07-05-2018, 05:26 PM
I've saved this photo!

Steve Swan
07-12-2018, 08:17 PM
These little n.o.s. gems arrived in today's mail, they are exactly what shows in the '27 factory Accessories Book. i could not be more pleased! i'll never run them, or squish the copper washers, but is nice to have such a rare consumable parts that comes with the boxes in such fine condition. The steel parts look nickle plated to me.

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exeric
07-13-2018, 07:09 PM
I got one of those spark plugs in a Merkel motor I had. I didn't know the brand until you posted those pictures, Steve. The laminated mica insulation is unique, but I don't know anything about early spark plugs so mica could have been common. Regardless, I love the looks of those plugs, and I think you found a treasure, Steve.

Steve Swan
07-14-2018, 12:38 AM
I got one of those spark plugs in a Merkel motor I had. I didn't know the brand until you posted those pictures, Steve. The laminated mica insulation is unique, but I don't know anything about early spark plugs so mica could have been common. Regardless, I love the looks of those plugs, and I think you found a treasure, Steve.

Thanks Eric, for your kind words. i just love the little details, and considering spark plugs were such a readily consumable part, the fact i have a pair of n.o.s. plugs is a real treat. i can only imagine how cool they would look compared to the modern massive Champion W16Y's i am now running! What is interesting, i was going through my files, and a factory picture of the '27 engine, clearly appears Wright spark plugs are fitted. (attached). i also just acquired a used green Splitdorf in really nice condition, so i am on the hunt for a second, and if i can get a good pair, i am going to try running them in the '27.

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Steve Swan
09-19-2018, 10:56 PM
It's been a while since i posted, so i thought i'd catch up a little of what i've been up to. i was able to score a couple nice used Splitdorf P157 green hex plugs; after i got them cleaned up, i installed them today to see what would happen next. The old fellow usually starts first kick cold, it popped the first kick (after 2 prime kicks) and started on the 4th kick, ran a little rough but settled down as it warmed up. I only rode it a mile, so the next trip out will be another 30 miles to see how they perform with more running time. I don’t think it’s my imagination, with the Splitdorf’s it certainly seems the engine idles faster at full advance and slower at full retard. (I’ve been running the modern Champion W16Y plugs.) Any thoughts on what I don’t think I am imagining?

Also, i now have the nice original headlight Tommo so graciously sold me and the original switch panel installed as well.

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Steve Swan
09-19-2018, 11:06 PM
here's a little information on Splitdorf "green hex" plugs i gleaned off the internet in my research on mica spark plugs used from the early 1900's up until the late 1930's.

the P157 is the 7/8" plug. the P126 is the 18 mm metric plug. I've learned the green hex plugs came out in 1912 and were last produced in 1929. i've also learned that porcelain for use as insulators around the electrode was not perfected enough to be considered dependable, was prone to cracking because the porcelain did not expand at the same rate as the metal electrode, so mica was used, although the stacked layers of mica degraded with use and would foul from accumulation of byproducts of combustion. It wasn't until the early 1930's that porcelain, specifically zeta alumina was discovered by Helen Blair Bartlett and sintered in porcelain that porcelain insulators were dependable. Helen was a geologist who received her PhD from Ohio state in 1931; her primary interest was spark plugs, she worked for General Motors, then worked on the Manhattan Project and after her atomic bomb work was finished, she returned to GM.

It's going to be interesting running these mica Splitdorf's, because the mica fouls, and the plugs have to be cleaned regularly. Maybe since I'm running a dry upper end, the Splitdorf's won't foul quite as readily. if they do foul, the novelty of running the Splitdorf's may wear off fairly quickly for me. We shall see.....

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i have too much depression era thinking Dad passed on to me to run the nos Wrights brown mica's.... and i am the one who always says "ya only live once." sheesh

exeric
09-20-2018, 10:38 AM
Thanks for posting the new pictures of your '27, and the Splitdorf info, Steve. You really did a beautiful job on a motorcycle that is difficult to get right. In regards to the spark plugs; I have a pair of Splitdorfs that I have run in my '16, but I can't find any numbers or identification, other than 'Splitdorf'. They are 7/8" plugs, and are green, but that's it:)

Steve Swan
09-20-2018, 11:25 AM
Thanks Eric. Splitdorf made more than a few different green plugs i am learning. some differences are obvious and other parts not so much. I am surprised someone has not made modern look-a-likes of these distinctive plugs. Splitdorf advertised the P157 was for the Indian and also for "motorcycles." Same for the P126 metric plug being for "motorcycles." Between all the different makes, i wonder how much concern there was for different "heats." and what race engines required.

exeric
09-20-2018, 12:26 PM
Splitdorf's green spark plugs are my favorite. Spark plug manufactures have no imagination anymore, but I guess reliability is a good tradeoff for pretty:)

Paps
09-20-2018, 06:59 PM
The bike is a true treasure Steve.

nuklhd
09-20-2018, 07:25 PM
Steve, I dig your JD. You did a great job.

