PDA

View Full Version : Carb Cleaning?



OldHog66
04-23-2009, 10:19 AM
My stock Linkert Carb on the '66 FL worked great (before I started the restoration) so to limit the amount of items that i could screw up, and still have it functional upon re-assembly, I have decided not to tear into it or have it fully restored at this time.

But..it has 40 years of crud on the outside. I bought a can of carb cleaner (the spray on kind) and that knocked a lot of crud off of the outside, but it evaporates much quicker than you can take a brush or anything to clean what it doesn't get off.
What the best stuff to use to make the old carb look good (soak or spray) without any risk to gaskets or internals? I'm not really (right now) trying to restore to the original finish, just a solid cleaning without screwing up any of the internals.

Thansk
Steve

Rooster
04-23-2009, 02:27 PM
I've been waiting for Mr. Cotten to post here, but I think I heard him say one time it's a bad idea to dunk an old Linkert into a can of solvent such as Berrymans. Something to do with how it effects the venturi and how it seats into the carb. Just wanted to post a 'caution' until an expert can shed some light on that.

Rubone
04-23-2009, 02:43 PM
'66 does not have a removable venturi. It is a DC carb. I regularly soak the outside of carbs with Gunk engine degreaser. It will not hurt the surface and stays liquid which lends itself to scrubbing with a small brush (old toothbrush works well. Just keep it out of the intake and it won't hurt a thing. You can spray it off with water. The throttle body is cast iron and will most likely need a repaint. The die cast bowl and main body will be a dull gray. By the way, those carbs are dead simple and rebuuild kits are available. Have fun with your project.
Robbie

T. Cotten
04-24-2009, 08:10 AM
I've been waiting for Mr. Cotten to post here, but I think I heard him say one time it's a bad idea to dunk an old Linkert into a can of solvent such as Berrymans. Something to do with how it effects the venturi and how it seats into the carb. Just wanted to post a 'caution' until an expert can shed some light on that.

I do not even know what "Berryman's" is; Sounds like BigIncher is putting more words in my mouth.


....Cotten

Rooster
04-24-2009, 09:31 AM
I do not even know what "Berryman's" is; Sounds like BigIncher is putting more words in my mouth.
....Cotten

If that wasn't advice that you had given at some point, I apologize for the mistake.
Berrymans is something that can be found in most el cheapo auto parts stores, it's advertised as a 'carb and part cleaner'.

bmh
04-25-2009, 07:16 AM
Most auto parts stores sell a carb cleaning solvent in a gallon can, you soak the carb inside it for a while, and it disolves the varnish and gum out of the passages. I can't remember the brand name, I got mine at Advance Auto. It doesn't hurt aluminum carbs, but old linkert venturis are not aluminum so I don't know what effect it may have on them, I never have put one in the can. I never soak a whole carb, only the body and maybe some other parts like shafts and discs after it's been dismanteled. It will remove the paint, so figuire on repainting the body when your done.

T. Cotten
04-25-2009, 08:54 AM
Most Schebler and all bronze Linkert venturies were die-cast potmetal, which varied widely in composition and corrosion resistance over the years.

Common sense should be to avoid strong acids or strong alkali solutions for extended periods of time with ANY hardware, but otherwise: whatever gets the job done.

Most cleaning damage to carbs that I encounter resulted from coarse blast media; The WORST damage I encounter resulted from the use of drillbits for cleaning tools, even when they were the Factory kit.

....Cotten

OldHog66
04-25-2009, 09:25 AM
Great suggestions. Thanks to everyone. As I said (at least for the moment) I'm trying not to rebuild the carb (it runs), so when I put the motor back together I have one less variable to deal with. Goal initiallly is a really good clearning.

Thanks everyone
Steve

GrandpasHarley
04-25-2009, 12:59 PM
I have a carb for my '48 Pan that looks like it was out on the shelf the minute the owner got the bike home. I am restoring my bike so everything will look new, but I refuse to destroy the original patina on the carb.

I would like to clean off the dust and any small gas residue on the carb without destroying the finish. I am going to put a new float and needle in it, but I wasn't going to take it apart otherwise.

Any suggestions on what to clean the outside of the carb with, or recommendations on how far I should take it apart?

I am assuming that I would take a point hit for this carb on a restored bike even if "cleaned up" or maybe not????

Thanks,

T. Cotten
04-25-2009, 07:26 PM
Josh!

That's more than a real beauty if it indeed is un-molested,.. it's a museum piece.
"Patina" is a word stretched unfairly (as it should only apply to bare metal finishes), but if your carb has has the authenticity you represent, then I would declare it has remarkable and enviable "character".

I take great solace in that you intend to concerve the assembly, instead of ravaging it with restoration. It should have history to tell.

May I ask what model is stamped upon it?

Clean up of a real historical piece should progress carefully, with different mild acids, detergents, and different solvents applied strategically for inspection.
A water-born crust may come off best with white vinegar.
Baking soda can occasionally reverse carbonation spectacularly.
Petro solvents are always a risk, but inevitable. Got Carbon Tet?

Ultimately it will always come down to tedious 'mechanical' cleaning, such as with attacks with a dental pick or a swab wrapped with steel wool.
You are at the mercy of your own patience, and thank Providence that you do not do it for a living.

...Cotten

23JDCA 808
04-26-2009, 11:05 AM
If you want to keep the patina, I would be very careful about cleaning the outside with anything. Different metals there and they'll clean up differently. Maybe practice on something similar first? ...bill