Steve Swan
09-21-2018, 01:55 PM
The bike is a true treasure Steve.

Thank you Paps.

Steve Swan
09-21-2018, 01:55 PM
Steve, I dig your JD. You did a great job.

Thank you nuklhd!

Steve Swan
07-29-2019, 02:24 AM
I went back to where i grew up and did a library search; was thrilled to find this article about my Dad's trip from Cincinnati to Hartington, Nebraska, in the local paper, The Cedar County News. Attached are a couple pics taken during that trip. The date of the article is August 18, 1927. Also attached is the expense log he kept during April, 1927, that must have been when he first purchased his '27. 980 miles in 36 hours = average speed of 27.2 mph. Doing the math on his $6.12 gas expense for 980 miles.... based on price per gallon of gas noted in Dad's gas was 25 cents/gallon, that means Dad purchased approximately 24.5 gallons during the trip. Dividing 980 miles by 24.5 gallons, his fuel consumption was approximately 1 gallon per 40 miles. 1 dollar in 1927 is worth $13.79 today; this means a gallon of gas cost Dad about $3.45 in today's dollars. Pulling that side car, I imagine he used at least 1-1/2 quarts of oil.

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Steve Swan
08-06-2019, 10:54 PM
It about killed me to drill a hole in my front fender for the whippet. Dad owned a Whippet automobile.

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painterdale
08-07-2019, 09:30 AM
Steve, well worth it to drill a little hole so you can carry a memory of your Dad with you! I think of my Dad every day.

Dale

Rubone
08-07-2019, 11:19 AM
Nice Steve!

Steve Swan
08-07-2019, 01:00 PM
Thanks for showing the cool sign, Robbie!

Steve Swan
08-07-2019, 01:04 PM
Thank you for your kind words, Dale. I am with you on Dad's. i wish i knew half what he did. Some men from that era had no lack for being inquisitive, having ingenuity, persistence, patience, used hardship as an opportunity for better things and not afraid of hard work.

montuckymatt
08-08-2019, 06:19 AM
Steve, I just read your whole thread start to finish. Great story, great bike. Thanks for sharing this journey on the board. I really enjoyed it. -Matt in Montana

Steve Swan
08-08-2019, 08:43 AM
Matt, thank you for taking time to read the story of my JD. Welcome to the discussion board. Montana is a great state. I am guessing good 'ol GD is your grandfather...? what do you have for bikes?

montuckymatt
08-11-2019, 12:15 AM
Thanks for the welcome Steve. Gd stands for grateful dead. I'm a huge fan and have been for years. I currently ride a 1937 U. My father was very into old Harleys till health reasons forced him to quit riding. He rode a 61 pan all over the country and had a 41 knuck as well. He bought me 3 aeromachi sprints when I was 15 for $500. I made one run out of the three and so began my love for old bikes.

Steve Swan
08-13-2019, 10:47 AM
ound pieces of Edelmann spotlights on ebay to make one good one, the switch handle on the LH lite is nickle, the RH is bakelite. i have another spotlight with a nickle switch handle on the way, so hopefully i can swap out the bakelite switch handle for the nickle handle.

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ihrescue
11-11-2019, 09:32 PM
before i got 27JD11090, over the decades i would look at, hold this can shake the can..... probably 15 years ago, it sprang a leak at the seam, leaking a delightful sticky smelly turpentine smell. VERY CONCERNING because i KNEW SOMEDAY, i would have a JD and would need that paint.

Steve's comments here about ancient paint, its link to his father, and the paint driving Steve to a JD is one of the many back story parts that I love about the Member Bike Builds. Then to tie it in with a skeptical paint mixer is perfect. Way to tell it Steve.

Mike Love

Steve Swan
11-11-2019, 10:13 PM
Mike, thank you for your kind words. You really said it well on the chain of people, places and things that create the fine stories we share here on the build thread. Motorcycles are part of my soul. i remember being in college, a freshman, the school didn't allow freshman to have vehicles. So i found a garage for my bike to keep it till i they let me have it back. i scotch-taped stencil letters, "I LOVE MOTORCYCLES," on my dorm window. Motorcycles represent so many different things to me, i could write a small book. i remember working 3 jobs to get me through nursing school, the one job was the night shift in a nursing home. of all things, i brought the gearbox from by 1960 DBD34 Gold Star into work and rebuilt it when the shift was slow. i finished the bike in our basement efficiency apartment, still remember pulling it up the 2 flights of stairs. still have the #3 piston from the '34 Indian 4 Dad bought on Don Foster's farm auction in 1967. finished the chassis rebuild in our upstairs apartment in my next to last semester of nursing school. stories, stories, stories, we all have 'em. this could make a good topic for members to share their stories.

ihrescue
11-14-2019, 08:59 PM
Chalk up another use for a drill chuck. Is that a 1/2"? I use a smaller Jacobs as a vice for small stuff. I need to rig it up to fit on a tool handle like that.

Nice work

Mike Love